News

Criterion Collection: The Story of Temple Drake (1933) | Blu-ray Video Review

“Women will understand!” read one of the many various taglines associated with The Story of Temple Drake, the pre-code rape and revenge talkie the release of which, despite its box office success, pushed Hollywood into the vicious enforcement of the Production code a year later, the moral censorship developed in 1930 which would plague American cinema until its complete collapse at the end of the 1960s. But would they (women) understand? And if so, what exactly is Faulkner’s treatment (here adapted by Oliver H.P. Garrett and Maurine Dallas Watkins) saying about women, or at least a certain kind of ‘woman’ as this is a tale preoccupied with rich, desirable, privileged (i.e.,…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Theatre Review: Chicago (UK Tour)

Chicago review: Come and see how the prettiest women ever charged with murder get free for an evening of fabulous entertainment.

Chicago review by Katey Thompson.

This is an evening full of music, dancing and singing. Chicago is based true events that happened in Chicago in the 1920’s and is based on the play written by Maurine Dallas Watkins. It is about two vaudeville acts who are being tried for murder, with lyrics and music by John Kander and Fred Ebb.

Roxie Hart is brilliantly performed by Hayley Tamaddon (of Emmerdale and Coronation Street fame) a night club singer who shoots her lover whilst declaring undying love for her husband Amos. Neil Ditt portrays this non-descript man with excellent pathos and humour, especially when he performs the classic Mister Cellophane. Velma Kelly, a double murderess is depicted brilliantly by Sophie Carmen-Jones. Whilst in prison Roxie steals Velma Kelly’s place
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Old Ass Movies: The Old Razzle Dazzle of ‘Roxie Hart’

Your weekly fix of great movies made before you were born that you should check out before you die. This week’s Old Ass Movie celebrates one of the funniest flicks about capital punishment ever made. Roxie Hart takes the wrap for killing her lover so she can make it big in Chicago. Her smooth-talking lawyer promises to get her off and get her out on the town as a starlet, and everyone from the judge to the press seems to be in on the gag. What? You trust everything you read in the papers? What’s a newspaper? Go look it up first and come back to discover how funny hanging someone can be. Roxie Hart (1942) Directed By: William A. Wellman Written By: Nunnally Johnson, adapted from the play “Chicago” by Maurine Dallas Watkins Starring: Ginger Rogers, Adolphe Menjou, George Montgomery, William Frawley, and Lynne Overman In a modern context, Roxie Hart
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

"Back to the Future" in Blu, Uwe Boll's in "Darfur" and More New DVDs

  • IFC
A look at what's new on DVD today:

"Back to the Future: 25th Anniversary Trilogy"

Directed by Robert Zemeckis

Released by Universal Home Entertainment

Yes, we're finally getting the footage of the original Marty McFly, Eric Stoltz, for the first time, but for many simply having the hi-def version of Robert Zemeckis' time-travel franchise will be good enough. Commentaries, deleted scenes, a full-length documentary and much, much more come on this new set of the trilogy.

"Alien Anthology"

Directed by Ridley Scott, James Cameron, David Fincher, Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Released by Fox Home Entertainment

While not as much of an upgrade over its previous DVD release as "Back to the Future," the Blu-ray update of the four "Alien" films worth owning now boasts isolated scores for each film, all of Ridley Scott's sketches for the first "Alien," the uncut documentary of David Fincher's ill-fated "Alien 3" as
See full article at IFC »

The Forgotten: Toddlin' Town

  • MUBI
The big question about Chicago (1927), the first version of the famous play which later gave us Ginger Rogers as Roxie Hart and, ahem, some other people in a musical, is, "Did credited director Frank Urson really direct it, or is producer Cecil B. DeMille the film's true controller?"

I'm inclined to credit Urson, although I haven't seen any of his other fourteen films (he never made it into talkies, dying in 1928 just as the writing became visible on the wall, and the actors started reading it aloud). Possibly because the film's too good. But it certainly has a DeMille touch about it too, notably a reveling in sinful excess, followed by a bludgeoning morality play ending. Anybody who's enjoyed the crawling hypocrisy of a DeMille bible story will recognize the same mentality in Jazz Age drag.

Phyllis Haver is Roxie Hart, the most convincing if not the most charming embodiment of that particular fictionalized person.
See full article at MUBI »

Cecil B.DeMille’s Risqué Chicago on DVD: Phyllis Haver Shines as Roxie Hart

Chicago, the restored 1927 silent (unofficially) directed by Cecil B. DeMille and starring perky Phyllis Haver (right, with Victor Varconi) as Roxie Hart, is being released on DVD by Flicker Alley, in collaboration with The Blackhawk Films Collection. The 2002 Chicago remake, based on Bob Fosse’s musical which itself was taken from Maurine Watkins‘ stage play, starred Renee Zellweger (as Roxie), Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Richard Gere. It was a good-sized box-office and critical hit. Directed by Rob Marshall from a screenplay by Bill Condon (who’ll next be directing The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn), Chicago won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress (Zeta-Jones). I’m probably in the minority here, but I thought the Chicago remake was all [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Mint Theater's So Help Me God Opens 12/3

Mint Theater Company today announced that its second offering of the season, So Help Me God! by Maurine Dallas Watkins (the author of Chicago, the play upon which the musical is based), directed by Mint Artistic Director Jonathan Bank, will begin as scheduled on Wednesday, November 18th, with opening night set for December 7th at the Lucille Lortel Theater (121 Christopher Street). Kristen Johnston, two-time Emmy Award winner for her performance in "3rd Rock from the Sun," will perform the role of Lily, a fabulous dramatic diva who must fend off a challenge from her ambitious but naïve understudy, played by Anna Chlumsky (My Girl films).
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Kristen Johnston Headlines Watkins' 'So Help Me God' Off-Broadway

  • TheImproper.com
Actress Kristen Johnston, best known for her comedy role in the hit TV sitcom ‘Third Rock from the Sun,” will take the lead in the Mint Theatre Company production of So Help Me God!, which previews Off-Broadway starting today (Nov. 18). Johnston (The Women) stars as Lily, a demanding lead actress and struggling stage diva, who is determined to remain in the spotlight. Anna Chlumsky (”My Girl,” Fabulous Life of a Size Zero) is her ambitious, yet naïve understudy, who is just as determined to replace her. The late writer Maurine Dallas Watkins wrote Chicago (the basis for the Kander and Ebb musical), as well as the screenplays “Libeled Lady” and “Roxie Hart.”
See full article at TheImproper.com »

Mint Theater Co Holds Reading Of So Help Me God! With Kristen Johnston 6/8

Mint Theater Company will present a reading of the backstage farce, So Help Me God! by Maurine Dallas Watkins on Monday, June 8th at the Lucille Lortel Theatre (121 Christopher Street). Kristen Johnston, three-time Emmy Award winner for her performance in "Third Rock from the Sun" will read the leading role of Lily, a fabulous dramatic diva who must fend off a challenge from her ambitious but naïve understudy.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Mint Theater Presents A Reading Of Watkins' So Help Me God! 6/8 In NYC

Mint Theater Company will present a reading of the backstage farce, So Help Me God! by Maurine Dallas Watkins on Monday, June 8th at the Lucille Lortel Theatre (121 Christopher Street). Kristen Johnston, three-time Emmy Award winner for her performance in "Third Rock from the Sun" will read the leading role of Lily, a fabulous dramatic diva who must fend off a challenge from her ambitious but naïve understudy.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed