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How we made Rita, Sue and Bob Too

George Costigan: ‘I watched the premiere with my wife on one side of me – and my mother on the other’

Rita, Sue and Bob Too really happened. Andrea Dunbar, who wrote the play and the screenplay, had an affair with a married man, having sex with him in his car, along with her friend Eileen. I commissioned the play as a follow-up to her 1980 drama The Arbor. Andrea was the most talented and original young writer I’d ever come across.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Doctor Who: 42 characters who died and came back to life

It's not just Rory. These 42 Doctor Who characters have all, in their own way, died and been resurrected...

Spoilers! Lot of them, for Doctor Who of old and new lie ahead. Including the (publicised) return of a face or two to Doctor Who series 9.

Cheating death is a fundamental part of the make-up of Doctor Who. It's lasted for 52 years so far, whether on television or in spin-off media, and that's in no small part because of the original idea to recast the title character in 1966, thus creating the concept of regeneration.

But resurrection has also affected the characters around the Doctor and with a new series about to start, that looks to be as prominent as ever. Heck, series 9 even has a two-parter called The Girl Who Died and The Woman Who Lived. Plus, we already know that apparently dead characters such as Missy, Osgood and River Song will
See full article at Den of Geek »

Happy Valley

Network: Netflix

Episodes: Ongoing (hour)

Seasons: Ongoing

TV show dates: August 20, 2014 -- present

Series status: Has not been cancelled

Performers include: Sarah Lancashire, Steve Pemberton, Siobhan Finneran, George Costigan, Joe Armstrong, James Norton, Adam Long, and Charlie Murphy.

TV show description:

This British drama follows Catherine Cawood (Sarah Lancashire), a tough police sergeant in West Yorkshire who's trying to cope with the horrific death of her daughter.

When she happens to see Tommy Lee Royce (James Norton), the man who she believes raped her daughter and brought on her suicide, Catherine becomes completely engrossed in finding him. Along the way, she discovers that this criminal's story goes a lot deeper than she initially believed, and everything begins to unravel in front of her.

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See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Neville Longbottom actor Matthew Lewis joins Happy Valley series 2

The cast for the second series of Happy Valley has been announced in full, and there are plenty of new and familiar faces.

Sarah Lancashire will return in the lead role, alongside the likes of James Norton, Siobhan Finneran, George Costigan, Karl Davies and Charlie Murphy.

Harry Potter's Matthew Lewis (Neville Longbottom) is among the newcomers to the show. He'll be joined by former Coronation street stars Katherine Kelly and Julie Hesmondhalgh.

Shirley Henderson, Amelia Bullmore, Downton Abbey's Kevin Doyle and Cucumber's Con O'Neill and Vincent Franklin also star.

Airing next year, the six-episode series sees Catherine and her team hunt down a potential new serial killer in Calder Valley.

Writer and Executive Producer Sally Wainwright said: "I am thrilled to be embarking on a second series. We were delighted and overwhelmed with the viewers' response to series one and it's clear that there's a huge appetite
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

BBC’s ‘Happy Valley’ Concludes Strong Run; Is It The Next ‘Broadchurch’? (Video)

  • Deadline TV
Six-part BBC One crime drama Happy Valley hails from Sally Wainwright, the prolific UK TV writer and BAFTA-winning creator of Last Tango In Halifax. The series that has had Britain all abuzz over the past month and a half came to its climactic concludsion Tuesday night and drew 6.18M viewers for a 28% share. The finale, which should rise a fair bit when delayed viewings are included, was the second-highest rated of the run after the April 29 debut episode attracted 7.64M viewers. Over the series, it averaged about 6.9M and consistently won its slot. The contemporary show is being called the best drama of the year and Wainwright has said there is potential for a second season. There is no deal for the first season to air in the U.S. as yet, but it’s easily the kind that could turn up on BBC America or PBS. It could even be remade à la Broadchurch,
See full article at Deadline TV »

Happy Valley episode 1 review

Review Patrick Sproull 29 Apr 2014 - 22:49

Don't be fooled by the title. BBC's new drama series is many things, but "happy" probably isn't one of them...

Sally Wainwright cannot put a foot wrong. Her magnum opus, the critically acclaimed Last Tango In Halifax, was a master class in how TV’s depiction of our older generation doesn’t always need to result in ageist caricatures and Scott & Bailey is still going strong albeit sans Wainwright. With Last Tango In Halifax’s third series in the pipeline, it seems the writer fancied something else altogether. The result is Happy Valley, BBC One’s new Tuesday night drama, and it really is quite excellent.

Catherine Cawood (Last Tango in Halifax alumnus Sarah Lancashire) doesn’t have a great life. “I’m Catherine, by the way,” she says breezily, to a man planning to set fire to himself. “I’m 47, I’m divorced,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Blu-ray Release: Rita, Sue and Bob Too

Blu-ray Release Date: April 8, 2014

Price: Blu-ray $24.95

Studio: Twilight Time

The 1987 British comedy Rita, Sue and Bob Too by esteemed cult director Alan Clarke makes its Blu-ray debut courtesy of Twilight Time.

The movie is a sex farce and then some: a biting critique of Britain’s Thatcher years’ society that blends horror and humor to shattering effect. The story of two teenagers (played by Downton Abbey’s Siobhan Finneran, and Michelle Holmes) who enter into a sexual misalliance with a married man (George Costigan), the film paints a grisly but amusing picture of misspent British youth in an age devoid of dreams.

Special features on the Blu-ray include an isolated music & effects audio track, an audio commentary with film historians Julie Kirgo and Nick Redman, and liner notes by Kirgo.

Twilight Time prints up only 3,000 copies of each title, the time to pre-order your Blu-ray discs directly from distributor Screen Archives is Now!
See full article at Disc Dish »

Sarah Lancashire, Steve Pemberton for BBC One thriller Happy Valley

Sarah Lancashire and Steve Pemberton are to star in a new BBC One crime thriller.

Happy Valley is written by Last Tango in Halifax's Sally Wainwright, and a six-part series will air in 2014.

Siobhan Finneran (Downton Abbey), George Costigan (Unforgiven), Joe Armstrong (Robin Hood), James Norton (Rush), Adam Long (Waterloo Road), Karl Davies (Game of Thrones), Ramon Tikaram (EastEnders) and Charlie Murphy (The Village) will also star in the drama.

The series will follow Catherine (Lancashire), a police sergeant who leads a team of officers in a rural valley in Yorkshire. A staged kidnapping soon creates a domino effect and leads to several other serious crimes.

Lancashire said: "Happy Valley is a dark, funny, multi-layered thriller revolving around the personal and professional life of Catherine, a dedicated, experienced, hard-working copper.

"She is also a bereaved mother who looks after her orphaned grandchild. It's an emotional, complex, challenging role. I'm terrified,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Nicola Walker's psycho Scott and Bailey research

Nicola Walker visited a psychologist before playing 'Scott & Bailey' character Helen Bartlett. The actress - who is best known for her eight-year stint as Ruth Evershed in drama series 'Spooks' - found out some ''really grim but fascinating'' information about psychopaths to research how to realistically portray her alter-ego in the detective drama show. Helen - the estranged daughter of Joe Bevan (George Costigan) and his now dead wife Eunice - left her family home 30 years ago after a disturbing childhood, which involved her dad killing her brother and making her help to bury him. Nicola said: ''I like
See full article at Virgin Media - Celebrity »

Gemma Collins 'still loves' Arg

Nicola Walker visited a psychologist before playing 'Scott & Bailey' character Helen Bartlett. The actress - who is best known for her eight-year stint as Ruth Evershed in drama series 'Spooks' - found out some ''really grim but fascinating'' information about psychopaths to research how to realistically portray her alter-ego in the detective drama show. Helen - the estranged daughter of Joe Bevan (George Costigan) and his now dead wife Eunice - left her family home 30 years ago after a disturbing childhood, which involved her dad killing her brother and making her help to bury him. Nicola said: ''I like
See full article at Virgin Media - TV »

Antonia Thomas Currently Filming ITV Military Wags Drama 'Homefront'

British network ITV Studios describes its new program, Homefront, as "a contemporary new drama" about military Wags (wives and girlfriends), and Misfits-alum Antonia Thomas stars in one of the lead roles. The six-part drama, filming on location in Manchester and Chesire, also stars Claire Skinner, Clare Higgins, and Nicola Stephenson. A press release from ITV reveals that director Terry McDonough and producer Kim Crowther "bring to life this compelling and emotional drama lead by four profound women." Check out the synopsis for Homefront: Paula Raveley (Higgins) a veteran army wife is glad to be on civvy street with husband Howard (George Costigan)....
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Theatrical Review: The Arbor

Rating: 5/5

Director: Clio Barnard

Cast: Kate RutterChristine Bottomley, George Costigan

Within the world of film, the documentary is often considered something of an outsider. Often fueled by talking heads and simple archival footage, the world of the documentary is either relatively stale, full of uninteresting slogs through uninteresting life stories or events, or wholly biased, with people like Michael Moore and Morgan Spurlock turning themselves into bigger stars than their pieces of non-fiction.

Read more on Theatrical Review: The Arbor...
See full article at GordonandtheWhale »

Competition: The Arbor – DVD Giveaway

This is a UK competition for the DVD release of The Arbor, directed by Clio Barnard and starring Kate Rutter, Christine Bottomley and George Costigan. The Arbor is out now on DVD and, to celebrate, Pure Movies is giving away three copies! The Arbor tells the powerful true story of Bradford playwright Andrea Dunbar (The Arbor, Rita, Sue and Bob Too) and her daughter Lorraine. A captivating and revelatory piece of cinema, The Arbor is directed by artist and director Clio Barnard and will open in cinemas nationwide from October 22 through Verve Pictures.
See full article at Pure Movies »

'The day I shared a pint or five with Pete Postlethwaite'

In 1997, Simon Hattenstone went to the pub with Pete Postlethwaite while the actor, who died earlier this week, was starring in Macbeth. Read the interview again

Act One: lunchtime, a pub in Bristol. Three men, actor Pete Postlethwaite, Dennis, a publicist, and Dick, a producer, sit supping pints of Guinness. Enter a Journalist, who has never met the actor before.

Postlethwaite: "Simon, Simon. What can we do about this?"

Dennis: "You're late, and Pete has a full dress rehearsal in 20 minutes."

Exit Dick to get a round of drinks.

Postlethwaite: "Any chance of hanging around for three hours or so? Then we'll have a proper chat. A proper drink, a good time."

However often you've watched Pete Postlethwaite on stage or screen, it's hard to prepare for the close-up: the compact body, dainty feet dressed in Kickers, the skin – cross-hatched with thin red contours – resembling a faintly exotic cheese,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Pete Postlethwaite obituary

Oscar-nominated British actor with a vast range who could move between comedy and tragedy with ease

The actor Pete Postlethwaite had a face that elicited many similes, among them "a stone archway" and "a bag of spanners". These unflattering descriptions, plus his tongue-twisting surname, would suggest an actor with a career limited to minor supporting roles. But Postlethwaite, who has died of cancer aged 64, played a vast range of characters, often leading roles, on stage, television and film.

He was at ease in switching the masks of tragedy and comedy. The working-class martinet father he played in Terence Davies's film Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988), which Postlethwaite credited as his big break, can be seen as paradigmatic of his career. Postlethwaite powerfully conveyed the father's double-sided nature: at one moment he is tenderly kissing his children goodnight, the next he is ripping the tablecloth off in a rage.

Postlethwaite was
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Pete Postlethwaite obituary

Oscar-nominated British actor with a vast range who could move between comedy and tragedy with ease

The actor Pete Postlethwaite had a face that elicited many similes, among them "a stone archway" and "a bag of spanners". These unflattering descriptions, plus his tongue-twisting surname, would suggest an actor with a career limited to minor supporting roles. But Postlethwaite, who has died of cancer aged 64, played a vast range of characters, often leading roles, on stage, television and film.

He was at ease in switching the masks of tragedy and comedy. The working-class martinet father he played in Terence Davies's film Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988), which Postlethwaite credited as his big break, can be seen as paradigmatic of his career. Postlethwaite powerfully conveyed the father's double-sided nature: at one moment he is tenderly kissing his children goodnight, the next he is ripping the tablecloth off in a rage.

Postlethwaite was
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

What makes a great Doctor Who Christmas special?

Bring on the star guests, the panto villain, and the festive setting – and don't forget to almost crash a giant spaceship

Earlier his week, selected journalists and an army of carol-singing Welsh children were given the first glimpse of the sixth Doctor Who festive special A Christmas Carol (Link may contain spoilers). All of which excitement got us thinking about what ingredients go into making a great seasonal edition of Who. So we applied science, and this is what we concluded… let us know if you agree.

Christmas

It was 2005's The Christmas Invasion that established that a good Doctor Who Christmas Special should always be Christmassy – and since Doctor Who thrives on making horror out of the everyday, that has meant killer robot Santas, killer spinning Christmas trees and killer exploding baubles. Indeed, Christmas became such a dangerous time for the people of Earth that by 2007's Voyage Of The Damned
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Lff 2010 – The Arbor Review

Clio Barnard’s film The Arbor is extremely thought provoking, primarily because of the social issues rising from life on a former rough estate that it flags. However, much as these issues capture the attention, their importance should not be confused with how good/bad a film it is at its core.

The Arbor’s style of actors lip-synching to tape-recorded testimony by the family, friends and associates of working-class playwright Andrea Dunbar (Rita, Sue and Bob Too!) may prove too disconcerting for some to marry together. It does take some getting used to and appears like out-of-sync audio with the visuals at first, even with some commendable acting performances. That said, and playing devil’s advocate, it could be argued that this makes the story more immediate and impactful.

On first glance, The Arbor appears to be about how fame came to Dunbar, but it actually takes a different
See full article at HeyUGuys »

The Arbor – review

This strangely affecting film tells the story of two sad lives lived out on a run-down estate in Bradford, one tragic, the other touched with tragedy but not yet over. It concerns the working-class playwright Andrea Dunbar and her daughter Lorraine, the eldest of three children she had with different fathers. Andrea drew on her life for the plays The Arbor and Rita, Sue and Bob Too! (which Alan Clarke made into a successful film in 1986) and died of a brain haemorrhage in 1990, largely due to her unruly life and heavy drinking.

Ten when her mother died, Lorraine was subject to racist insults as a result of having a Pakistani father, became a drug addict and slipped into prostitution to pay for her habit. She was jailed for manslaughter after her two-year-old son died after consuming his mother's methadone, but is now out of jail.

The two lives are reconstructed
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Back to Bradford: Andrea Dunbar remembered on film

Andrea Dunbar shot to fame with Rita, Sue and Bob Too, her frank play about a Bradford estate. Now her own brief life is the subject of a film

The Buttershaw estate in Bradford is no longer the wilderness of burnt-out cars and waist-high grass depicted by its most famous resident, the playwright Andrea Dunbar, in the 1980s. A balmy Saturday morning finds most of the gardens well tended and the plain, postwar semis in a good state of repair. I'm here to watch the shooting of a new film about Dunbar's life. But when I head towards a cluster of vehicles that has attracted a crowd of onlookers, I discover that they belong not to film-makers, but the police. What's going on? "Drugs raid," says a bystander. "Welcome to Buttershaw."

The film unit, it turns out, is in the next street, Brafferton Arbor, where Dunbar grew up, and after which her first play,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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