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‘My Dog Stupid’: Film Review

‘My Dog Stupid’: Film Review
Rare is the movie about writer’s block that doesn’t end with the frustrated author scrapping his dead-end drafts in order to “write what you know” — i.e., the film we’ve just sat through. More uncommon still is the dog movie that doesn’t rely on its canine lead to warm hearts, jerk tears or teach its owner important lessons about his humanity. So let’s start by giving the French midlife-crisis drama “My Dog Stupid” credit for doing something different with the trite conventions of the two feel-good categories to which it belongs.

Writer-director Yvan Attal has made three films with real-life wife Charlotte Gainsbourg — “My Wife Is an Actress,” “Happily Ever After” and now this — and with each movie, he sands away still more of the mystique that surrounds celebrity couples. Here, he plays Henri Mohen, the literary equivalent of a one-hit wonder, coasting on the
See full article at Variety »

Movie Poster of the Week: Saul Bass at 100

Movie Poster of the Week: Saul Bass at 100
The great Saul Bass—to my mind the greatest graphic designer of the 20th century—was born 100 years ago today, on May 8, 1920. In over a decade of writing about movie posters I’ve only really written about Bass once—in an article about the evolution of designs for Vertigo—which is surprising because he was undoubtedly the first poster designer I ever knew the name of, and of the six movie posters hanging in my apartment two are by Bass: those for Seconds and The Man With the Golden Arm. Saul Bass is just too well known, and has been written about so widely, that I never felt I had much to add to the discussion. And when Jennifer Bass and Pat Kirkham’s extraordinary Saul Bass: A Life in Film & Design was published in 2011 there seemed little more left to say.But I can’t let this centenary pass unremarked.
See full article at MUBI »

Cannes acknowledges late June start no longer possible, considering other options

Cannes acknowledges late June start no longer possible, considering other options
Film festival mulling options after government bans large gatherings until at least mid-July.

The Cannes Film Festival has acknowledged today (April 14) that its plan to reschedule its 73rd edition for end-June, early-July is no longer viable and said it is considering other options. This follows a French government decision to continue a ban on large gatherings until at least mid-July, as part of measures to slow the spread of Covid-19.

“Following the French President’ statement, on Monday, April 13th, we acknowledged that the postponement of the 73rd International Cannes Film Festival, initially considered for the end of June to the beginning of July,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes president Pierre Lescure “optimistic”, debunks insurance company claims

Cannes president Pierre Lescure “optimistic”, debunks insurance company claims
Cannes management team hopes peak of coronavirus epidemic in France will be over by end of March.

Cannes Film Festival president Pierre Lescure told the French newspaper Le Figaro on Tuesday (10) that its management team remained “reasonably optimistic” that the coronavirus outbreak would die out in time for the 2020 edition, scheduled for May 12-23, to take place.

Speculation around whether the festival will go ahead intensified over the weekend after the French government announced a fresh measure banning gatherings of more than 1,000 people until further notice in a bid to slow down the spread of the illness.

“We remain relatively optimistic,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Behold a Pale Horse

Here’s a highly suspenseful thriller with fine characterizations, set in a grim but meaningful place — Fascist Spain in the late 1950s, when Franco’s operatives still hold the country in a tight grip. The very modern story (by Emeric Pressburger) is also timeless: the old lost-cause warrior takes on one last mission into enemy territory. Gregory Peck (he’s good) is the legendary raider on a mission to kill an old enemy, Anthony Quinn.

Behold a Pale Horse

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1964 / B&w / 1:85 widescreen / 118 min. / Street Date July 29, 2019 / Available from Twilight Time Movies / 29.95

Starring: Gregory Peck, Anthony Quinn, Omar Sharif, Raymond Pellegrin, Paolo Stoppa, Mildred Dunnock, Daniela Rocca, Christian Marquand, Marietto Angeletti, Perrette Pradier, Zia Mohyeddin, Rosalie Crutchley, Michael Lonsdale, Martin Benson, Claude Berri, Albert Rémy, Alan Saury.

Cinematography: Jean Badal

Original Music: Maurice Chevalier

Written by J.P. Miller from a novel by Emeric Pressburger

Produced by Gregory
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Pathé chief Jérôme Seydoux to receive CinemaCon award

Las Vegas convention runs April 1-4.

Pathé co-chairman and CEO Jérôme Seydoux will receive the CinemaCon 2019 Career Achievement in Exhibition Award.

Seydoux, who also serves as chairman and CEO of Les Cinemas Pathe Gaumont, will collect the honour at the International Day Luncheon in Las Vegas on April 1.

The industry veteran purchased Pathé Cinema in 1990 and merged it with Gaumont in 2002 to create Les Cinémas Pathe Gaumont, growing an entity that produces in France and the UK and distributes in France and Switzerland.

Les Cinémas Pathe Gaumont operates 108 cinemas with 1,133 screens in France, Netherlands, Switzerland, Belgium and Tunisia, including 23 IMAX,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

La vérité

Brigitte Bardot proved her mettle as a dramatic actress in H.G. Clouzot’s strikingly pro-feminist courtroom epic, that puts the modern age of ‘immoral’ permissiveness on trial. Is Bardot’s selfish, sensation-seeking young lover an oppressed victim? Clouzot makes her the author of her own problems yet doesn’t let her patriarchal inquisitors off the hook.

La vérité

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 960

1960 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 128 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date February 12, 2019 / 39.95

Starring: Brigitte Bardot, Paul Meurisse, Charles Vanel, Sami Frey, Marie-JoséNat, Jean-Loup Reynold, André Oumansky, Claude Berri, Jacques Perrin, Jacques Marin. Fernand Ledoux.

Cinematography: Armand Thirard

Film Editor: Albert Jurgenson

Written by Henri-Georges Clouzot, Simone Drieu, Michèle Perrein, Jérôme Géronimi, Christiane Rochefort, Véra Clouzot

Produced by Raoul Lévy

Directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot

H.G. Clouzot mesmerized audiences with the political outrage of The Wages of Fear and the riveting horror-suspense of Diabolique, but his intellectual,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

10 Takeaways From the 2019 BAFTA Nominations

10 Takeaways From the 2019 BAFTA Nominations
The Favourite” lived up to its name with the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, which graced the homegrown period drama with a commanding 12 film award nominations Wednesday. But Bradley Cooper and Alfonso Cuaron made history, Glenn Close gained some momentum and Spike Lee got some love.

Here are 10 takeaways from this year’s nominations:

1. Give Me A Fiver: Bradley Cooper and Alfonso Cuaron both scored what appears to be a first in BAFTA history, racking up five nominations in a single year across five different disciplines. Cooper is a nominee for best director, leading actor, adapted screenplay, original music and film for “A Star Is Born.” The sudden bonanza gives him seven BAFTA nods throughout his career, tying BAFTA icon Daniel Day-Lewis, who won four trophies for acting. Cuaron nabbed noms for best film, director, original screenplay, cinematography and editing for “Roma.”

2. Close-ing In: Glenn Close’s momentum continues.
See full article at Variety »

One Wild Moment Movie Review

One Wild Moment Movie Review
One Wild Moment (Un moment d’égarement) Under the Milky Way Reviewed by: Harvey Karten Director: Jean-François Richet Screenwriter: Claude Berri, Lisa Azuelos, Lisa Azuelos Cast: Vincent Cassel, François Cluzet, Lola Le Lann, Alice Isaaz, Louka Meliava, Noémie Merlant Screened at: Critics’ link, NYC, 9/7/18 Opens: September 25, 2018 on VOD When you see a guy […]

The post One Wild Moment Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Cannes 1968: The Year Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut Led Protests That Shut Down The Festival

Cannes 1968: The Year Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut Led Protests That Shut Down The Festival
Saturday May 18. The 1968 Cannes Film Festival was about to enter its second week when a press conference was called for 10Am in the Jean Cocteau Theater at the old Palais Croisette. Just a few yards down the road, a budding starlet was preparing to hold court on the beach, imagining she would make headlines with her saucy topless photo-call. No one came. Instead, on a bright, sunny day, the world’s media was crammed into a small, stuffy screening room, watching the festival implode.

Taking the stage and representing themselves as The Cinémathèque Defence Committee were French New Wave stalwarts Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut, the former known for his increasingly radical politicization, the latter not, which made what he was about to say all the more surprising. France, said Truffaut, was in a state of siege, after a spate of recent student protests had escalated into nationwide strikes and violent rioting.
See full article at Deadline »

Rebellion, protests and A-list directors: 50 years of Cannes Directors' Fortnight (needs a pic)

Rebellion, protests and A-list directors: 50 years of Cannes Directors' Fortnight (needs a pic)
Conceived amid the French social unrest of 1968, and born in 1969, Directors’ Fortnight celebrates its 50th edition this year.

Martin Scorsese is a filmmaker more associated with Cannes Official Selection than the sidebars running alongside but this year he hit Directors’ Fortnight to receive its honorary Carrosse d’Or and participate in the opening of its 50th edition in a programme of events billed as “an exceptional day with Mr Scorsese”.

The Palme d’Or and Oscar-winning director also assisted in a screening of his breakthrough picture Mean Streets, which premiered internationally in the then renegade section in 1974, and took part
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes 1968: Like Today, Student Protests Lead the Way to Major Changes

Cannes 1968: Like Today, Student Protests Lead the Way to Major Changes
The teenagers from Parkland, Fla., who led the recent March for Our Lives should know that student protests can have long-range effects. Case in point: The May 1968 protests at the Sorbonne, which led to the premature shutdown of the Cannes Film Festival and major changes in the festival, the French film industry and even the government.

The 21st Cannes Film Festival opened as scheduled on May 10, 1968. That same evening, Paris police attacked an estimated 20,000 Sorbonne students, who had rallied against the policies (including education) of the conservative government under Charles de Gaulle. Hundreds of cops and students were hospitalized. Two days later, 2 million French workers declared a general strike in sympathy to the students and shut down federal and municipal services. The one-day strike was extended as millions more walked out of factories and offices.

The festival was to run May 10-24, with competition films including works by Alain Resnais,
See full article at Variety »

Joshua Reviews Claude Berri’s The Two Of Us [Theatrical Review]

To many, the name Claude Berri doesn’t mean all that much. Studied cinephiles may recognize the name as the one attached to the directing credit of the underrated classic Jean de Florette, while others may simply be ignorant to the director’s filmography completely. However, with an Oscar, 21 directed-by films and nearly 60 producing credits to the French filmmaker’s name, there is a treasure trove of motion pictures just waiting to be rediscovered. And thankfully that appears to be happening.

As part of the Quad Cinema’s A Very Berri Christmas retrospective, Cohen Films is premiering a new, 50th Anniversary restoration of one of Berri’s most beloved works, The Two Of Us. An autobiographical work, this marked Berri’s directorial debut, and stars Alain Cohen as Claude, a young boy caught in the middle of World War II. Sent from Nazi-occupied France to live with a Catholic family in the countryside,
See full article at CriterionCast »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘The Age of Innocence,’ Antonioni, Studio Ghibli & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

Films by Fassbinder, Naruse, Scorsese and more screen as part of “Emotion Pictures.”

Museum of Modern Art

Some of Antonioni’s rarest (and finest) films screen in the ongoing series.

Metrograph

“Christmas at Metrograph” is underway, while “Goth(ic)” comes to an end.

IFC Center

A Studio Ghibli retrospective is underway.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Melville at 100: Playing through August 13 at Grauman’s Egyptian in L.A.

Melville at 100: Playing through August 13 at Grauman’s Egyptian in L.A.
Born 1917, as Jean-Pierre Grumbach, son of Alsatian Jews, Jean-Pierre adopted the name Melville as his nom de guerre in 1940 when France fell to the German Nazis and he joined the French Resistance. He kept it as his stage name when he returned to France and began making films.

Melville at 100 at the American Cinematheque in Hollywood is showcasing eight of his films made from 1949 to to 1972 to honor the 100th year since his birth.

Americn Cinemtheque’s historic Egyptian Theater in Hollywood

The American Cinematheque has grown tremendously sophisticated since its early days creating the 1960 dream of “The Two Garys” (for those who remember). Still staffed by stalwarts Barbara Smith, Gwen Deglise, Margot Gerber and Tom Harris, and with a Board of Directors of Hollywood heavy hitters, it has also been renovated by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association which has spent more than $500,000 restoring its infrastructure and repainting its famous murals.
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Criterion Reflections – L’enfance nue (1968) – #534

David’s Quick Take for the tl;dr Media Consumer:

L’enfance nue (translated into English, “Naked Childhood”) consists of a series of sharply observed and well-chosen moments in the troubled life of Francois Fournier, a ten-year old ward of the French foster care system. Director Maurice Pialat made his feature debut, with the support and assistance of Francois Truffaut and Claude Berri, among others, presenting a story that some might find reminiscent of The 400 Blows but without the romantic charm and lovable mischief we associate with Antoine Doinel. (There are no picturesque romps through the streets of Paris or heroic-epic pilgrimages to the ocean in this one, though there is a mad dash tracking shot of a kid nursing a sprained wrist after he’s tossed to the ground following his assault of one of his peers.) Here, the cast is populated by ordinary people in the most quotidian situations,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Movie Poster of the Week: Cats in Czech and Polish Movie Posters

  • MUBI
Above: 1965 Czech poster for Three Fables of Love (Blasetti, Bromberger, Clair, Berlanga, Italy/Spain, 1962). Designer: Karel Teissig.Two events provoked this article. First of all, last week I saw the wonderful 1963 Czech fable The Cassandra Cat (a.k.a. When the Cat Comes) at New York’s newest cinephile hotspot, the Metrograph. In this charming New Wave satire a cat wearing dark glasses is brought into a small town by a circus troupe and, when his glasses are removed, the townspeople are revealed in their true colors: namely neon shades of purple, yellow and pink, each representing their vices or virtues. The highlight of the film for me, aside from a psychedelic freak-out dance party in the middle of the film, comes when all the children of the town march through the street bearing large drawings of cats. Chris Marker would have loved this film.The second event was the
See full article at MUBI »

Exclusive Trailer For Julien Rappeneau’s Comedy ‘Rosalie Blum’

For his first feature, Julien Rappeneau (son of legendary French director Jean-Paul Rappeneau) has turned to the acclaimed graphic novels of Camille Jourdy for inspiration. The comedy Rosalie Blum follows a thirty-something hairdresser who becomes intrigued by a mysterious woman that enters his life, and so begins a tale of coincidences.

Ahead of a release in France later next month, we’re pleased to exclusively debut the English-language trailer, which highlights a joyful and funny comedy that will hopefully land on the radars of U.S. distributors. In the meantime, those in France can check it out beginning on March 23rd and others can expect it to land at film festivals in the coming months.

Check out the exclusive trailer, images, poster, and synopsis below for the film starring Noémie Lvovsky, Kyan Khojandi, Alice Isaaz, Anémone, and Philippe Rebbot.

Julien Rappeneau’s enchanting directorial debut Rosalie Blum is a warm,
See full article at The Film Stage »

'Cage aux Folles' Actor and French Academy Award Winner Featured in More Than 200 Films Dead at 93

Michel Galabru (right) and Louis de Funès in 'Le gendarme et les gendarmettes.' 'La Cage aux Folles' actor Michel Galabru dead at 93 Michel Galabru, best known internationally for his role as a rabidly reactionary politician in the comedy hit La Cage aux Folles, died in his sleep today, Jan. 4, '16, in Paris. The Moroccan-born Galabru (Oct. 27, 1922, in Safi) was 93. Throughout his nearly seven-decade career, Galabru was seen in more than 200 films – or, in his own words, “182 days,” as he was frequently cast in minor roles that required only a couple of days of work. He also appeared on stage, training at the Comédie Française and studying under film and stage veteran Louis Jouvet (Bizarre Bizarre, Quai des Orfèvres), and was featured in more than 70 television productions. Michel Galabru movies Michel Galabru's film debut took place in Maurice de Canonge's La bataille du feu (“The Battle of Fire,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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