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The Most Overlooked Films of 2020

The Most Overlooked Films of 2020
In a year marked by a stagnant box office and distributors experimenting with a wide variety of releases, what does an overlooked film constitute? While there are fewer means than in years past to quantify such a metric, there are still plenty of films that didn’t get their due throughout 2020 and deserve more attention in the weeks, months, years to come.

Sadly, many documentaries would qualify for this list, but we stuck strictly to narrative efforts; one can instead read our rundown of the top docs here. Check out the list below, as presented in alphabetical order. A great deal of the below titles are also available to stream, so check out our feature here to catch up.

A Sun (Chung Mong-hong)

Chung Moog-hong’s A Sun––a rich Taiwanese drama with the texture of a novel––was unceremoniously released on Netflix in the middle of the Sundance Film Festival,
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Best Cinematography of 2020

The Best Cinematography of 2020
“A cinematographer is a visual psychiatrist–moving an audience through a movie […] making them think the way you want them to think, painting pictures in the dark,” said the late, great Gordon Willis. As we continue our year-end coverage, one aspect we must highlight is, indeed, cinematography. From talented newcomers to seasoned professionals, we’ve rounded up the examples that have most impressed us this year. Check out our rundown below.

An Easy Girl (Georges Lechaptois)

The French Riviera is the fitting location for this tale of sexual discovery and class criticism. Georges Lechaptois’ frames are gorgeous not just because of the landscape––we have reoccurring overhead shots of the crystal-blue tides rustling against the beach where characters lay––but the juxtaposition of the quiet life out on the sea. The sun-soaked vistas at lunch are as lively as the quiet, sensuous nights the lovers spend in their dimly lit
See full article at The Film Stage »

Dutch Fund Backs Lucrecia Martel’s ‘Chocobar’; Stockholm Film Fest Awards; ‘We Are Who We Are’ Deals – Global Briefs

  • Deadline
Dutch Fund Backs Lucrecia Martel’s ‘Chocobar’; Stockholm Film Fest Awards; ‘We Are Who We Are’ Deals – Global Briefs
Hubert Bals Fund Grants

The Hubert Bals Fund, the Dutch funder run by International Film Festival Rotterdam, has unveiled its latest round of decisions. A joint initiative by the Netherlands Film Fund and Hubert Bals has granted €50,000 apiece to two films: Lucrecia Martel’s Chocobar, and Gabriel Mascaro’s Centre Of The Earth. Hbf has also selected twelve film projects from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Eastern Europe for their Script and Project Development Scheme, to receive grants with a combined total of €108,000. The full list of backed projects can be accessed here.

Stockholm Ff Winners

This year’s Stockholm International Film Festival has unveiled its award winners, with Berlin Alexanderplatz taking Best Film and Identifying Features director Fernanda Valadez scooping Best Director and Best Debut. Valadez’s pic recently also won the top prize at Thessaloniki film fest, adding to its World Cinema Dramatic Special award from Sundance back in January.
See full article at Deadline »

Lucrecia Martel’s ‘Chocobar’ gets €50K boost in latest Hubert Bals funding round

Lucrecia Martel’s ‘Chocobar’ gets €50K boost in latest Hubert Bals funding round
Selection includes projects from Gabon, Chile, Mongolia and Argentina.

International Film Festival Rotterdam (IFFR)’s Hubert Bals Fund (Hbf) has selected 12 film projects for its 2020 funding round, marking an increase on the 10 selections of previous years.

The 12 projects for the Script and Project Development Scheme hail from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Eastern Europe. Each will receive €9,000 for a total of €108,000 funding.

Selected projects for the development scheme include Tremble Like A Flower from Thai director Pathompon Mont Tesprateep, whose short Lullaby received its European premiere at IFFR 2020.

Also chosen is Gente De Noche from Argentina’s Romina Paula. Paula
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New to Streaming: Francisca, Claire Denis, Divine Love, Art of the Real & More

New to Streaming: Francisca, Claire Denis, Divine Love, Art of the Real & More
With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options—not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves–each week we highlight the noteworthy titles that have recently hit platforms. Check out this week’s selections below and past round-ups here.

Art of the Real 2020

Art of the Real, Film at Lincoln Center’s annual showcase of boundary-pushing non-fiction work, is now underway virtually nationwide. Featuring work by Joshua Bonnetta, Sky Hopinka, Hassen Ferhani, Ignacio Agüero, Lisa Marie Malloy and J.P. Sniadecki, Sérgio da Costa and Maya Kosa, Jonathan Perel, Jessica Sarah Rinland, Pacho Velez and Courtney Stephens, and more, the slate provides a comprehensive survey for finding new cinematic ways to look at the world.

Where to Stream: Film at Lincoln Center’s Virtual Cinema

Coded Bias (Shalini Kantayya)

Starting with the work of Joy Buolamwini of the MIT Media Lab, Shalini Kantayya’s Coded Bias is an alarming
See full article at The Film Stage »

Divine Love | Review

Divine Love | Review
Mighty Aphrodite: Mascaro’s Second Coming Cloaked in Complex Allegory

The Immaculate Conception remains one of the notorious suspensions of disbelief in Christian folklore, and Brazilian director Gabriel Mascaro examines the problematic contradictions of contemporized religion with a pseudo-science fiction lens in his third film, the formidably allegorical Divine Love. Leaving behind the meditative stupor of 2014’s August Winds and the Lynchian ellipses of his beautiful breakout, sophomore venture in 2015’s Neon Bull (read review), Mascaro takes to the mysterious emotional interiors of the urban future with his latest project, which fast-forwards nary a decade into the future with an intimate parable about the second coming of Jesus Christ told through the increasingly complicated restrictions placed upon a present day would-be Mary and Joseph.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

15 Films to See in November

15 Films to See in November
This strange year is now winding down, and while for much of the month all eyes will be turned towards the U.S. election and its aftermath, as we take a glance at the film offerings, there’s no shortage of worthwhile releases.

From the first batch of five new Steve McQueen films to David Fincher’s first feature in six years to new work by Werner Herzog, Clea DuVall, Gabriel Mascaro, Francis Lee, and more, it’s a stellar line-up as we enter into the final stretch of 2020.

We should also note that some theatrical-only releases earlier this fall are making their digital debuts, such as The Nest and Possessor, so be sure to follow our streaming column for weekly updates.

15. The Giant (David Raboy; Nov. 13)

A highlight at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival, David Raboy’s directorial debut The Giant––which follows a young woman who
See full article at The Film Stage »

Divine Love Movie Review

Divine Love Movie Review
Divine Love (Divino Amor) Outsider Pictures & Strand Releasing Reviewed for Shockya.com & BigAppleReviews.net linked from Rotten Tomatoes by: Harvey Karten Director: Gabriel Mascaro Writer: Gabriel Mascaro, Rachel Daisy Ellis, Esdras Bezerra Cast: Dira Paes, Juliio Machado, Antonio Pastich, Rubens Santos, Clayton Mariano Screened at: Critics’ link, NYC, 10/21/20 Opens: November 13, 2020 Maybe it’s […]

The post Divine Love Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

U.S. Trailer for Gabriel Mascaro’s Divine Love Brings Hope for New Life

U.S. Trailer for Gabriel Mascaro’s Divine Love Brings Hope for New Life
One of my favorite films of last year’s Sundance Film Festival is finally getting a U.S. release. Gabriel Mascaro’s strange, alluring Neon Bull follow-up Divine Love is set in the near-future of 2027 in Brazil, following Joana (Dira Paes), a deeply religious woman who is trying to conceive a child by any means necessary. Through his exquisite vision, Mascaro tells a curious tale of spiritual commitment, marital strife, and the blurred separation of church and state, leading to an ultimately surprising, powerful conclusion. Ahead of a November 13 release in theaters and virtual cinemas, the new trailer has arrived.

I said in my Sundance review, “After sprinkling magical realist touches in his prior film Neon Bull, the director’s imagination is once again deployed with full force here. With it being only eight years in the future, his predictions are rightfully minor but artfully woven into the environment for maximum realism.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival unveils digital events

Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival unveils digital events
Virtual retrospective and Laliff Connect to include features, shorts, episodics, masterclasses, musical performances.

The Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival (Laliff) will host a virtual retrospective of its 2019 edition from April 14 to May 4 in anticipation of its 2020 virtual edition, Laliff Connect, set to run from May 5-31.

Both events will include features, shorts, episodics (retrospective only), masterclasses and musical performances and will be available on Laliff’s website for free, with additional titles to be announced.

Screenings include The Last Rafter by Carlos Rafael Betancourt and Oscar Ernesto Ortega, and Paper Children by Alexandra Codina with a special virtual event
See full article at ScreenDaily »

“The Directors I Work With Prefer a Natural Approach”: Dp Diego García at Rotterdam 2020

“The Directors I Work With Prefer a Natural Approach”: Dp Diego García at Rotterdam 2020
Because of the nature of the business, a cinematographer often has a more eclectic body of work than an actor or a director, and it is not unusual to see their work span continents. Even by these standards, however, Diego García’s filmography is quite impressive: His last four credits are Carlos Reygadas’s Our Time, Gabriel Mascaro’s Divine Love, Nicolas Winding Refn’s Too Old to Die Young, and Yorgos Lanthimos’s short film Nimic—four films produced in four different countries by directors with four different mother tongues. It isn’t surprising, then, to hear that García is particularly attentive to a director’s body of […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

“The Directors I Work With Prefer a Natural Approach”: Dp Diego García at Rotterdam 2020

“The Directors I Work With Prefer a Natural Approach”: Dp Diego García at Rotterdam 2020
Because of the nature of the business, a cinematographer often has a more eclectic body of work than an actor or a director, and it is not unusual to see their work span continents. Even by these standards, however, Diego García’s filmography is quite impressive: His last four credits are Carlos Reygadas’s Our Time, Gabriel Mascaro’s Divine Love, Nicolas Winding Refn’s Too Old to Die Young, and Yorgos Lanthimos’s short film Nimic—four films produced in four different countries by directors with four different mother tongues. It isn’t surprising, then, to hear that García is particularly attentive to a director’s body of […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Another layer by Anne-Katrin Titze

Another layer by Anne-Katrin Titze
Juliano Dornelles on Michael in Bacurau: “When Udo Kier’s character said to the outsiders about the Brazilian collaborators, ‘They don’t speak Brazilian here.’ Brazilian, it’s not a name.”

In celebration of the theatrical release of Bacurau in New York, Kleber Mendonça Filho and Juliano Dornelles will present Mapping Bacurau, a program of films that include John Sayles’s Lone Star,; Colin Eggleston’s Long Weekend; Paul Morrissey’s Blood For Dracula; 70mm print of John Carpenter’s Starman; Ted Kotcheff’s Wake In Fright, and a 4K restoration of Robin Hardy’s The Wicker Man: The Final Cut.

Kleber Mendonça Filho with Juliano Dornelles on Bacurau: “The horses for us is a very interesting marker that this is a Western. They’re beautiful animals, the way they move.” Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Bacurau, shot by Pedro Sotero, edited by Eduardo Serrano, costumes by Rita Azevedo, with a.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

A heightened state by Anne-Katrin Titze

Kleber Mendonça Filho with Anne-Katrin Titze on Bacurau being set a few years in the future: “It’s a heightened state.” Photo: Juliano Dornelles

In the second part of my in-depth conversation with Kleber Mendonça Filho and Juliano Dornelles on Bacurau, their Cannes Film Festival Jury Prize winner (shared with Ladj Ly’s International Oscar shortlisted film Les Misérables), a Roman Polanski Chinatown connection to the struggles with water shortage in the Northeast of Brazil was made. Kleber commented on George Miller’s original Mad Max from 1979, where the story is set a few years from now, which “puts you in a state of suspension”, noted that we’ve now reached the year Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner from 1982 took place, and marvelled if it hadn’t been a stronger choice to skip the year 2019 and merely set it in a perpetual future.

Juliano Dornelles on Bacurau: “It was always
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Berlin Winner Manuel Abramovich’s “Pornomelancholia” Taps French Funding (Exclusive)

Mexico City — Argentina’s Manuel Abramovich, a 2019 Berlinale Silver Bear winner for “Blue Boy,” has tapped French funding for its follow-up, “Pornomelancholia,” one of the highest-profile projects at Mexico’s Los Cabos Film Festival, which kicks off today with a gala screening of “The Irishman,”

Financing from the Region Nouvelle-Aquitaine, a building film-tv hub in South West France, has been secured by the film’s French co-producer, David Hurst at Dublin Films, which is based out of Bordeaux.

As equity finance from production partners has come to dominate over pre-sales in art film financing, and bring far more funding to the table, the number of producers involved on a project is often a good sign of not only its scale but excitement and perceived potential.

Lead produced by Gema Juárez Allen at Argentina’s Gema Films, “Pornomelanholia” is also co-produced by Rachel Daisy Ellis at Brazil’s Desvia, co-writer and
See full article at Variety »

Outsider Pictures Takes U.S. on ‘Divine Love’ (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Paul Hudson’s Outsider Pictures has acquired North American rights excluding Quebec to “Divine Love,” Brazilian Gabriel Mascaro’s Sundance hit which paints a prescient picture of a near-future faith dominated Brazil.

Outsider is planning a Spring 2020 release for the film. Set in a supposedly near-future brazil, the relevance of the film was felt with force just a few weeks ago when far-right President Jair Bolsonaro announced that he wanted Brazil’s Ancine state film-tv agency to be headed by someone who is “terribly Evangelical.”

Suggesting a major talent in the making, Mascaro’s follow-up to his Venice winner “Neon Bull” world premiered at the Sundance Film Festival to critical acclaim. Guy Lodge predicted “The film’s blend of on-the-button politics and seductive aesthetics should make it hot festival property,” in his Variety review.

Set in 2027, the film follows Joana (Dira Paes), a bureaucrat who uses her job as a
See full article at Variety »

Alfredo Castro, Mia Maestro, Leonor Varela Cast in Francisca Alegria’s Debut (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Alfredo Castro, Mia Maestro, Leonor Varela Cast in Francisca Alegria’s Debut (Exclusive)
Santiago, Chile — The much anticipated feature debut of Chilean Francisca Alegria, renowned for her magical short “And the Whole Sky Fit in the Dead Cow’s Eye,” has firmed up its cast and shooting dates.

Argentine thesp Mia Maestro (“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn”), Chile’s Leonor Varela, Alfredo Castro and rising talent Lucas Balmaceda (“The Prince”) lead the cast.

Inspired by her short, a Sundance sensation where it snagged the Short Film Jury Award in 2017, Alegria’s upcoming feature, “The Cow that Sang a Song About the Future” adapts a similar magical realist tone in a family drama set in the verdant countryside of Valdivia, southern Chile.

Varela plays a single mother, Cecilia, who returns to her childhood home with her 19-year-old son (Balmaceda) where she faces a series of surreal events, including the deaths of hundreds of cows and the reappearance of her long dead mother (Maestro), whose suicide profoundly marked the family.
See full article at Variety »

Tiff 2019 Announces Platform Lineup, Including New Films From Julie Delpy and Alice Winocour

Tiff 2019 Announces Platform Lineup, Including New Films From Julie Delpy and Alice Winocour
The Toronto International Film Festival has announced the fifth edition of its Platform lineup, a director-driven section that aims to showcase original names in international cinema. This year, Platform will screen to 10 feature films, including world premieres from Julie Delpy, Alice Winocour, and Anthony Chen. The section will also host a number of debut films, including Darius Marder’s “Sound of Metal” and David Zonana’s “Workforce.”

Of the 10 features in this year’s selection, 40 percent are directed by women. All but one are world premieres, and they hail from all over the world, including Europe, Latin America, East Asia, and the U.S. Sarah Gavron’s “Rocks,” which follows “a teenager who fears that she and her little brother will be forced apart if anyone finds out they are living alone,” will open the section. The international premiere of Pietro Marcello’s “Martin Eden,” an adaptation of the Jack London
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Les Miserables’ Wins Best Picture at Durban Intl. Film Festival

  • Variety
‘Les Miserables’ Wins Best Picture at Durban Intl. Film Festival
Durban–“Les Misérables,” French director Ladj Ly’s riveting portrayal of racial division and unrest in the banlieues of Paris, won best picture at the 40th Durban Intl. Film Festival Tuesday night.

The jury described the film, which shared the jury prize in Cannes this year, as “a searing portrait of modern France which takes on issues of police brutality, racial tension, and of generations who keep repeating the same mistakes,” heralding its “raw power and complex ideas” while calling it “a piece of bravura filmmaking.” “Les Misérables” also won the award for best screenplay.

Ly’s incendiary film set the tone for a closing ceremony that, as it commemorated Diff’s 40th edition, offered a reminder that a festival born in a spirit of protest against the injustices of apartheid still had a vital role to play in the shaping of the South African and African conscience.

“Diff has
See full article at Variety »

Cannes-Winning Filmmaker Faces Surreal Showdown With Brazilian Government

Cannes-Winning Filmmaker Faces Surreal Showdown With Brazilian Government
The 2019 Cannes Film Festival ended in triumph for Brazil’s Kleber Mendonça Filho, who shared the festival’s Jury Prize with co-director Juliano Dornelles for their dystopian western “Bacurau.” (The film tied with French police thriller “Les Misérables.”)“Bacurau” follows a remote village fighting for survival against invasive forces; now, Mendonça Filho faces another surreal battle back home.

Two weeks before the festival, the Brazilian government announced a 30-day ultimatum for Mendonça Filho to return roughly $500,000 that it provided for this 2012 debut, “Neighboring Sounds.” According to multiple reports in the Brazilian press, the funding was meant to wholly finance the film. However, the government maintains that Mendonça Filho’s final budget was about 50% higher than the maximum allowed under the program.

The filmmaker has been appealing the decision in court ahead of the June 3 deadline. He characterized the government’s latest decree as an attempt to capitalize on his recent publicity at Cannes,
See full article at Indiewire »
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