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We’re Giving Away Four ‘The Cotton Club’ Posters Signed by Francis Ford Coppola

Are you a fan of Oscar-winning director Francis Ford Coppola, the visionary filmmaker behind classics like The Godfather trilogy, Apocalypse Now, and The Outsiders? What about his 1984 film The Cotton Club, the jazzy, 1930s-set crime-drama starring Diane Lane, Richard Gere, Gregory Hines, Lonette McKee, and Nicolas Cage? Whelp, we have one heck of an opportunity for ya. Collider is giving away four posters for The Cotton Club signed by Francis Ford Coppola himself and created by artist Laurent Durieux. Here's how to enter: You need to email thecollidermailbox@gmail.com with the subject line "The …
See full article at Collider.com »

Francis Ford Coppola Recalls How Conflicts, Racial Politics Hurt ‘The Cotton Club’ – New York Film Festival

  • Deadline
Francis Ford Coppola Recalls How Conflicts, Racial Politics Hurt ‘The Cotton Club’ – New York Film Festival
Francis Ford Coppola wished his old frenemy Robert Evans could have made the trip to a screening of The Cotton Club Encore, the new version of the 1984 film that Coppola spent half a million dollars of his own money to re-edit, expand and re-release.

Coppola directed and Evans produced the original film about the famed Harlem nightclub operated by New York gangster Owney Madden, where black entertainers from Duke Ellington to Cab Calloway performed to white-only audiences.

Despite a star-studded cast, the production as he described it was a messy stew of editorial conflict, shady financing, lawsuits and too many scenes on the cutting room floor.

Thirty-five years later, Coppola has reinserted 35 minutes of footage he said distributors weren’t comfortable with at the time.

“They said. ‘It’s too long, there’s too much tap dancing, too many black people,
See full article at Deadline »

‘The Cotton Club Encore’ Film Review: Francis Ford Coppola’s Butchered Masterpiece Gets Its Redemption

  • The Wrap
‘The Cotton Club Encore’ Film Review: Francis Ford Coppola’s Butchered Masterpiece Gets Its Redemption
Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Cotton Club” was thought of as an expensive flop after it was released in 1984. Coppola has said that producers forced him to cut footage of Gregory Hines, who was meant to be a male co-lead with Richard Gere, to focus more on the love story between Gere and Diane Lane, and the result felt lifeless and cold.

But Coppola has restored the Hines footage for this new version, which has been dubbed “The Cotton Club Encore,” and it might also be called “The Cotton Club Transformed,” because this cut makes a film that felt like a failure into one of Coppola’s very best pictures. This movie is a feast with all the trimmings, and then some.

Coppola has a history of revisiting his films and putting out different cuts of them, as in his “Apocalypse Now Redux” and his longer version of “The Outsiders,
See full article at The Wrap »

‘The Cotton Club Encore’ Trailer Previews Francis Ford Coppola’s New Restored Reworking

As Francis Ford Coppola continues to prep for his long-gestating sci-fi epic Megalopolis, the director has been looking back his career. After restoring Tucker: The Man and His Dream, he reworked and restored Apocalypse Now, and now he’s returning to his 1930s-set musical-meets-crime drama with The Cotton Club Encore. Following the inner workings of a Harlem jazz club, the film wasn’t a hit upon its 1984 release, but now Coppola has spent about a half a million of his own dime to restore the image and sound, as well as re-edit the project to include the originally-envisioned ending, new dance numbers, and more.

“I always felt that the movie got cut down; there was 25 or 30 minutes taken out and a lot of the black story got cut out. I found the Betamax of the original cut. I don’t think in the release version of The Cotton Club you
See full article at The Film Stage »

Film News Roundup: ‘Wonder Woman’ Director Patty Jenkins Honored by Cinematographers

  • Variety
Film News Roundup: ‘Wonder Woman’ Director Patty Jenkins Honored by Cinematographers
In today’s film news roundup, Patty Jenkins is honored, “Waves” will close the Hamptons Film Festival, Ellen Burstyn and Emma Thompson are cast, and “The Cotton Club” has been expanded.

Jenkins Honored

The International Cinematographers Guild will honor “Wonder Woman” director Patty Jenkins with its inaugural Distinguished Filmmaker Award.

The award will be presented at the 2019 Emerging Cinematographer Awards on Oct. 6 at the Saban Media Center in North Hollywood.

“The Distinguished Filmmaker Award was created to honor filmmakers who best understand the crucial role cinematographers play in capturing their vision, and who exemplify the best in that working collaboration,” said Lewis Rothenberg, national president. “Ms. Jenkins is truly a ground-breaking auteur widely known for appreciating the detailed contributions of her craft departments, and particularly her camera team. She is an incredible inspirational and educational role model for our emerging cinematographers.”

Hamptons Closing Film

The Hamptons International Film Festival has
See full article at Variety »

Francis Ford Coppola’s ‘The Cotton Club’ Is Returning to Theaters With Director’s Cut

Francis Ford Coppola’s ‘The Cotton Club’ Is Returning to Theaters With Director’s Cut
A new cut of Francis Ford Coppola’s 1984 crime drama “The Cotton Club” is set to hit theaters this fall following a bow at the 2019 New York Film Festival. “The Cotton Club” stars Richard Gere, Diane Lane, Gregory Hines, Bob Hoskins, Laurence Fishburne and Nicolas Cage and is set in 1930s Harlem at the legendary jazz venue from which it takes its name. For the initial release, Coppola bent to outside concerns that he edit the film to focus solely on Gere’s character Dixie Dwyer. The Director’s Cut will presumably hew closer to the filmmaker’s original intent, which was to focus just as much on the character played by Gregory Hines, a dancer named Delbert “Sandman” Williams.

The official synopsis for the re-release reads: “In this lavish, 1930s-era drama, Harlem’s legendary Cotton Club becomes a hotbed of passion and violence as the lives and loves of entertainers and gangsters collide.
See full article at Indiewire »

First Trailer for 'Encore' Cut of Coppola's 1984 Film 'The Cotton Club'

"We're here!" Who's ready for another round at The Cotton Club? Lionsgate has debuted a new trailer for The Cotton Club Encore, which is the official title for a "new iteration" of Francis Ford Coppola's 1984 film The Cotton Club. With his team at American Zoetrope, Coppola set out to create an updated version that would more closely resemble the original intentions of the film. This new version, shown only at the 2017 Telluride Film Festival, features additional scenes such as an extended Gregory Hines & Maurice Hines tap performance, Lonette McKee's brilliant rendition of "Stormy Weather," the originally envisioned ending, and more. Set in the 1930s, the film centers around the The Cotton Club, a famous night club in Harlem. Starring Richard Gere, Gregory Hines, Diane Lane, & Lonette McKee, with Bob Hoskins, James Remar, Nicolas Cage, Allen Garfield, Laurence Fishburne, & Gwen Verdon. This new cut will play at the New
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Francis Ford Coppola’s ‘The Cotton Club Encore’ To Hit Theaters In Early October After NY Film Festival Screening

  • Deadline
Lionsgate will release Francis Ford Coppola’s recut of his 1984 film The Cotton Club in select theaters on Oct. 11, with a screening at the New York Film Festival prior on Oct. 5. The pic will arrive on Blu-ray, DVD, and Digital on Dec. 10 with exclusive new bonus material.

The pic which stars Richard Gere, Diane Lane, Gregory Hines, Bob Hoskins, Laurence Fishburne and Nicolas Cage is set against 1930s Harlem and the legendary Cotton Club which was a crossroads for entertainers and gangsters. When the film was released, it was seen as a crime drama centering around Gere’s Dixie Dwyer character, but Coppola meant for it to be a story of two main characters, one white and one black, navigating life in and around the Cotton Club with their families. The film was deemed too long during post production in 1984, with stakeholders forcing Coppola to minimize Hines’ character and lose many musical numbers.
See full article at Deadline »

Nyff reveals special events line-up by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2019-08-24 17:44:10

A Special Event sneak preview and Q&a with Joaquin Phoenix and Joker director Todd Phillips Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Film at Lincoln Center has announced Special Events for the 57th New York Film Festival, including a Screenwriting Master Class with Olivier Assayas, presented by Warby Parker, Martin Scorsese (The Irishman) and Pedro Almodóvar (Pain And Glory with Antonio Banderas) in On Cinema talks with Kent Jones, and Directors Dialogues from Bong Joon-ho (Parasite) and Mati Diop (Atlantics: A Ghost Love Story).

Snowpiercer and Parasite director Bong Joon-ho will do a Directors Dialogue Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Joker with Joaquin Phoenix and director Todd Phillips in a Q&a, a free screening and panel discussion on Roee Messinger's American Trial: The Eric Garner Story, and Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club Encore "for which the director recovered lost negatives to bring the film back to its original length and luster,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Gardens of Stone

Francis Coppola’s get-out-of-debt directorial assignments may not be his most personal movies, but this one is satisfying just the same, with its marvelous, mellow ensemble cast. It’s a movie to admire, as it’s not easy to attract an audience to a show about the Army’s burial detail.

Gardens of Stone

Blu-ray

Powerhouse Indicator

1987 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 111 min. / Street Date January 21, 2019 / available from Powerhouse Films UK / £17.33

Starring: James Caan, Anjelica Huston, James Earl Jones, D.B. Sweeney, Dean Stockwell, Mary Stuart Masterson, Dick Anthony Williams, Lonette McKee, Sam Bottoms, Elias Koteas, Laurence Fishburne, Casey Siemaszko, Peter Masterson, Carlin Glynn, Bill Graham.

Cinematography: Jordan Cronenweth

Film Editor: Barry Malkin

Original Music: Carmine Coppola

Written by Ronald Bass from the novel by Nicholas Proffitt

Produced by Francis Ford Coppola, Michael I. Levy

Directed by Francis Ford Coppola

Let’s make a feel-good movie about the Dead of War! I don
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Aretha’s Greatest Albums: ‘Sparkle’ (1976)

Aretha’s Greatest Albums: ‘Sparkle’ (1976)
Aretha Franklin, who died on August 16th at age 76, recorded more than 40 full-length albums in her six-decade career. It’s a deep catalog, crowded with indisputable classics and hidden gems. Rolling Stone’s music staff is paying its R.E.S.P.E.C.T.s to the Queen with tributes to our favorite Aretha LPs. Next up: Mosi Reeves on the creative sparks that flew when Aretha met Curtis Mayfield.

When Aretha Franklin’s revelatory Southern soul collaborations with producer Jerry Wexler cooled in the early ’70s, she spent
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Francis Ford Coppola: Why He Spent $500K to Restore His Most Troubled Film, ‘The Cotton Club’

Francis Ford Coppola: Why He Spent $500K to Restore His Most Troubled Film, ‘The Cotton Club’
Francis Ford Coppola never meant to make “The Cotton Club” — yet he was dragged back, like Al Pacino in “The Godfather 3,” into making another big-budget movie. Now, 33 years later, he’s spent another $500,000 (of his own money) to restore the film and create “The Cotton Club Encore,” a longer cut that premieres today at the Telluride Film Festival.

Producer Robert Evans had hoped to direct “The Cotton Club,” a valentine to the legendary Harlem nightclub where Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway, Lena Horne, and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson made their names. He raised $8 million in foreign pre-sales at Cannes, but he couldn’t solve the script. According to the gory details in his autobiography “The Kid Stays in the Picture,” the whole production was a chaotic, coked-up nightmare. He turned to Coppola for help, paying him to write several drafts and finally direct, which became a battle in its own right.

At the end,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Francis Ford Coppola: Why He Spent $500K to Restore His Most Troubled Film, ‘The Cotton Club’

  • Indiewire
Francis Ford Coppola: Why He Spent $500K to Restore His Most Troubled Film, ‘The Cotton Club’
Francis Ford Coppola never meant to make “The Cotton Club” — yet he was dragged back, like Al Pacino in “The Godfather 3,” into making another big-budget movie. Now, 33 years later, he’s spent another $500,000 (of his own money) to restore the film and create “The Cotton Club Encore,” a longer cut that premieres today at the Telluride Film Festival.

Producer Robert Evans had hoped to direct “The Cotton Club,” a valentine to the legendary Harlem nightclub where Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway, Lena Horne, and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson made their names. He raised $8 million in foreign pre-sales at Cannes, but he couldn’t solve the script. According to the gory details in his autobiography “The Kid Stays in the Picture,” the whole production was a chaotic, coked-up nightmare. He turned to Coppola for help, paying him to write several drafts and finally direct, which became a battle in its own right.

At the end,
See full article at Indiewire »

Smackdown '84: Glenn Close, Dame Peggy, Lahti, Crouse, and Page

Presenting the Supporting Actress Class of '84. The Academy looked way back in time for this vintage collecting characters from the 1920s through the 1940s: a British senior on an excursion to see "the real" India, a Depression era beautician, the ex-girl of a ballplayer, and a former singer working in a factory during World War II. The sole contemporary character was a chain-smoking furious mother from Greenwich Village...

Glenn Close and Geraldine Page were the regulars... about to lose again!

1984 

Supporting Actress Smackdown  

The Nominees: The 1984 Supporting Actress list skewed more mature than usual. Lindsay Crouse, surely buoyed by the love for Best Picture player Places in the Heart, and the promising new star Christine Lahti who was the least familiar face to moviegoers at the time, were the youngest, both in their mid 30s. Glenn Close, on her third consecutive nomination in the category, and Geraldine Page with
See full article at FilmExperience »

Review: Julie Dash's 'Illusions' (Digitally Remastered Version Released on DVD This Week)

Editor's Note: This week, Women Make Movies, a leading distributor of movies made by and about women, announced a special re-release of the digitally remastered "Illusions," Julie Dash’s acclaimed portrait of race and identity in 1940s Hollywood. The film centers on Mignon Duprée (Lonette McKee), a Black woman studio executive who appears to be white and Ester Jeeter (Rosanne Katon), a Black woman who dubs the singing voice for a white Hollywood star. The drama follows Mignon's dilemma, Ester's struggle and the use of cinema in wartime Hollywood: three illusions in conflict with reality. Called "one of the most brilliant achievements in style...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

New on DVD: Digitally Remastered Version of Julie Dash's 'Illusions' Starring Lonette McKee (On Race and Identity in 1940s Hollywood)

Women Make Movies, a leading distributor of movies made by and about women, has announced a special re-release of the digitally remastered "Illusions," Julie Dash’s acclaimed portrait of race and identity in 1940s Hollywood. The film centers on Mignon Duprée (Lonette McKee), a Black woman studio executive who appears to be white and Ester Jeeter (Rosanne Katon), a Black woman who dubs the singing voice for a white Hollywood star. The drama follows Mignon's dilemma, Ester's struggle and the use of cinema in wartime Hollywood: three illusions in conflict with reality. Called "one of the most brilliant achievements in style and concept in recent...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Atl 'La Rebellion' Retrospective Review: 'Illusions,' 'Fragrance,' & 'Rain'

Editor's Note: The La Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema film series tour continues its travels, making its final stop in Atlanta (Ga), running October 25 through November 24, 2013. The Atl installment of the series is sponsored by Emory University’s Department of Film and Media Studies, liquid blackness, for Georgia State University’s Department of Communication, and the Atlanta Film Festival, in association with UCLA Film & Television Archive. In Julie Dash’s film Illusions, Mignon Dupree, played by Lonette Mckee says, “People make films about themselves.” Though she is referring to the exclusionary...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

DVD, VOD, Digital Release: Luv

DVD, VOD and Digital Release Date: April 2, 2013

Price: DVD $19.97

Studio: Indomina/Vivendi

Common (r.) gives his nephew some life lessons in Luv.

Common (The Odd Life of Timothy Green), Danny Glover (Death at a Funeral) and Meagan Good (Think Like a Man) star in the 2012 coming-of-age drama Luv.

In the film, Woody (Michael Rainey Jr.) lives with his grandmother (Lonette McKee, The Cotton Club) and longs for his family to be reunited. His charismatic Uncle Vincent (Common) has just returned home after eight years in prison, determined to straighten out his life. One morning, instead of dropping Woody off at school, Vincent decides to give the boy a tutorial on how a man gets things done. Woody jumps at the chance to join his father figure for the day. Their time together changes from optimistic to desperate as Vincent’s plan to open a restaurant is crushed and his past
See full article at Disc Dish »

16 Must-See Black Lgbt Films

16 Must-See Black Lgbt Films
In 1989, Donna Deitch directed the made for TV movie "The Women of Brewster Place" starring and produced by Oprah Winfrey, which was based on Gloria Naylor’s 1982 novel of the same name.

The film featured an all-star cast and included two lesbian characters played by Lonette McKee (Lorraine) and Paula Kelly (Theresa). The couple flees their middle-class suburban neighborhood due to their sexuality and makes Brewster Place their new home. However, they soon find they're facing the same issues that they faced while living in their previous residence.

Though McKee and Kelly’s characters were not lead roles, their story was groundbreaking at the time. Over 20 years later, African American lesbian director Dee Rees released her film "Pariah," which tells the coming-out and coming-of-age story of a young black lesbian and garnered Rees many accolades.

In between that 20-year span a handful of black lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender (Lgbt
See full article at Huffington Post »
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