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The Titfield Thunderbolt

Toot Toot! The Little Engine that Could becomes a tale of the little town that could, when their tiny rail service is discontinued. A crackerjack cast of Ealing regulars — Stanley Holloway, Naunton Wayne, John Gregson — band together to take over the little spur line and keep it running. We get to see a vintage locomotive from the early 1800s in action, but the appeal isn’t limited to lovers of trains — Ealing’s knack for inspired, understated comedy is all over this show. Plus, it’s the company’s first feature in Technicolor, and is beautifully remastered.

The Titfield Thunderbolt

Blu-ray

Film Movement Classics

1953 / Color / 1:37 Academy / 84 min. / Street Date , 2020 /

Starring: Stanley Holloway, George Relph, Naunton Wayne, John Gregson, Godfrey Tearle, Hugh Griffith, Gabrielle Brune, Sidney James, Reginald Beckwith, Edie Martin, Michael Trubshawe, Jack MacGowran, Ewan Roberts.

Cinematography: Douglas Slocombe

Film Editor: Seth Holt

Original Music: Georges Auric

Written by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Passport to Pimlico

Much of Ealing Studios’ core appeal begins right here, with T.E.B. Clarke’s astute look at the character of pragmatic, energetic Londoners, who in this fantasy face an outrageous situation with spirit, pluck, and a determination not to be cheated. What happens when a few square blocks of London discover that they’re no longer even part of the British Empire? A classic of wartime ‘adjustments,’ the ensemble comedy even begins with a Tex Avery- like ode to rationing.

Passport to Pimlico

Blu-ray

Film Movement Classics

1949 / B&w / 1:37 Academy / 84 min. / Street Date December 20, 2019 / 29.95

Starring: Stanley Holloway, Hermione Baddeley, Margaret Rutherford, Sydney Tafler, Betty Warren, Barbara Murray, Paul Dupuis, John Slater, Jane Hylton, Raymond Huntley, Philip Stainton, Roy Carr, Nancy Gabrielle, Malcolm Knight, Roy Gladdish, Frederick Piper, Charles Hawtrey, Stuart Lindsell, Naunton Wayne, Basil Radford, Gilbert Davis, Michael Hordern, Arthur Howard, Bill Shine, Harry Locke, Sam Kydd.

Cinematography: Lionel
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Night Train to Munich

Modern spy movies have nothing on this Brit thriller produced just as war broke out -- Rex Harrison, Margaret Lockwood and Paul Henried clash with Nazi agents, and risk a daring escape to Switzerland. The witty screenplay is by the writers of Hitchcock's The Lady Vanishes and the director is Carol Reed, in terrific form. Night Train to Munich Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 523 1940 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 95 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date September, 2016 / Starring Margaret Lockwood, Rex Harrison, Paul von Hernried, Basil Radford, Naunton Wayne, James Harcourt, Felix Aylmer, Roland Culver, Raymond Huntley, Fritz (Frederick) Valk. Cinematography Otto Kanturek Film Editor R. E. Dearing Written by Sidney Gilliat, Frank Launder story by Gordon Wellesley Produced by Edward Black Directed by Carol Reed

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Alfred Hitchcock's successful series of 1930s spy chase thrillers -- The Man Who Knew Too Much; The 39 Steps --
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘The Hidden Room’ is a very personal film, both for its antagonist and its director

The Hidden Room (aka Obsession)

Written by Alec Coppel

Directed by Edward Dmytryk

U.S.A., 1949

On a quiet London night British upper class housewife Storm Riodan (Sally Gray) and secret American ex-pat lover Bill Kronin (Phil Brown) return the former’s lavish flat for a night of passion. Unbeknownst to them Storm’s husband, the brilliant if extremely sensitive Dr. Clive Riodan (Robert Newton) lingers behind the curtains, listening to their every word. He eventually makes his presence known, catching both completely off guard in the process. So intense is the doctor’s jealousy that he threatens to murder dear Bill point blank with a firearm. When Storm retires to her quarters out of embarrassment, the doctor forces Bill to accompany him outside when the film cuts to…a scene few days later as Clive Riodan attends to a patient in his private office. His wife is convinced his
See full article at SoundOnSight »

2013 TCM Classic Film Festival Adds More Movies, Stars & Frank Capra’s The Donovan Affair (1929) To Lineup

The 2013 TCM Classic Film Festival continues to expand, with newly added appearances by legendary stars at screenings of some of their most memorable films, including Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner, Mickey Rooney, Jonathan Winters, Marvin Kaplan, Barrie Chase, Polly Bergen,Coleen Gray, Theodore Bikel and Norman Lloyd, as well as producer Stanley Rubin, Clara Bow biographer David Stenn, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) film collections manager Katie Trainor and director Nicholas Ray’s widow, Susan Ray. In addition, TCM’s Essentials Jr. host and Saturday Night Live star Bill Hader will present screenings of Shane (1953) and The Ladykillers(1955).

And The Film Forum’s Bruce Goldstein will present a special screening of Frank Capra’s The Donovan Affair (1929), complete with live voice actors and sound effects to replace the film’s long-lost soundtrack.Mel Brooks is slated to talk about his comedy The Twelve Chairs (1970). Carl Reiner, Mickey Rooney, Jonathan Winters, Marvin Kaplan
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

10 Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies

Michael Leader Nov 2, 2019

Alfred Hitchcock, the Master of Suspense, had a career that spanned 50-plus films. We think we can narrow it down to the 10 best.

Whenever geeky film conversations turn to the topic of the greatest British directors, a few answers frequently crop up: Charlie Chaplin, David Lean, Nicolas Roeg, and Michael Powell are just a handful of a list of potentials, but there is one man whose impact on film history outclasses almost all contenders: Alfred Hitchcock.

Born on the cusp of the 20th Century, Hitchcock came to define entire genres of cinema in a career that spanned over 50 years and over 50 films. His body of work - not to mention his rotund body itself - is both immense and iconic, full of tense thrillers, psycho-dramas, and adventure flicks that were not only wildly popular at the time, but inspired both critical re-evaluation and whole new generations of filmmakers in ensuing years.
See full article at Den of Geek »

My favourite Hitchcock: The Lady Vanishes

On top of a mesmerising plot, perfect casting and the greatest comic duo in British cinema, this comedy thriller derives special urgency from the troubled times in which it was made

Hitchcock and railways go together like a locomotive and tender. He loved them, they figure significantly in his work and never more so than in The Lady Vanishes. Much of what happens could only take place on a railway line – passengers delayed together by an avalanche; classes compartmentalised; strangers trapped together as they're transported across a continent; an engine driver killed in crossfire; a carriage disconnected and shunted on to a branch line; an intrepid hero struggling from one carriage to another outside a fast-moving train as other locomotives rush by; clues in the form of a name traced in the steam on a window, and the label on a tea packet briefly adhering to another window; and above
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Lady Vanishes by Jonathan Coe

The novelist relishes Hitch's prewar comedy adapted by Gilliat and Launder because it both satirises and celebrates the English stiff upper lip

It might not be his best film, but Hitchcock never made anything warmer or more lovable than this. I must have seen it 20 or 30 times and can't imagine ever growing tired of it.

Kudos to his collaborators, first of all. Frank Launder and Sidney Gilliat's screenplay is sharper than anything written for Hitchcock's other British films (or his American films, come to that – except possibly for North by Northwest) and you could make a strong case for regarding it as a Launder and Gilliat film rather than a Hitchcock one, if authorship has to be decided. That sometimes endearing indifference to nuances of dialogue and characterisation that marks even some of Hitchcock's best films is nowhere to be found here: the edgy banter between Michael Redgrave and Margaret Lockwood really sparkles.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Blu-ray Review: Passport to Pimlico – Welcome Addition to Studio Canal’s Ealing Collection

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Although Ealing Studios did not exclusively make comedies – actually, less than ten percent of their output was comic – it is the run of comedies from the late ’40s into the ’50s that the studio is best remembered for, and it’s not difficult to see why. Under the leadership of Michael Balcon, the legendary British producer who also founded Gainsborough Pictures, they produced incredibly sharp, witty and likeable comedies ranging from the whimsy of a film like Passport to Pimlico to the razor-sharp black comedy of Kind Hearts and Coronets, also released in 1949.

The movies were quintessentially British, and often got funnier as they got darker precisely because the characters had to uphold good British virtues while getting away with political upheaval (Passport to Pimlico), theft (The Lavender Hill Mob, one of their best) or murder (Kind Hearts and Coronets). This paradox is prevalent in Passport to Pimlico,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

DVD Review - Passport to Pimlico (1949)

Passport to Pimlico, 1949.

Directed by Henry Cornelius.

Starring Stanley Holloway, Betty Warren, Barbara Murray, Paul Dupuis, John Slater, Jane Hylton, Naunton Wayne and Hermione Baddeley.

Synopsis:

When an unexploded WWII bomb detonates in Pimlico, an ancient document is unearthed which states that the area is in fact part of Burgundy, France and thus foreign territory.

When you stop to think about it, film is a fascinating thing. Especially a film like this, some 63 years old this year. Passport to Pimlico is more than a classic comedy. It stands as a historical record, not necessarily of actual events, but of an attitude. This attitude is so purposely and so definitively of its time that you hardly even need an introduction to how something like it could come about.

Almost no introduction, anyway. The film deals with the broad strokes, but a little detail won’t hurt. Britain in World War II
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Blu-ray Review: Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘The Lady Vanishes’ Gets Criterion Upgrade

Chicago – Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Lady Vanishes” isn’t one of his most heralded films. You don’t hear it mentioned on most lists of the best works of arguably the most influential director who ever lived. And yet it was the third film chosen for The Criterion Collection and has now been given the upgrade and joined the esteemed Blu-ray ranks of the most important collection in the history of home entertainment. If you’re unfamiliar with this witty, delightful gem of a thriller, there’s no other way to experience it for the first time. And if you’re a fan of Hitchcock’s more famous films, do yourself a favor by checking out one of his earliest.

Blu-Ray Rating: 5.0/5.0

The Lady Vanishes” had actually been in production with a different director when Alfred Hitchcock came on board mostly to satisfy his British contract before heading to the States.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

This Week On DVD and Blu-ray: December 6, 2011

DVD Links: DVD News | Release Dates | New Dvds | Reviews | RSS Feed

This week I thought I would add a few holiday deals from Amazon for you to check out before getting into the week's new releases. Maybe you'll find something you like.

Blu-ray Deals Toy Story Ultimate Toy Box Collection ($49.99) The Lord of the Rings: The Motion Picture Trilogy (Extended Editions) ($49.99) Inception ($7.99) The Ultimate Matrix Collection ($32.99) Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1 ($9.99) The Dark Knight ($7.99) Batman Begins ($7.99) DVD Deals It's a Wonderful Life (60th Anniversary Edition) ($10.99) Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1 ($4.99) The Wizard of Oz (Two-Disc 70th Anniversary Edition) ($7.99) Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince ($5.00) The Hangover ($6.99) The Blind Side ($5.49) Gone with the Wind (Two-Disc 70th Anniversary Edition) ($8.49) And now for today's new releases...

The Lady Vanishes (Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray] A great film and a solid presentation, and a disc owners of even the four-year-old DVD remaster
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

New Release: The Lady Vanishes Blu-ray

Release Date: Dec. 6, 2011

Price: Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Michael Redgrave (l.) and Margaret Lockwood do some investigating in The Lady Vanishes.

It’s great to see Alfred Hitchcock’s (Psycho) quick-witted and devilish 1938 comedy-thriller The Lady Vanishes get the Criterion treatment.

In the movie, beautiful Margaret Lockwood (Night Train to Munich) is traveling across Europe by train when she meets a charming spinster (Dame May Whitty, Suspicion), who then seems to disappear into thin air. The younger woman turns investigator and finds herself drawn into a complex web of mystery, adventure and even some romance.

Co-starring Michael Redgrave (The Browning Version) and Paul Lukas (The Ghost Breakers), The Lady Vanishes remains an audience favorite and one of the great filmmaker’s purest delights.

Criterion’s Blu-ray edition offers a high-definition digital restoration of the classic film with an uncompressed monaural soundtrack.

There are a number of bonus features on the Blu-ray
See full article at Disc Dish »

The Criterion Collection Announce December Blu-ray Slate Including Hitchcock's The Lady Vanishes

The Criterion Collection has just announced its Blu-ray release slate for December and, while it's a bit lighter than usual (only four releases instead of the now almost customary six or seven), it's remains another strong month and an excellent way to end a fantastic year of releases.

Of the four upcoming titles, only one is a new addition to the collection; Ernst Lubitsch's Design for Living. Released in 1933, Design for Living stars Gary Cooper, Miriam Hopkins and Fredric March and is in part a risque romantic comedy while also taking a witty approach towards the individuals' creative pursuits. Lubitsch is a Criterion favorite, and this release should further prove just why that is.

The three remaining releases are all High Definition upgrades of previous Criterion DVDs, and they are quite the lineup. First and foremost we see the incomparable Alfred Hitchcock receive another well deserved high definition release with his 1938 comic thriller,
See full article at TheHDRoom »

‘Night Train to Munich’ – run all the way to hell with a penny, and a broken cigarette

Night Train to Munich

Directed by Carol Reed

United Kingdom, 1940

The title of Carol Reed’s 1940 wartime comedic thriller hardly tells the whole story. Perhaps hoping to capitalize off of the success of the two-years prior The Lady Vanishes, Night Train to Munich would have you believe that it’s an equally contained picture. That famous writers Frank Laudner and Sidney Gilliat wrote both is perhaps then, of no coincidence.

While there is an immensely successful third act that does take place primarily aboard a train, the film is far more sprawling and unfairly overlooked at the expense of its supposed successor.

Scientist Dr. Bomasch (James Harcourt) is forced to free Prague at the invasion of the Nazis. His daughter Anna (Margaret Lockwood) escapes from a concentration camp with the help of fellow internee Karl Marsen (Paul von Hernried) and meets her father in England, where father and daughter take
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Amid election-night drama, there was still a place for county cricket | Martin Kelner

How would Sky Sports News react as the votes were counted on a tense election night?

Those of you familiar with Hitchcock's film The Lady Vanishes may remember the characters played by Basil Radford and Naunton Wayne continuing to obsess about cricket, as war clouds gathered over Europe, and little old ladies bizarrely were put in charge of important messages about troop movements. Well, on election night, I think I found the modern equivalent.

I thought it might be quite fun, as the marathon election programmes began, to turn to Sky Sports News to see if they were even acknowledging that an election was taking place; and blow me if they were not reading out county cricket scores. Having just switched over from some economic expert reporting that in New York the Dow Jones was falling faster than Vanessa Feltz on a bungee rope, it was strangely soothing to find
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ian Carmichael obituary

Actor who brought sympathetic dimensions to the comic twerp Bertie Wooster and the shrewd detective Lord Peter Wimsey

Actor known for his roles as the archetypal blithering Englishman

Playing the archetypal silly ass was the sometimes reluctant business of the stage, film and television actor Ian Carmichael, who has died aged 89. In the public mind he became the best-known postwar example of a characteristic British type - the personally appealing blithering idiot who somehow survives, and sometimes even gets the girl. One of his most characteristic and memorable sorties in this field was his portrayal of Kingsley Amis's Lucky Jim – the anti-hero James Dixon, who savaged the pretensions of academia, as Amis had himself sometimes clashed with academia when he was a lecturer at Swansea. Appearing in John and Roy Boulting's 1957 film, he was able to suggest an unruly but amiable spirit at the end of its tether,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Ian Carmichael obituary

Actor who brought sympathetic dimensions to the comic twerp Bertie Wooster and the shrewd detective Lord Peter Wimsey

Actor known for his roles as the archetypal blithering Englishman

Playing the archetypal silly ass was the sometimes reluctant business of the stage, film and television actor Ian Carmichael, who has died aged 89. In the public mind he became the best-known postwar example of a characteristic British type - the personally appealing blithering idiot who somehow survives, and sometimes even gets the girl. One of his most characteristic and memorable sorties in this field was his portrayal of Kingsley Amis's Lucky Jim – the anti-hero James Dixon, who savaged the pretensions of academia, as Amis had himself sometimes clashed with academia when he was a lecturer at Swansea. Appearing in John and Roy Boulting's 1957 film, he was able to suggest an unruly but amiable spirit at the end of its tether,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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