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Film Review: Tag (2015) by Sion Sono

Film Review: Tag (2015) by Sion Sono
Based on the novel “Real Onigokko” by Yusuke Yamada, which has spawned six other films, “Tag” is another bloodthirsty trip by one of the masters of the category, Sion Sono.

The film starts in a fashion expected from Sion Sono, as a bus filled with schoolgirls is torn in half along with them, by something that seems like wind, in a bloodbath that leaves only Mitsuko standing. The cutting in half of schoolgirls continues for a while, until Mitsuko arrives in a school where Aki greets her, although she cannot remember who she is. The story continues in that fashion, with the protagonist finding herself in different settings, in one as Keiko, a woman who is about to get married, and in another as Izumi, a runner. The rest of the movies is a sequence of battles and constant running, in a story that is quite hard to follow.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

‘Spare Parts’ Blu-ray Review

‘Spare Parts’ Blu-ray Review
Stars: Julian Richings, Michelle Argyris, Emily Alatalo, Jason Rouse, Kiriana Stanton, Chelsea Muirhead, Ryan Allen, Kathryn Kohut | Written by David Murdoch, Svet Rouskov | Directed by Andrew Thomas Hunt

In a godforsaken bar in the middle of nowhere – an all-girl punk band, Ms. 45, rip the stage apart with their anarchy spirit. Their performance impresses an enthusiastic fan who lures the girls into a trap, sedates them, and starts… customizing them. The four wake up with an axe, drill or chainsaw attached to one arm and are forced to fight gladiator-style, in an arena-style auto-wrecking yard for the amusement of the Emperor and his sadistic townsfolk. The women must now truly band together and use all of their talents if they’re going to get out alive.

There’s been something of a surge in female-led “cult” genre fare – mainly emanating from down under, films like Monstro Del Mar, Murder Drome, Fight
See full article at Nerdly »

Film Review: Anatomia Extinction (1995) by Yoshihiro Nishimura

Film Review: Anatomia Extinction (1995) by Yoshihiro Nishimura
Yoshihiro Nishimura is a rather unique artist, particularly since his work in SFX, makeup, designing and directing has deemed the genre of splatter as a highly artistic form, in an accomplishment very few can boast of, and probably none to the degree he has managed to do so. In that regard, it is quite interesting to see where it all started, and “Anatomia Extrinction”, an independently produced movie that Nishimura wrote, directed and did the special effects for, and which eventually became the base for probably his most famous work, “Tokyo Gore Police”, provides a great start point. The film was shown at the Yubari International Fantastic Film Festival in February 1995, where it won a Special Jury Award.

“Anatomia Extinction” is available from Error 4444

The story takes place in an undisclosed time in the near future, when Tokyo is suffering from overpopulation and overcrowding, with the psychological effect on people being rather intense,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Interview with Eihi Shiina: I Would Like to Try to Become Asami Yamazaki Again. I Would Like to Make “Audition” Part Two

Interview with Eihi Shiina: I Would Like to Try to Become Asami Yamazaki Again. I Would Like to Make “Audition” Part Two
Eihi Shiina is a Japanese fashion model and actress from Fukuoka, Japan. She got her first big break in 1995, working for Benetton, after which she represented Japan at the global Elite Model Look ’95. More magazine work followed.

Shiina made her film debut in 1998 with “Open House”. She also published a book of photographs and poems, entitled “No Filter, Only Eyes”, that same year. She is recognized internationally for her role as Asami Yamazaki in Takashi Miike’s “Audition”, and as the vengeful police officer Ruka in Yoshihiro Nishimura’s “Tokyo Gore Police”. Apart from her many collaborations with Yoshihiro Nishimura, she has also acted in Shinji Aoyama’s “Eureka” and Takeshi Kitano’s “Outrage”.

You can follow her on Facebook and Instagram

We speak with her about taking a break from the industry, her collaborations with Takashi Miike, Yoshihiro Nishimura, Takeshi Kitano and Shinji Aoyama, being a model and an actor,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Top 40 Asian Horror Films of the Decade (2011-2020)

Top 40 Asian Horror Films of the Decade (2011-2020)
Over the last decade, Asian horror cinema has become a major cultural export that has breached the international markets, as more exposure than ever before has shown off the immense talent making genre films over the years. Getting a chance to see the work of many different individuals in this part of the world has highlighted the work of Yeon Sang-ho, Joko Anwar, Kimo Stamboel, Timo Tjahjanto and Yoshihiro Nishimura, to name just a few, from out of the shadows of their home countries to the world at large.

Several trends emerged throughout the decade as time rolled on. The first is the South Korean onslaught of talent that emerged where the country ascended to the top of the genre market, and international acclaim and awards followed. They proved time and again that they were developing a core of talented and creative technicians that churned out some of the most
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Tokyo Dragon Chef review – ramen-themed yakuza musical comedy

Tokyo Dragon Chef review – ramen-themed yakuza musical comedy
Yoshihiro Nishimura throws every ingredient into this overblown, overcooked and oddly endearing underworld romp

Cult Japanese filmmaker Yoshihiro Nishimura, who started off doing special effects before moving into the director’s chair, is best known for pulpy, action-horror fare with self-explanatory titles such as Mutant Girls Squad and Tokyo Gore Police, as well as the more enigmatically monikered Meatball Machine Kodoku.

Tokyo Dragon Chef, I’m assuming, lies tonally between the one about gore police and the one about meatball machines given it’s about a pair of ageing yakuza thugs, Ryu (Yasukaze Motomiya) and Tatsu (Yoshiyuki Yamaguchi), who decide to open a ramen restaurant. Their speciality, which does indeed look darn tasty, is a recipe Tatsu honed while doing time and working in the prison’s mess hall, a kind of ma po tofu with ramen.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

January 2021 Terracotta titles: Tokyo Dragon Chef, Bad Genius, A Frozen Flower, and More

January 2021 Terracotta titles: Tokyo Dragon Chef, Bad Genius, A Frozen Flower, and More
Available for release, DVD, Digital

Tokyo Dragon Chef – available on DVD and Digital

From us: Yoshihiro Nishimura directs another preposterous combination, this time mixing yakuza, food, musical and exploitation in the most insane matter, and through a rather low budget approach that did not allow him to present his trademark special effects. The characters, however, are as absurdly hilarious as they can come, with the whole concept of the hardcore yakuza trying to be kind to their customers and hiring influencers to help them, being both extremely funny and a kind of social comment regarding social media and the fate of failed/retired yakuza. (Panos Kotzathanasis)

Deliver Us From Evil – avail. for release now

Distributor: Signature Entertainment

From us: Overall, this is an entertaining action movie featuring two strong and likeable leads, although the predictable set-ups are sloppy and the story offers nothing new. In fact it’s similar to Wilson Yip’s “Paradox,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Crazy Japanese action comedy Tokyo Dragon Chef gets a trailer, poster and images

Terracotta Distribution has shared a trailer, poster and images for the crazy Japanese action comedy Tokyo Dragon Chef, the latest film from director Yoshihiro Nishimura (Tokyo Gore Police), ahead of its UK release this January; check them out here… Retired Yakuzas open a ramen restaurant and become an overnight sensation, thanks to their recipe developed […]

The post Crazy Japanese action comedy Tokyo Dragon Chef gets a trailer, poster and images appeared first on Flickering Myth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film Review: Tokyo Dragon Chef (2020) by Yoshihiro Nishimura

Film Review: Tokyo Dragon Chef (2020) by Yoshihiro Nishimura
Yoshihiro Nishimura continues to bring his absurdly grotesque imagination on the big screen with “Tokyo Dragon Chef”, although this time, in a fashion much tamer than “Helldriver” or “Kodoku Meatball Machine” but equally fun and nonsensical.

Ex yakuza members Ryu and Tatsu reconnect after the latter is released from prison, following the dismemberment of their and a number of other gangs by a group wearing masks of eye bulbs, led by a mysterious young man named Gizumo. Ryo convinces Tatsu to open up a ramen restaurant and the two embark in their paths as host and cook respectively. Their shop quickly becomes a success, after a young girl helps them with marketing, in the most illogical way. However, Jin and Kazu, two brothers who also happen to be their rivals from yakuza days, open a ramen canteen nearby and after hiring a rather unusual girl influencer to promote their shop,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Terracotta Distribution announces the release of Japanese action comedy Tokyo Dragon Chef

Terracotta Distribution announces the release of Japanese action comedy Tokyo Dragon Chef
Terracotta Distribution are delighted to announce the release of their insane Japanese action comedy, “Tokyo Dragon Chef“. Behind the camera is renowned director, Yoshihiro Nishimura, responsible for cult hits such as “Tokyo Gore Police” and “Meatball Machine

“Tokyo Dragon Chef” is a hilarious and bonkers infusion of Blues Brothers and Tampopo – martial arts, music and of course, ramen!

Synopsis

Retired Yakuzas open a ramen restaurant and become an overnight sensation, thanks to their recipe developed in prison. But a mysterious upstart gang is taking down every Yakuza family one by one, drawing the chefs back into the gangland underworld once more!

Terracotta Distribution owner Joey Leung was thrilled that the film will be reaching UK audiences.”Everyone needs their spirits lifted at the moment and this blend of Yakuza rivalry, culinary success story and colourful musical are the much needed ingredients for a crazy, uplifting recipe that
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Frightfest 2020: ‘Spare Parts’ Review

Frightfest 2020: ‘Spare Parts’ Review
Stars: Julian Richings, Michelle Argyris, Emily Alatalo, Jason Rouse, Kiriana Stanton, Chelsea Muirhead, Ryan Allen, Kathryn Kohut | Written by David Murdoch, Svet Rouskov | Directed by Andrew Thomas Hunt

In a godforsaken bar in the middle of nowhere – an all-girl punk band, Ms. 45, rip the stage apart with their anarchy spirit. Their performance impresses an enthusiastic fan who lures the girls into a trap, sedates them, and starts… customizing them. The four wake up with an axe, drill or chainsaw attached to one arm and are forced to fight gladiator-style, in an arena-style auto-wrecking yard for the amusement of the Emperor and his sadistic townsfolk. The women must now truly band together and use all of their talents if they’re going to get out alive.

There’s been something of a surge in female-led “cult” genre fare – mainly emanating from down under, films like Monstro Del Mar, Murder Drome, Fight
See full article at Nerdly »

21st Japan-Filmfest Hamburg will be Online, 19th Aug – 2nd Sep

21st Japan-Filmfest Hamburg will be Online, 19th Aug – 2nd Sep
After much thought, and taking into consideration the health of our guests and viewers, Nihon Media announced that Japan Filmfest Hamburg cannot take place this year as a traditional film festival – and will be online instead. Under the motto ‘Breaking Free – From Japan with Love’, Nihon Media will collaborate with Videocity to stream its entire programme of 70+ films in around 40 blocks globally from 19th of August to the 2nd of September.

The 2020 film programme features 70 current productions, from full-length feature films to experimental short films, including many German, European, and international premieres. Most of the films are shown in the original Japanese language with English subtitles. One special highlight of our programme is the gangster-ballad originally planned as the opening film for the 21st Jffh, “Paradise Next” (2018) from director and film composer Yoshihiro Hanno (“Flowers of Shanghai”). An atmospheric road-movie about the travels of three lost souls living on the edges of society,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Vault Shorts #8

Vault Shorts #8
Crying Free Sex (2017) by Tomohiro Iwasaki (15.11 minutes)

Japan has always been the foremost movie industry in the production of curios to the point of wtf movies, and “Crying Free Sex” definitely continues this legacy.

The totally absurd script revolves around two secret agents, Naomi and Cobra, who, before embarking on their mission, decide to have sex, after the instigation of the former. However, the woman does not realize that the issue with Cobra’s genitalia, that has actually given his nickname, will bring them so much trouble. Soon, they find themselves stuck (you know what I mean) and having to face scores of enemies that include agents in black suits and samurais, as they embark on a trip that brings in a number of places.

Taking the sex and shooting scene from Michael Davis’s “Shoot “Em Up” as its base (parodying it actually), Tomohiko Iwasaki directs a truly preposterous film,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Interview with Norman England: Japan Is Full of Sexualized Images

Interview with Norman England: Japan Is Full of Sexualized Images
*The interview took place on December 2017

Norman England started his career in show business as a guitar and keyboard player for the New York based band Proper iD. In 1993 he moved permanently to Japan, where he began working as a journalist. In 1998 he spent a week on the set of George A. Romero’s TV commercial for the video game Resident Evil 2 and in 1999 became the Japan correspondent for Fangoria, a U.S magazine devoted to horror, splatter and exploitation movies. As a journalist he has worked for a number of magazines such as Hobby Japan, Japanzine, Flix, Japanese Giants, the Japan Times, Eiga Hiho, e.t.c.

Since 1999, he has visited over 35 film sets in Japan, including The Grudge, Gamera 3 and the entire Godzilla Millennium series, with an extended stay for Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah, where he visited the set almost continuously from April to October of
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: Woman of the Photographs (2020) by Takeshi Kushida

Sometimes the best fever dreams are the ones that leave you hanging in disbelief, dangling off a precipice as one hand tries to clamber to something firm and familiar. They have the tendency to tease and tease until they explode with kaleidoscopic intensity. Occasionally they spell everything out to you with barely a moment of hesitation and become completely enveloped in their symbolism; their crazed detachment from reality, however, becomes too inviting to be phased by this. Enter the strange microcosm of Takeshi Kushida’s “Woman of the Photographs”, as a mild-mannered voyage of self-projection, self-image, and self-worth becomes unsettlingly unhinged to the point of no return.

“Woman of the Photographs” is screening at Osaka Asian Film Festival

Kai (Seinendan Company’s Hideki Nagai as a brilliantly understated blank canvas) is a creature of habit. When he’s not retouching the pictures of insecure women for matchmaking services, he tends to his pet praying mantis,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: Helldriver (2010) by Yoshihiro Nishimura

Helldriver” is another preposterous splatter film by the master of the genre, Yoshihiro Nishimura, this time engaging on zombies.

The “story” unfolds as follows: Taku and his sister Rikka are a couple of roaming sadistic murderers who eventually decide to kill her abandoned husband. During the act, his daughter Kika arrives and attacks the couple. Subsequently, a meteorite falls on Rikka, releasing a toxic gas that transforms every resident of northern Japan into a zombie, and her into their queen. Some years later, the country is split in half by a wall that separates the healthy population of the south part from the zombies in the north. The government hires Kika, who is now a skilled zombie killer, to lead a team of outlaws to the north, to kill the zombie queen.

Not to forget, the only way for someone to kill a zombie is to cut
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: Colonel Panics (2016) by Cho Jinseok

The film revolves around two men, who seem to be living in different timelines. The first one, Kaito, is living in the present and is a writer for a political magazine with a nationalistic line. Despite his seemingly regular persona of a dedicated employee who occasionally drinks with his friends, he has another, quite dark and perverse one. He keeps stalking Kuniko, an ex-colleague in university he used to have an affair with, who is now a very successful author. Furthermore, he has regular sex sessions with Yumi, a prostitute, where he is dressed in a Japanese military uniform and she is made to act in various, submissive roles, at least when he is not masturbating with a tube-like gadget. Even more than that, he seems to hide a rage in him, which is bound to be released at some point. This moment comes when a colleague declines his invitation to dinner.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Trailer for New Yoshihiro Nishimura Film “Welcome to Japan”

Japanese director Yoshihiro Nishimura has completed production on his most recent film “Welcome to Japan”. The film showcases the signature over the top violence of Nishimura that has won him a dedicated fan base.

“Welcome to Japan” is set for release this October in Japan. A trailer for the production has been made available and can be viewed below. You can also read our interview with Yoshihiro Nishimura here.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: Kodoku Meatball Machine (2017) by Yoshihiro Nishimura

I consider Yoshihiro Nishimura the undisputed master of Japanese splatter, a man who had moved the genre forward into new and exciting paths through all his roles in similar films, which include Special Effects, Makeup, animation and directing, among others. The fact that he was going to revive 2005 “Meatball Machine” , where he was in charge of special effects, was one of the greatest piece of news for me, and the outcome justified my feelings totally.

“Kodoku Meatball Machine” screened as part of the Asian selection at Fantasia International Film Festival

Yuji is a 50-year-old bill collector and he truly sucks at it, as he cannot get money from anyone he has to, and occasionally he is even stripped from his own. Furthermore, he lives alone, and everyone in his life seems to try to take advantage of him. His boss, his mother, Kaoru, a girl from his bookstore he seems
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Filmart: 'Rise Of The Machine Girls' fires up Nikkatsu slate

The film is a remake of Noboru Iguchi’s cult action thriller The Machine Girl.

Japan’s Nikkatsu is launching sales at Filmart on Rise Of The Machine Girls, a remake of Noboru Iguchi’s cult action feature The Machine Girl.

Directed by Yuki Kobayashi (Death Row Family), the new film stars Himena Tsukimiya, Kanon Hanakage and Tak. It is produced by Yoshinori Chiba, who also produced Iguchi’s 2008 original, and Yoshihiro Nishimura (Tokyo Gore Police).

In the new version, Ami and her sister Yoshie are scraping by doing fight shows when Yoshie is captured by female killing machines during
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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