Colin Stinton - News Poster

News

‘Hunter Killer’ Review

  • Nerdly
Stars: Gerard Butler, Gary Oldman, Common, Corey Johnson, Adam James, Henry Goodman, Colin Stinton, Carter MacIntyre, Shane Taylor, Mikey Collins, Will Attenborough, David Gyasi, Linda Cardellini | Written by Arne Schmidt, Jamie Moss | Directed by Donovan Marsh

American submarine Captain Joe Glass is on the hunt for a U.S. sub in distress in the Arctic Ocean. He soon learns that a secret Russian coup is in the offing, a conspiracy that threatens to dismantle the world order. With crew and country on the line, Glass must assemble an elite group of Navy SEALs to sneak through enemy waters, rescue the kidnapped Russian president and prevent World War III.

Donovan Marsh’s Gerard Butler and Gary Oldman staring, Hunter Killer is an unapologetic 90s action throwback and while it basks in the glory of outlandish politics and toxic masculine bravado, it undoubtedly should have been left in the era it was designed for.
See full article at Nerdly »

Movie Review – Hunter Killer (2018)

Hunter Killer, 2018.

Directed by Donovan Marsh.

Starring Gary Oldman, Gerard Butler, Common, Ryan McPartlin, Linda Cardellini. Michael Nyqvist, Michael Trucco, Caroline Goodall, Zane Holtz, Toby Stephens, David Gyasi, Gabriel Chavarria, Carter MacIntyre, Taylor John Smith, Henry Goodman, Colin Stinton, Shane Taylor, Will Attenborough, Christopher Goh, Sarah Middleton, Mikhail Gorevoy, Adam James, Corey Johnson, Alexander Diachenko, and Ilia Volok.

Synopsis:

An untested American submarine captain teams with U.S. Navy Seals to rescue the Russian president, who has been kidnapped by a rogue general.

If Hunter Killer had stayed underwater for the duration of its running time, there might have been something worthwhile to come out of it. Unlike most Gerard Butler action vehicles, this one has more of an espionage thriller feel to it, and a dialed back performance from the macho leading man of such “America fuck yeah” movies; it still clearly functions as military propaganda that is disinterested
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Revisiting the Jason Bourne Franchise

Jason Bourne is returning to action in the appropriately titled Jason Bourne. This will be the fourth time Matt Damon plays the highly trained assassin with a memory problem, but it’s the first time since 2007 he’s headlined a Bourne flick.

If you have amnesia when it comes to the Bourne series, don’t worry, we are here to help. Here are mission briefs (with some spoilers) on the previous installments of the Jason Bourne franchise to get you ready for Friday’s release of Jason Bourne.

The Bourne Identity

Year of Mission: 2002

Mission Cost: $60 million

Recouped Budget (Box office): $214 million worldwide

Mission Recap: In Jason Bourne’s first big screen adventure, Bourne is found in middle of the Mediterranean Sea with no memory of who is. After learning about a safe deposit box in Germany, he finds numerous passports, a large amount of money, and a gun.
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

Academy Awards Film Series: Roberts Shines in Nichols' 'Virginia Woolf' Redux

'Closer' movie: Julia Roberts. 'Closer' film review: The perfect dysfunctional date movie Mike Nichols' first feature film, an adaptation of Edward Albee's acclaimed play Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, is a harrowing dissection of two married couples whose inner demons are let loose during a night of game playing, drinking, and screaming. That was back in 1966. Fast forward to 2004 and to another Mike Nichols film adaptation of an acclaimed play, Patrick Marber's Closer, another look at two dysfunctional heterosexual couples, this time in the age of cyberspace and AIDS. Apart from the fact that the story's time frame has been stretched from one night to a couple of years, on the surface not much has changed since the mid-'60s: the new quartet also dwells in a social bubble in which they bicker, yell profanities, pretend to be someone else, and are utterly vicious to one another. On a deeper level,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Movie Review: Rush

Given that both the gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and the motion picture camera came to be at almost the same time, and given that both cars and movies have gone on to hold such special places in American culture, it’s no wonder that Hollywood has had a long love affair with automobiles and racing. From the silent film Racing Hearts (1922), to Disney’s Herbie franchise, to the late Tony Scott’s Days of Thunder (1990), to Universal’s Fast & Furious series, almost as long as there have been movies, there have been movies about cars. Now, award-winning director Ron Howard has entered the automotive film waters with Rush, a biographical action-drama about the 1976 Formula One season and the rivalry between drivers James Hunt and Niki Lauda. Rush is a very good movie, and definitely one to keep an eye on as we head into awards season.

After they first meet
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

Movie Review: Rush

Given that both the gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and the motion picture camera came to be at almost the same time, and given that both cars and movies have gone on to hold such special places in American culture, it’s no wonder that Hollywood has had a long love affair with automobiles and racing. From the silent film Racing Hearts (1922), to Disney’s Herbie franchise, to the late Tony Scott’s Days of Thunder (1990), to Universal’s Fast & Furious series, almost as long as there have been movies, there have been movies about cars. Now, award-winning director Ron Howard has entered the automotive film waters with Rush, a biographical action-drama about the 1976 Formula One season and the rivalry between drivers James Hunt and Niki Lauda. Rush is a very good movie, and definitely one to keep an eye on as we head into awards season.

After they first meet
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

Review - Red Mist

It isn’t often that I’ll watch low budget horror fare and go away thinking “that’s a pretty good film”, but tonight that’s exactly what I thought after popping Red Mist into the trusty DVD player.

Red Mist (or “Freakdog” in the States) is directed by “Shrooms” helmer Paddy Breathnach and stars Arielle Kebbel (”The Uninvited”, “Gilmore Girls”), Andrew Lee Potts (”Primeval”, “Ideal”), Alex Wyndham (”Little Dorrit”, “Rome”) and Colin Stinton (”House of Saddam”, “The Bourne Ultimatum”), the film hits UK theatres on 3rd July 2009.

The medical students at Forthaven General Hospital study hard and party harder, until a cruel prank accidentally puts the facility’s creepy janitor into a deep coma. But when one responsible student tries to revive the degenerate loner with an experimental injection, she instead sends his brainwaves berserk. Will a sudden spree of sick kicks now claim the guilty one-by-one, or has
See full article at FilmShaft.com »

Red Mist Becomes 'Freakdog'

Paddy Breathnach's (Shrooms) latest horror project has been given a new name, according to the IMDb. The website reports that the once titled Red Mist is now known as Freakdog and stars Arielle Kebbel (Grudge 2), Sarah Carter (Skinwalkers), Stephen Dillane, Andrew Lee Potts (return to House on Haunted Hill), MyAnna Buring (The Descent), Martin Compston (Doomsday), Michael Jibson, Colin Stinton, Michael J. Reynolds and Alex Wyndham, among many others. The film is set to be released by Anchor Bay Entertainment and Starz sometime in 2009. A young doctor in a Us hospital administers a powerful and untested cocktail of drugs to a coma victim. But instead of curing him, it triggers a powerful "out-of-body" experience and enables the patient - a depraved and dangerous loner - to inhabit other people's bodies and, through them, take revenge on the bullying medical students who were accidentally responsible for his condition.
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed