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The 20 Best Holiday Films of All Time Ranked, from ‘Bad Santa’ to ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’

  • Indiewire
The 20 Best Holiday Films of All Time Ranked, from ‘Bad Santa’ to ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’
As the party in power continues to wrongly correct “Happy Holidays” wishers with “Merry Christmas,” we’d like to offer you a diverse round-up of our favorite seasonal fare, plucked from different parts of the calendar and with a wealth of genres that speak to the crossover power of seasonally appropriate joy. Regretfully, Hollywood continues to crank out Christmas movie after Christmas movie, ignoring many other wonderful traditions and skewing our pool of options in the process.

We debated admitting entries to this list that had either a single festive scene (“Call My by Your Name”) or happen to take place during the present-buying season (“Die Hard”), but ultimately decided to go with ones that explicitly stuck to the winter holidays (Garry Marshall’s greeting card-company approved late work — “Valentine’s Day,” “New Year’s Eve,” and “Mother’s Day” — still did not make the cut). So our roll call
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Christmas Movies Available on Amazon Prime

Alec Bojalad Nov 9, 2019

Get in the Christmas spirit with the best Christmas movies available for streaming on Amazon Prime

Sleighbells ringing, chestnuts open on a roasted fire, you on your couch in front of a television as it moves onto to its 11th consecutive hour of Christmas programming. We all know the various traditions of the season.

further reading: Christmas Movies: A Complete Holiday Streaming Guide

Where once you were beholden to watching A Christmas Story four times in a row on TV every Christmas, now thanks to the magic of streaming you've got more options. Services like Amazon Prime are here to help you have the merriest Christmas possible.

Here is our list of the best Christmas movies on Amazon Prime. We trust that you'll take a break from your holiday binging to point out titles we've missed.

Bad Santa

God bless the movies whose titles are essentially their premise.
See full article at Den of Geek »

It's the real thing by Anne-Katrin Titze

Caveh Zahedi: "I think honesty is the most subversive thing you can do in this world." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

An episode spoofing Spike Jonze and Viceland with Emmy Harrington as "Slut Machine" from Caveh Zahedi's spine-chilling The Show About The Show was a highlight of this year's Tribeca Film Festival N.O.W. Showcase.

Person to Person director Dustin Guy Defa (in Matías Piñeiro's Hermia & Helena), Eléonore Hendricks (Peter Brunner's To the Night with Caleb Landry Jones), Alex Karpovsky (Jess Bond's Rosy with Stacy Martin), Kentucker Audley (Celia Rowlson-Hall's Ma and Charles Poekel's Christmas, Again), Sam Stillman, editor Peter Rinaldi, Applesauce director Onur Tukel and his cinematographer Jason Banker, Amanda Field, and even IndieWire's Eric Kohn have been seduced by the creator to play themselves or others.

"I feel that way about all my films, not just this one. I think they're all a perfect expression of me.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Christmas Movies: A Complete Holiday Streaming Guide

Alec Bojalad Nov 17, 2019

Not enough holiday cheer on TV? We have a complete guide to streaming Christmas movies right here for you!

So, maybe there isn't enough Christmas and holiday programming on TV for your liking. We get it. You can't be stuck at the mercy of broadcasters and cable networks all the time, not when there are so many Christmas movies to watch, right?

Well, because we're a little crazy, we're working on an index of every Christmas movie and other piece of seasonally appropriate holiday-themed film available on various streaming services. Just bookmark this page, scroll on through the alphabetical list, hit the links, and it can be Christmas whenever you need it to be! And if you spot some stuff that we missed, just let us know in the comments and we'll see about getting it all added for you.

So, here's how this works. We've got
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Tree Man’ Exclusive Trailer: New Documentary Explores The Lives of New York Christmas Tree Sellers

  • Indiewire
‘Tree Man’ Exclusive Trailer: New Documentary Explores The Lives of New York Christmas Tree Sellers
In just a little over a month, Christmas season will be upon us, which means warm fires, caroling and, of course, Christmas trees. Every season, hundreds of Christmas tree sellers from across North American come to New York City to ply their trade on the streets. Jon Reiner and Brad Rothschild’s new documentary “Tree Man” explores the lives of those tree sellers, many of whom leave their homes and families behind and must endure living out of cars and vans for the holiday season. The film primarily follows François, a father of three from Québec, who returns to the same Manhattan street corner every year to deliver the magic of the season. Watch an exclusive trailer for the film below.

Read More: Sundance Review: Low-Key And Wistful ‘Christmas, Again’

Co-director Brad Rothschild is best known as a producer of such films like “Homeland,” about the love story of an
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Dad Day’ Exclusive Clip: Factory 25’s First Comedy Series Examines What It Takes To Be a ‘Real’ New Yorker

‘Dad Day’ Exclusive Clip: Factory 25’s First Comedy Series Examines What It Takes To Be a ‘Real’ New Yorker
Factory 25 announced today the BricTV premiere of the comedy series “Dad Day” created by Craig Butta and James Mennella. The six-episode series marks the first narrative series produced by Factory 25 as well as the first series directed and staring Butta, whose previous acting credits include Alex Ross Perry’s “Listen Up Philip” and Charles Poekel’s “Christmas, Again.”

Read More: Factory 25 Acquires Wfmu Doc ‘Sex and Broadcasting’

The series follows Craig (Butta) and James (Artie Brennan) as they struggles with fatherhood and friendship in a continually gentrifying New York. The guys want James’ son Henry to be raised like an authentic New Yorker and each episode explores what exactly that means nowadays, and how to best instill local values in a place that doesn’t resemble your home anymore.

“Dad Day is a pure look at modern man in modern Brooklyn,” says director Alex Ross Perry. “Vulgar, sad and at times absurd,
See full article at Indiewire »

A Conversation With Joel Potrykus (The Alchemist Cookbook)

(Charles Poekel caught up with Joel Potrykus at Bam Cinemafest regarding his latest film The Alchemist Cookbook. The result is the following chat which is one of the best interviews you’ll read all year! Potrykus’ film is available Now in a pay-what-you-want format.) I caught up with Joel Potrykus (Buzzard, Ape) after his newest film, The Alchemist Cookbook, played […]
See full article at Hammer to Nail »

New to Streaming: ‘The Invitation,’ ‘Joy,’ ‘Summer Interlude,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Christmas, Again (Charles Poekel)

Christmas time is a lonely time for many; a “time of giving” that reminds more than a few of us what we’ve lost. This is the feeling Christmas, Again wades in, as produced, written and directed by Charles Poekel. We follow Noel (Kentucker Audley), who’s selling Christmas trees on a Manhattan curb for the fifth winter in a row. He
See full article at The Film Stage »

Daily | Lola, Portuguese Cinema

The new issue of Lola features work by the late Peter von Bagh and on Max Ophüls, Terrence Malick, Aoyama Shinji, Wang Bing and more. And the new issue of Cinema Comparat/ive Cinema focuses on Portuguese cinema and the work of Manoel de Olivera, Pedro Costa, Paolo Rocha and António Reis. Also in today's roundup: Quentin Tarantino and Paul Thomas Anderson discuss 70mm and more, plus interviews with Caveh Zahedi and Charles Poekel, early word on new projects by Christopher Nolan and Hirokazu Koreeda, best-of-2015 lists from Jonathan Rosenbaum and others, a review of David Thomson's new book, How to Watch a Movie—and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Lola, Portuguese Cinema

The new issue of Lola features work by the late Peter von Bagh and on Max Ophüls, Terrence Malick, Aoyama Shinji, Wang Bing and more. And the new issue of Cinema Comparat/ive Cinema focuses on Portuguese cinema and the work of Manoel de Olivera, Pedro Costa, Paolo Rocha and António Reis. Also in today's roundup: Quentin Tarantino and Paul Thomas Anderson discuss 70mm and more, plus interviews with Caveh Zahedi and Charles Poekel, early word on new projects by Christopher Nolan and Hirokazu Koreeda, best-of-2015 lists from Jonathan Rosenbaum and others, a review of David Thomson's new book, How to Watch a Movie—and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

‘Christmas, Again’ Director Charles Poekel Talks Running a Tree Stand and Creating Warmth

Just in time for a post-Christmas read, here’s a conversation with Charles Poekel, the writer/director of Christmas, Again, a wonderful little movie about a lonely Christmas tree salesman, played by Kentucker Audley.

Poekel’s been working in the industry for years, moving from documentary to narrative fiction in his directorial debut. We talk about that transition, owning a Christmas tree stand and making Christmas lights look like tiny Christmas trees. Check out the conversation below.

So you still have that tree stand where you filmed the movie?

Yeah, yeah. I think this is the last year I’m going to do it. I’m doing it still just kind of — well, I enjoy it. I kind of fell in love with it. But also for promotional tie-ins with the movie and that kind of stuff. So a lot of my customers are excited about the movie so that
See full article at The Film Stage »

The 50 Most Overlooked Films of 2015

There are a multitude of reasons why any film may get unfairly overlooked. It could be a lack of marketing resources to give it a substantial push, or, due to a minuscule roll-out, not enough critics and audiences to be the champions it might require. It could simply be the timing of the picture itself; even in the world of studio filmmaking, some features take time to get their due. With an increasingly crowded marketplace, there are more reasons than ever that something might not find an audience and, as with last year, we’ve rounded up the releases that deserved more attention.

Note that all the below films made less than $1 million at the domestic box office at the time of posting (VOD figures are not accounted for, as they normally aren’t made public) and are, for the most part, left out of most year-end conversations. Sadly, most
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Best Directorial Debuts of 2015

While we aim to discuss a wide breadth of films each year, few things give us more pleasure than the arrival of bold, new voices. It’s why we venture to festivals and pore over a variety of different features that might bring to light some emerging talent. This year was an especially notable time for new directors making their stamp, and we’re highlighting the handful of 2015 debuts that most impressed us.

This shouldn’t discount the breakthrough directors behind such films as Buzzard; Tangerine; It Follows; Heaven Knows What; Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter; Man From Reno; and Spring, to name some we liked, but considering that they all have at least two features under their belts, we’re strictly focusing on first-timers here. Below, one can check out a list spanning a variety of different genres and distributions, from those that barely received a theatrical release to wide bows.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Daily | Interviews | Bordwell, Coppola, Maddin

Peter Labuza's wide-ranging conversation with David Bordwell heads up today's roundup of interviews that includes two vintage items: John Malkovich in 1989 and George Lucas just before the 1977 premiere of Star Wars. More recent interviewees: Francis Ford Coppola, Charlie Kaufman, Guy Maddin, Park Chan-wook, Radu Muntean, Charlotte Rampling, Lily Tomlin, Radu Jude, Chaitanya Tamhane, Charles Poekel, Jacques Audiard, Laszlo Nemes, Atom Egoyan, Leonardo DiCaprio, Danny Boyle—and cinematographer Jimmy Gimferrer talks about working with Albert Serra. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Interviews | Bordwell, Coppola, Maddin

Peter Labuza's wide-ranging conversation with David Bordwell heads up today's roundup of interviews that includes two vintage items: John Malkovich in 1989 and George Lucas just before the 1977 premiere of Star Wars. More recent interviewees: Francis Ford Coppola, Charlie Kaufman, Guy Maddin, Park Chan-wook, Radu Muntean, Charlotte Rampling, Lily Tomlin, Radu Jude, Chaitanya Tamhane, Charles Poekel, Jacques Audiard, Laszlo Nemes, Atom Egoyan, Leonardo DiCaprio, Danny Boyle—and cinematographer Jimmy Gimferrer talks about working with Albert Serra. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

‘Christmas, Again’ Review: Spirit Award Nominee Mixes Holiday Melancholy With Comfort and Joy

  • The Wrap
‘Christmas, Again’ Review: Spirit Award Nominee Mixes Holiday Melancholy With Comfort and Joy
Films about the Yuletide season often go right for the big emotional moment, whether it’s a reformed Ebenezer Scrooge vowing to find the best doctors for Tiny Tim or the citizens of Bedford Falls rallying together to save George Bailey’s loan company. Not all holiday films necessarily traffic in this brand of grandiloquence, but often, for filmmakers, ’tis the season to be either jolly or maudlin in very broad strokes. So don’t make assumptions based on the title “Christmas, Again,” the Spirit Award nominee that marks the feature directorial debut of documentary filmmaker Charles Poekel. Delicate and restrained,
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Christmas, Again’ Lead Kentucker Audley on Withholding Expression and the Magic of Holiday Movies

In the new indie Christmas, Again, writer/director Charles Poekel finds the space between the sadness and hopefulness the holiday season brings to most. And it’s the film’s lead Noel, played by Kentucker Audley, who carries the weight of this tone. A sad young man selling Christmas trees with an apparent refusal to smile, Audley does a lot without doing too much, Poekel clearly respectful of his actor’s talents.

Speaking with Audley shortly after Thanksgiving, it’s clear the respect is mutual. Check out our conversation below for the film now in limited release and available on VOD.

The Film Stage: How does the script for Christmas, Again get to you?

Kentucker Audley: Initially, I think, what drew me to the project was the unusual setting and this authenticity that Charlie [Poekel], the director, brought to it, by going through the process of owning his own Christmas tree stand.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The 9 Indies to Watch on VOD This December: 'The Wannabe,' 'Life' and More

The 9 Indies to Watch on VOD This December: 'The Wannabe,' 'Life' and More
Read More: The 11 Indie Films You Must See This December: 'The Hateful Eight,' 'Anomalisa' and More "Christmas, Again" (December 3) The traditional holiday movie builds towards some climactic takeaway: A troubled character finds new value through the convenience of the Christmas spirit. "Christmas, Again," the bittersweet debut from writer-director Charles Poekel, is a welcome deviation from that tendency. Starring indie stalwart Kentucker Audley ("Sun Don't Shine") as a downtrodden loner selling Christmas trees in Brooklyn in the aftermath of a breakup, and the fleeting connection he finds with a fellow lost soul, the movie makes no grand gestures but provides a satisfactory arrangement of many small ones. Shot on grainy 16mm by cinematographer Sean Price Williams ("Listen Up Phillip"), "Christmas, Again" offers the unique pairing of vibrant holiday colors with a foundation of gritty realism built around its...
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: Trailer For Indie Spirit Award Nominated 'Christmas, Again'

Well, the Indie Spirit Award nominees have just recently been announced, and some fine films were recognized: everything from awards frontrunners like “Carol” and “Spotlight” to slightly lesser-known but equally rich works like the trans drama “Tangerine” and the shattering coming-of-age tale “James White.” 2015 has been a wonderful year for independent cinema, a fact that is reflected in the many nominations garnered by fantastic films (other films to receive positive attention were Cary Fukunaga’s “Beasts of No Nation” and Lenny Abrahamson’s “Room”). One film that quietly made a splash at the Indie Spirit awards that you might not have heard much about is Charles Poekel’s “Christmas, Again.” Shot by Sean Price Williams (who also lensed Alex Ross Perry's “Queen of Earth”) and starring indie stalwarts Kentucker Audley, Hannah Gross and Jason Shelton, “Christmas, Again” tells the story of Noel, a Christmas tree salesman for whom the
See full article at The Playlist »

Springboard: Why 'Christmas, Again' Filmmaker Charles Poekel Freaked Out Over His Spirit Award Nomination

Springboard: Why 'Christmas, Again' Filmmaker Charles Poekel Freaked Out Over His Spirit Award Nomination
Read More: Review: Brooklyn-Set 'Christmas, Again' is Not Your Typical Holiday Movie Indiewire's Springboard column profiles up-and-comers in the film industry worthy of your attention. The holidays aren't always filled with joy, cheer and goodwill towards others, sometimes they're just kind of sad. Such is the case with Charles Poekel's finely tuned "Christmas, Again," a new kind of holiday movie that neatly straddles the line between heartbreaking and heartwarming, often in the same scene. Starring indie standby Kentucker Audley, "Christmas, Again" follows his appropriately named Noel, a sidewalk Christmas tree salesman who is tasked with selling off holiday greenery to Brooklyn residents while also nursing a broken heart. Noel's tiny world is intruded on by various customers (most of them asking questions that are both wholly ludicrous and entirely believable), his fellow salespeople (incidentally, a young couple who are in love, a grim reminder of the gal...
See full article at Indiewire »
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