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‘Asia’ Review: ‘Unorthodox’ Star Shira Haas Shines In Devastating Mother-Daughter Drama [Tribeca]

‘Asia’ Review: ‘Unorthodox’ Star Shira Haas Shines In Devastating Mother-Daughter Drama [Tribeca]
All the signs of a weepy incurable disease movie show themselves early in Asia, Israeli filmmaker Ruthy Pribar‘s tender debut film. But slowly, subtly, Asia sets itself apart from the rest of its sentimental cohorts and shows itself to be a moving and poignant mother-daughter drama of a different kind. Unorthodox breakout star Shira Haas […]

The post ‘Asia’ Review: ‘Unorthodox’ Star Shira Haas Shines In Devastating Mother-Daughter Drama [Tribeca] appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Composer Antonio Gambale (‘Unorthodox’): ‘I looked for instruments that were quite fragile-sounding and also quite broken-sounding’ [Exclusive Video Interview]

Composer Antonio Gambale (‘Unorthodox’): ‘I looked for instruments that were quite fragile-sounding and also quite broken-sounding’ [Exclusive Video Interview]
“They didn’t want anything too epic, too leading in terms of emotion; we didn’t want to be telling people what to feel, but we wanted to help people to engage with the characters,” composer Antonio Gambale reveals in an exclusive interview with Gold Derby about his score for “Unorthodox” on Netflix (watch the video above). He continues via webcam from his home in Paris, “They also very much didn’t want the score to be specifically Jewish or specifically Yiddish or too much about Berlin and techno and that kind of thing or classical music either — all the main worlds of music that are already part of the story because that was already going to be there in the diegetic music.”

Much of Gambale’s contribution to the miniseries is felt in the character themes that he developed and which recur throughout the four episodes, with the one
See full article at Gold Derby »

Listen: ‘Unorthodox’ Star Amit Rahav on Working With Shira Haas, Emmy Buzz and Being a Role Model for Lgbtq Youth

  • Variety
Listen: ‘Unorthodox’ Star Amit Rahav on Working With Shira Haas, Emmy Buzz and Being a Role Model for Lgbtq Youth
Amit Rahav will never forget seeing himself for the first time in full wardrobe and hair and makeup as Yanky, the Hasidic Jew he plays in the Netflix miniseries “Unorthodox.”

“It was wild because I’m very secular and it is quite the opposite of my daily life and style,” Rahav says on this week’s episode of the Variety and iHeart podcast “The Big Ticket.” “Once I put on the clothes and the payot [the sidelocks that Hasidic men grow], I suddenly felt right. In some way, I got to know the character much better.”

Based on Deborah Feldman’s 2012 memoir of the same name, “Unorthodox” stars Shira Haas as Esty, Yanky’s new young wife, who flees her religious community in Brooklyn for a secular life in Berlin. “I read it very quickly because it’s so good,” says Rahav, 24. “It was very important for me to know [Feldman’s] point of view and where she comes from.
See full article at Variety »

Amit Rahav recounts the ‘cool story’ of being cast as ‘Unorthodox’ husband on Netflix [Exclusive Video Interview]

Amit Rahav recounts the ‘cool story’ of being cast as ‘Unorthodox’ husband on Netflix [Exclusive Video Interview]
“It’s a cool story,” Amit Rahav says about how he was cast for his breakout part in the “Unorthodox” miniseries on Netflix. “I was so stressed in school that I said maybe we should skip it because I don’t have a lot of time to practice and learn Yiddish for a five-page scene,” the actor reveals about his audition in his exclusive interview with Gold Derby (watch the video above). Rahav found it “so relieving to know that” the actress who had been cast as his on-screen wife was Shira Haas, a friend of 10 years. She helped Rahav prepare for his audition and he recalls, “We did our lines together in Yiddish and it felt suddenly very special because we ended the scene and we were shocked: ‘Did we just communicate in Yiddish for the first time in our lives’?” Rahav laughs, “We did not know that a month later,
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Unorthodox’ star Shira Haas discusses the ending and her big breakthrough year [Exclusive Video Interview]

‘Unorthodox’ star Shira Haas discusses the ending and her big breakthrough year [Exclusive Video Interview]
“I did not dream of being an actress,” Shira Haas reveals in an exclusive interview about her breakthrough performance in “Unorthodox” (watch the video above). She continues, “I was very, very shy as a child, believe it or not.” Speaking to Gold Derby from Tel Aviv, Haas explains that although she “always loved theater” and “always loved movies,” it was leading the 2014 Israeli film “Princess” that finally convinced her of her career path. “I remember suddenly understanding how you can say so much with saying nothing at all,” she recounts about her feature debut before comparing her own journey to that of her character in “Unorthodox,” who escapes an oppressed life and finds a passion in music. “Like Esty, I found myself suddenly through art,” she laughs.

“This character and this story really made me question a lot about what freedom is and the value of freedom,” Haas says about playing Esty Shapiro.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tribeca Review: Asia is a Poetic Debut Feature With a Pair of Unforgettable Performances

Tribeca Review: Asia is a Poetic Debut Feature With a Pair of Unforgettable Performances
Avoiding the trappings of other melodramas about the short lives of terminally ill teens, Asia is a restrained and nuanced exploration of the relationship between a mother and daughter. Anchored by two knockout performances, Shira Haas (currently starring in Netflix’s Unorthodox) plays the 17-year-old Vika and Alena Yiv is Asia, her 35-year-old single mother who is a nurse working the night shift at a local hospital. Asia immigrated to Israel from Russia, taking her daughter away from an absentee father and, in doing so for reasons that become clear later in the picture, keeps her close to her side.

Asia spends her nights away from Vika working and later we discover picking up on where she may have left off as a young woman: going to bars and having sex with a regular acquaintance on his car on the top of a wooded hill. Vika also experiments with drinking down at a skatepark,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Film News: 2020 Tribeca Film Festival Announces Jury Prizes

Film News: 2020 Tribeca Film Festival Announces Jury Prizes
Chicago – “The show must go on … “ That became the rallying cry of the 2020 Tribeca Film Festival, which was physically postponed because of the Covid pandemic (it was originally scheduled from April 15-26). Despite that unexpected turn, the Festival went online, named juries and awarded honors to films on April 29th.

The top prizes went to “The Half of It,” directed by Alice Wu (Best U.S. Narrative), “The Hater,” directed by Jan Komasa (Best International Narrative) and “Socks on Fire,” directed by Bo McGuire (Best Documentary).

Best U.S. Narrative Feature is ‘The Half of It,’ directed by Alice Wu

Photo credit: Tribeca Film Festival

Awards were distributed in the following feature film competition categories – U.S. Narrative, International Narrative, Documentary, New Narrative Director, and the Nora Ephron Prize, honoring a woman writer or director. Awards were also given in the short film categories – Narrative, Documentary, Student Visionary and Animation.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Tribeca Film Festival: Netflix’s ‘The Half of It’, ‘The Hater’, ‘Socks On Fire’ Among Award Winners For Postponed 2020 Edition

  • Deadline
Tribeca Film Festival: Netflix’s ‘The Half of It’, ‘The Hater’, ‘Socks On Fire’ Among Award Winners For Postponed 2020 Edition
This evening, Tribeca Film Festival revealed the Jury-selected winning titles from the 19th annual confab, which was forced to postpone its originally scheduled April gathering in response to the global health crisis. Top honors went to Alice Wu’s Netflix coming-of-age dramedy The Half of It, which picked up The Founders Award for Best U.S. Narrative Feature, while The Hater was named Best International Narrative Feature, and Socks On Fire nabbed Best Documentary Feature.

In addition, Best U.S narrative feature screenplay went to Anna Kerrigan for Cowboys, a film that also earned a best actor nod for its star Steve Zahn. Assol Abdullina was awarded best actress for her performance in Materna. Also announced were the winners in the shorts program.

Soon after announcing the delay of its 2020 edition, Tribeca Enterprises and Tribeca Film Festival Co-Founder and CEO Jane Rosenthal told Deadline that the org was looking into
See full article at Deadline »

‘The Half of It,’ Steve Zahn, Assol Abdullina Win Awards at 2020 Tribeca Film Festival

  • Variety
‘The Half of It,’ Steve Zahn, Assol Abdullina Win Awards at 2020 Tribeca Film Festival
The Half of It,” a coming-of-age drama written and directed by Alice Wu, and actors Steve Zahn and Assol Abdullina were among the winners of the 2020 Tribeca Film Festival’s slate of juried awards.

The Half of It,” which will be released on Netflix on May 1, follows a shy, straight-a student named Ellie Chu who makes some extra money by writing papers for her high school peers. She reluctantly agrees to write a love letter for a lovesick jock to his crush, a girl Ellie also secretly loves. All three students go on a journey of complicated friendship and self-discovery in the drama-comedy film.

The Polish film “The Hater” by Jan Komasa won for best international narrative feature and “Socks on Fire” directed by Bo McGuire won for best documentary feature.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic halting most in-person award shows, this year’s Tribeca winners were announced on Instagram.
See full article at Variety »

Tribeca Film Festival Gives Jury Awards to ‘The Half of It,’ Steve Zahn Despite Cancellation

Tribeca Film Festival Gives Jury Awards to ‘The Half of It,’ Steve Zahn Despite Cancellation
The Tribeca Film Festival unveiled its awards in the jury competition for the movies that were to show at the postponed festival, recognizing Alice Wu’s “The Half of It” with the top prize in the narrative competition and Steve Zahn with the Best Actor prize for his work in “Cowboys.”

The New York festival was meant to take place April 15-26 for its 19th edition, and while the festival still plans on screening the accepted films in some form in 2020, no details have been set.

The Half of It” was honored with The Founders Award for Best U.S. Narrative Feature. “The Hater” won Best International Narrative Feature, and “Socks On Fire” won Best Documentary Feature.

Also Read: Tribeca Film Festival to Debut Select Programming Online

Shorts awards went to “No More Wings” for Best Narrative Short, “My Father The Mover” for Best Documentary Short, “Friends” for Best Animated
See full article at The Wrap »

Tribeca Film Festival Awards ‘The Half of It,’ ‘Socks on Fire’ Top Honors

Tribeca Film Festival Awards ‘The Half of It,’ ‘Socks on Fire’ Top Honors
Though it postponed its annual in-person gathering, the Tribeca Film Festival on Wednesday handed out awards for the 2020 juried competition. Top narrative and nonfiction honors went to two queer films, Alice Wu’s coming-of-age tale “The Half of It” and Bo McGuire’s hybrid documentary “Socks on Fire,” while Jan Komasa’s “The Hater” won Best International Narrative Feature. Other winners include “Cowboys,” “Materna,” “Kokoloko,” and “Asia.”

In mid-March, festival organizers postponed the festival just weeks before it was set to bow in New York City. In the interim, some programming for the 19th annual festival was made available online, while its brass still hopes to hold a traditional festival in the coming months.

“We are fortunate that technology allowed for our jury to come together this year to honor our filmmakers,” said Tribeca co-founder and CEO Jane Rosenthal in an official statement. “Despite not being able to be together physically,
See full article at Indiewire »

Stream of the Day: ‘Unorthodox’ Fans Should Watch ‘One of Us,’ Another Stirring Real-Life Renouncement

Stream of the Day: ‘Unorthodox’ Fans Should Watch ‘One of Us,’ Another Stirring Real-Life Renouncement
With readers turning to their home viewing options more than ever, this daily feature provides one new movie each day worth checking out on a major streaming platform.

In 2014, documentarians Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady stumbled upon a small article about the New York City-based organization Footsteps, which assists those looking to leave an ultra-Orthodox religion (including both Hasidic and Haredi groups in the Jewish faith). The filmmakers are well known for their ability to earn the trust of cloistered communities (from the Christian extremists of “Jesus Camp” to the tight-knit creative denizens of “Detropia”), and they had long been intrigued by the ultra-Orthodox community that makes up dense pockets of NYC, but had never found a way to crack its insular world. Then they found a program that assists people already looking to leave.

The result of that discovery was “One of Us,” a documentary that focused on a trio of Hasidic Jews,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Blood Quantum’ Review: Indigenous Canadian Zombie Movie Bites Into Colonialism

‘Blood Quantum’ Review: Indigenous Canadian Zombie Movie Bites Into Colonialism
As George Romero first discovered — and hordes of other filmmakers have since refined — zombies are a fun and effective vehicle for addressing the most intractable anxieties of the modern world; even bone-deep social ills have a funny way of seeming more digestible when explored through a story about people rabidly eating each other’s entrails. , Jeff Barnaby’s “Blood Quantum” may bite off more human flesh than it can chew, but this hopeful modern howl against the indignities suffered by Canada’s indigenous population (the Mi’gMaq in particular) is still a credit to its genre. It may not be a great zombie movie, but it’s a uniquely powerful reminder of why zombie movies are great.

Blood Quantum,” a term referring to the genocidal American practice of determining indigeneity by measuring the percentage of a person’s native heritage, sets the stage with what might be the single gnarliest
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Stray’ Review: Dog Lovers Will Drool Over This Profound Canine Love Letter From Turkey

‘Stray’ Review: Dog Lovers Will Drool Over This Profound Canine Love Letter From Turkey
Dogs have been an object of fascination for cinema since its early days, a phenomenon only intensified by the moving images of the social media age. Despite decades of competition, however, “Stray” stands out for inhabiting their point of view. Elizabeth Lo’s gorgeous, absorbing snapshot of several stray dogs on the streets of Istanbul spends most of its concise 72 minutes hovering at the height of its subjects, as the camera hangs alongside them, adopting a mystical and even envious tone to their rough-and-tumble routines. , but “Stray” has almost as much to say about the people who come across the homeless creatures at its center.

The most obvious precedent for Lo’s approach is “Kedi,” Ceyda Torun’s 2016 breakout hit about cats roaming the same city streets. However, while Torun fixated on the carefree individualism of the feline spirit, “Stray” doubles down on the wandering nature of man’s best
See full article at Indiewire »

Jay Duplass Has Seen the Future, and Honestly It’s Not So Bad

Jay Duplass Has Seen the Future, and Honestly It’s Not So Bad
Creators who wonder what their new working worlds have in store might take comfort in Jay Duplass. However unintentional, he and his brother Mark have spent their 18-year careers preparing for this moment.

“We could be among the first people back on track and shooting,” he said. “For us to make a small movie, we could take 17 people to a special rural location. We didn’t invent this model, but we’ve gotten good at it, knowing where to spend our time, energy, and resources. Actors can do their own hair and makeup and socially distance, not stacked on top of each other. That isn’t a big incubation risk.”

More from IndieWire'Stray' Review: Dog Lovers Will Drool Over This Profound Canine Love Letter from Turkey'Asia' Review: 'Unorthodox' Star Shira Haas Is Devastating in Emotional Mother-Daughter Drama

From “Transparent” and “The Morning Show” to “Room 104” and “Togetherness,” the Duplass Bros.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Asia’ Review: ‘Unorthodox’ Star Shira Haas Is Devastating in Emotional Mother-Daughter Drama

‘Asia’ Review: ‘Unorthodox’ Star Shira Haas Is Devastating in Emotional Mother-Daughter Drama
The teen death drama has been done and redone so many times that it’s practically an algorithm. The most rewarding aspect of “Asia” is the way it acknowledges those boundaries without playing into clichés. A modest, intimate mother-daughter drama with one of the most wrenching finales in recent memory, writer-director Ruthy Pribar’s first feature scrutinizes the psychological processes of a young woman coming to terms with her short life, and what happens when others project their own expectations onto that scenario. Before you can say “The Fault in Our Stars,” Pribar’s subtle movie , mining familiar territory and rejuvenating it with emotional impact that worms its way into the material from unexpected places.

Much of its power comes from a hypnotizing performance by Shira Haas, most recently seen as the young Hasidic community escapee on Netflix’s riveting “Unorthodox,” here playing another forlorn woman incapable of meshing with ordinary life.
See full article at Indiewire »

Asia Movie Review

  • ShockYa
Asia Movie Review
Asia Tribeca International Film Festival 2020 Reviewed for Shockya.com & BigAppleReviews.net linked from Rotten Tomatoes by: Harvey Karten Director: Ruthy Pribar Screenwriter: Ruthy Pribar Cast: Alena Yiv, Shira Haas, Tamir Mulla, Gera Sandler Screened at: Critics’ link, NYC, 4/17/20 Opens: Tbd Israel has been academy-award nominated more times than any other country in the Middle […]

The post Asia Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

‘Robert the Bruce’ Review: Angus Macfadyen Reprises His ‘Braveheart’ Role for a Flat and Unfocused Sequel

‘Robert the Bruce’ Review: Angus Macfadyen Reprises His ‘Braveheart’ Role for a Flat and Unfocused Sequel
The best thing about “Robert the Bruce” — that finds Angus Macfadyen reprising his role from that Oscar-winning epic — is that it doesn’t find a role for Mel Gibson. Alas, the worst thing about this generic follow-up is that it almost makes you wish that it had.

Despite forsaking the massive scale and maniacal egotism of Gibson’s blockbuster in favor of something a bit more life-sized and contained (read: cheaper), Richard Gray’s medieval family melodrama could use some of the dick-swinging bellicosity that “Braveheart” kept under its kilt. It could use some of that movie’s fire and bloodlust, and maybe even a smidgen of the smirking charm that allowed Gibson to leverage the First War of Scottish Independence into a vanity project for the ages. It could use any kind of animating force whatsoever.

More from IndieWire'Asia' Review: 'Unorthodox' Star Shira Haas Is Devastating in Emotional Mother-Daughter
See full article at Indiewire »

Jessica Chastain Interviews ‘Unorthodox’ Breakout Shira Haas About Her Netflix Series

  • Variety
Jessica Chastain Interviews ‘Unorthodox’ Breakout Shira Haas About Her Netflix Series
Onscreen, “Unorthodox” star Shira Haas breaks free of her restrictive upbringing to start a new life as an artist. Offscreen, she’s simply a breakout — as one the year’s most exciting rising stars.

The 24-year-old actress, who lives in Tel Aviv, portrays Esther “Esty” Shapiro on the Netflix limited series. She’s playing a story based on real life: As directed by Maria Schrader, with a largely female creative team and crew, “Unorthodox” is adapted from Deborah Feldman’s 2012 best-selling memoir “Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots.”

But within a version of Feldman’s story, Haas finds something entirely new. Her work brings to mind the naivety of Carey Mulligan in “An Education” and the harder edges of Jennifer Garner from “Alias.”

On a recent afternoon, Haas spoke on a Zoom call with Jessica Chastain, her co-star in the 2017 war drama “The Zookeeper’s Wife,” about the role,
See full article at Variety »

‘Unorthodox’ Star Amit Rahav Signs With Lighthouse Management & Media

  • Deadline
‘Unorthodox’ Star Amit Rahav Signs With Lighthouse Management & Media
Exclusive: Amit Rahav, star of Netflix’s critically praised miniseries Unorthodox, has signed with Lighthouse Management & Media for representation.

Rahav portrays Yanky Shapiro in the four-part series, inspired by Deborah Feldman’s bestselling memoir Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection Of My Hasidic Roots, the story of a young Jewish woman’s escape from a religious sect. It follows Esty, played by Shira Haas, who leaves an arranged marriage in New York and sets out on her own to Berlin. Rahav’s Yanky Shapiro is Esty’s troubled husband.

More from DeadlineNetflix Sets Cast & Director For Original Series 'Unorthodox' From 'Deutschland 83/86' Creator, Shoot Underway In BerlinDisney Channel's Skai Jackson Inks With Lighthouse; Donna Murphy To IndustryAleen Keshishian Leaves Brillstein Entertainment Partners To Form Lighthouse Management

Rahav’s other previous credits include the role of Aaron on USA Network’s drama series Dig.

The in-demand actor, who is also
See full article at Deadline »
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