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Bong Joon Ho’s ‘Parasite’ Posts Powerful Opening in North America

  • Variety
Bong Joon Ho’s ‘Parasite’ Posts Powerful Opening in North America
Bong Joon-Ho’s dark comedy “Parasite,” which won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival, has launched with a spectacular $376,264 at three U.S. theaters.

Neon opened “Parasite” at The Landmark and Arclight Hollywood in Los Angeles and at the IFC Center in New York, where it broke the opening record set by 2014’s “Boyhood.” Its per-screen average of $125,421 is the highest since the opening of “La La Land” in 2016, and it’s also the largest per screen average for any foreign language film.

Parasite” is a return to Korean-language film for Joon-Ho following “Okja” and “Snowpiercer.” It is also his fourth collaboration with Song Kang-Ho, who stars in the film. The film also stars Lee Sun-kyun, Cho Yeo-jeong, Choi Woo-shik and Park So-dam. Jessica Kiang called the film “brilliant” in her review for Variety out of Cannes.

The story centers on the interactions between two families — one
See full article at Variety »

Parasite (Gisaengchung) Review: Elegantly plotted movie, carefully preparing us for drama

  • ShockYa
Parasite (Gisaengchung) Neon Reviewed for Shockya.com & BigAppleReviews.net linked from Rotten Tomatoes by: Harvey Karten Director: Bong Joon-ho Screenwriter: Bong Joon-ho, Han Jin-won Cast: Song Kang-ho, Choi Woo-shik, Chang Hyae-jin, Park So-dam, Lee Sun-kyun, Cho Yeo-jeong, Jung Ziso, Lee Jung-em, Jung Hyeon-jun Screened at: Dolby, NYC, 10/8/19 Opens: October 11, 2019 Some say that the […]

The post Parasite (Gisaengchung) Review: Elegantly plotted movie, carefully preparing us for drama appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

New Trailer For Director Bong Joon-ho's Hitchcockian "Pitch-Black Modern Fairytale" Parasite

We’ve got a thrilling new trailer to share with you for director Bong Joon-ho‘s new film Parasite. The film is described as a “pitch-black modern fairytale,” and it’s become one of the best-reviewed movies of the year.

Joon-ho is the director of films such as Memories of Murder, The Host, Mother, Snowpiercer, and Okja, and judging from the reviews, this is one of his greatest achievements. As you’ll see in the trailer, lots of critics hail the film as a masterpiece.

Here’s the synopsis:

Meet the Park Family: the picture of aspirational wealth. And the Kim Family, rich in street smarts but not much else. Be it chance or fate, these two houses are brought together and the Kims sense a golden opportunity. Masterminded by college-aged Ki-woo, the Kim children expediently install themselves as tutor and art therapist, to the Parks. Soon, a symbiotic relationship forms between the two families.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Parasite Review: Bong Joon-ho's Masterpiece About Class

Bong Joon-ho's Parasite is a masterwork that builds on the allegorical bite of Snowpiercer and Okja to become the best film of 2019.

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If you ever want to see the severe extremes of a class system, just look around any major city. Bong Joon-ho is aware of this, which is why he takes perverse pleasure in how he’s staged Parasite, a masterful passion play about the immense gap between those with money—lots and lots of money—and those without. While one family, the Kims, are introduced literally occupying space below sea level in a scuzzy apartment they insist is a “semi-basement,” another lives on a hill. Scratch that, the Park family lives above the hill, complete with a landscaped and walled off garden that acts like a mini-Eden above the unseen, urban riffraff.

Such are the incongruous realities of living in the same Seoul. Within this juxtaposition Joon-ho presents Parasite,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Final Us Trailer for Bong Joon-ho's 'Parasite' - In Theaters This Month

"You know what kind of plan never fails? No plan at all." Neon has released one final official Us trailer for Bong Joon-ho's masterpiece Parasite, which won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival this summer. The film is opening in Us theaters starting on October 11th later this month, after playing at Tiff and Nyff as well. An unemployed, impoverished Korean family works their way into the home of the wealthy and glamorous Parks, until they get entangled in an unexpected incident. The film stars Song Kang-ho with Lee Sun-kyun, Cho Yeo-jeong, Jang Hye-jin, Choi Woo-shik, Park So-dam, plus Park Seo-joon. I Love this film, it's unquestionably one of the best of the decade - not even hyperbole. I wrote a glowing review of this from Cannes, calling it, "an intelligent, amusing, devious, uniquely-Korean script that is a total knockout." Do not miss this in theaters. Here's the
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Video Review – Parasite (2019)

Parasite, 2019.

Directed by Bong Joon-Ho.

Starring Song Kang-ho, Lee Sun-kyun, Cho Yeo-jeong, Choi Woo-shik, and Park So-dam.

After two impressive festival screening, check out our video review for Parasite. In the video below, Flickering Myth critic Ej Moreno talks about director Bong Joon-Ho’s latest masterpiece and why this is one of the year’s best; watch the video here, and head on over to our YouTube channel for more reviews and exclusive videos…

Meet the Park Family: the picture of aspirational wealth. And the Kim Family, rich in street smarts but not much else. Be it chance or fate, these two houses are brought together and the Kims sense a golden opportunity. Masterminded by college-aged Ki-woo, the Kim children expediently install themselves as tutor and art therapist, to the Parks. Soon, a symbiotic relationship forms between the two families. The Kims provide “indispensable” luxury services while the Parks obliviously bankroll their entire household.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film review: Parasite (2019) by Bong Joon-ho

Judging by the taste of A-list film festivals juries, Asian cinema is taking the lead on the world scale. Last year at Cannes, two of the most lauded films were Palme d’Or winner “Shoplifters” by Hirokazu Koreeda and “Burning” by Lee Chang-dong. Interestingly, both were examining class conflict in a divided society with deep rifts between the haves and have-nots. There are obvious parallels to be drawn between this year’s Palme laureate, Bong Joon-ho’s “Parasite” and both of the aforementioned films so we could debate on a trend of sorts, where the approach of art-house drama or more genre-oriented is just a matter of taste. We were lucky enough to finally catch the “Parasite” at Sarajevo’s impressive and impressively full open-air stage.

Like in “Shoplifters,” here we also have a family (only this time biological) of four living on the fringes of society in a basement
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Thrilling Trailer for Bong Joon-ho's Parasite - "A Pitch Black Modern Fairytale"

Bong Joon-ho, the director of films such as Memories of Murder, The Host, Mother, Snowpiercer, and Okja, has made a new movie called Parasite, and it looks like a freakin’ great movie! The first trailer has been released, and I want to watch this movie now!

The film is described as being a “pitch-black modern fairytale,” and some of the reviews for it are saying it’s one of the best movies of the year. Here’s the synopsis:

Meet the Park Family: the picture of aspirational wealth. And the Kim Family, rich in street smarts but not much else. Be it chance or fate, these two houses are brought together and the Kims sense a golden opportunity. Masterminded by college-aged Ki-woo, the Kim children expediently install themselves as tutor and art therapist, to the Parks. Soon, a symbiotic relationship forms between the two families. The Kims provide “indispensable” luxury
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Official Us Trailer for Bong Joon-ho's Palme d'Or-Winning 'Parasite'

"Rich people are really gullible." Neon has debuted the first full Us trailer for Bong Joon-ho's masterpiece Parasite, which won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival earlier this summer. This is hands-down one of the best films of the year, and it's getting a theatrical release starting in October after playing at Tiff and Nyff. An unemployed, impoverished Korean family works their way into the home of the wealthy and glamorous Parks, until they get entangled in an unexpected incident. The film stars Song Kang-ho with Lee Sun-kyun, Cho Yeo-jeong, Jang Hye-jin, Choi Woo-shik, Park So-dam, plus Park Seo-joon. I Love this film, so so so much. I wrote a glowing review of this from Cannes, calling it, "an intelligent, amusing, devious, uniquely-Korean script that is a total knockout." I've seen it twice already and it's still one of my favorite films of the year. Don't miss it.
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

U.S. Trailer for Bong Joon-ho’s Palme d’Or Winner ‘Parasite’ Introduces a Class Divide

Let the #BongHive expand. After his globe-trotting, multi-lingual adventure Okja, Bong Joon-ho returned solely to South Korea for his follow-up, the smaller-scale Parasite, which packed a great deal of mysterious ahead of its Cannes premiere. It turned out to exceed even our highest of expectations, earning the Palme d’Or and near-unanimous praise. Neon smartly picked up prior to its premiere and now have released the first trailer ahead of an October release.

Starring Song Kang-Ho, Lee Sun-Kyun, Cho Yeo-Jeong, Choi Woo-Shik, and Park So-Dam, the story follows two families from different classes in an examination of the social stratification in the director’s native South Korea. Giovanni Marchini Camia said in our Cannes review, “With the terrific Parasite, Bong has crafted an angry, genre-inflected social allegory that in many ways functions as a Korean analog to Jordan Peele’s Us. A far superior craftsman than Peele, Bong is perhaps the contemporary master of entertaining,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Bong Joon-Ho’s Palme d’Or Winner ‘Parasite’ Pulled From Chinese Film Festival

Originally slated to close China’s First Film Festival on July 28, South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s “Parasite” has just been removed from the fest’s slate for “technical reasons.” The film, which won the Palme d’Or unanimously at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival, is the fifth festival film to rankle Chinese censors this year, according to Variety.

Organizers of the 10-day festival in Xining, Qinghai province, released a social media statement, issuing “sincere apologies for the inconvenience,” but with no further details. The festival’s shuttering of Bong’s dark, class-conflict comedy likely stems from the currently tense diplomatic relationship between China and South Korea, which operates an American-owned anti-missile system, in conflict with China’s own military policies. All Korean films and TV series are also banned from being imported in China for theatrical exhibition and streaming, with no Korean films seeing a release in China in the last two years.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Jo Pil-ho: The Dawning Rage’ Review (Netflix)

  • Nerdly
Stars: Philip Hersh, So-nee Jeon, Sun-kyun Lee, Young-yu Lee, Hae-Joon Park | Written and Directed by Jeong-beom Lee

Jo Pil-ho: The Dawning Rage, directed by Lee Jeong-beom, stars Lee Sun-kyun as the titular character. A washed-up double-crossing crooked detective who on his latest illegal exploit is uncovered in a larger underground criminal conspiracy scheme that splits his personal life and career in half.

Think a Korean spin on Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver meets Abel Ferrera’s Bad Lieutenant. The story itself, written by Lee Jeong-beom and Im Beom, isn’t all that dissimilar from your usual anti-hero detective thriller born out of conventional genre tropes and flood the South Korean market. However, Jo Pil-ho: The Dawning Rage offers a decent escapade for its audience, with a balance of tone that works perfectly in a less than the harsh approach to the material that could easily be overly muddled and dark.
See full article at Nerdly »

Cannes Palme d’Or Winner ‘Parasite’ Has $3.9 Million Opening Day in Korea

  • Variety
“Parasite,” the Palme d’Or-winning film from South Korean director Bong Joon-ho, has enjoyed a winning start at its home box office. It earned $3.93 million on Thursday, according to data from Kobiz, the tracking service of the Korean Film Council.

That put it far ahead of holdover title “Aladdin,” which came in second place, and the fourth-place start for “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” which opened a day earlier, on Wednesday, and earned only $212,000 on Thursday for a two-day cumulative of $768,000.

Since “Parasite’s” victory in Cannes last Saturday and Bong’s return home Monday, the film has enjoyed nonstop enthusiastic coverage in the South Korean media. It was screened for Korean media on Tuesday.

Plaudits were also heaped on actor Song Kang-ho, who has appeared in four of Bong’s films and who plays the father of a poor but resourceful family that works its way into the good graces of a richer family.
See full article at Variety »

Cannes Winner ‘Parasite’ Gets Awards Season Release

  • Variety
Cannes Winner ‘Parasite’ Gets Awards Season Release
Bong Joon-Ho’s dark comedy “Parasite,” which won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival, has been scheduled by Neon for an awards season release of Oct. 11 in Los Angeles and New York.

Neon made the announcement Thursday, asserting that it has positioned the title as a prime awards season contender in the international film category and beyond. “Parasite” will receive a traditional arthouse platform release with a gradual expansion.

Parasite” is a return to Korean-language film for Joon-Ho following “Okja” and “Snowpiercer.” It is also his fourth collaboration with Song Kang-Ho, who stars in the film, as well as his fifth collaboration with Neon CEO Tom Quinn.

The film also stars Lee Sun-kyun, Cho Yeo-jeong, Choi Woo-shik and Park So-dam. Jessica Kiang called the film “brilliant” in her review for Variety out of Cannes.

The story centers on the interactions between two families — one being the picture
See full article at Variety »

Neon Sets Bong Joon-ho’s Palme d’Or Winner ‘Parasite’ for Oscar-Ready October Release

Neon Sets Bong Joon-ho’s Palme d’Or Winner ‘Parasite’ for Oscar-Ready October Release
Fresh off the heels of a major victory at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival, Bong Joon-ho’s acclaimed dramatic thriller “Parasite” will open in select theaters October 11. Indie and foreign film distributor Neon picked up U.S. rights to the movie before Cannes but have now slated the film to debut in theaters in the height of Oscar season. The company says it will be releasing “Parasite” as a “prime awards season contender.” The movie will have a traditional arthouse platform release.

Neon’s official synopsis for the movie reads: “Meet the Park Family: the picture of aspirational wealth. And the Kim Family, rich in street smarts but not much else. Be it chance or fate, these two houses are brought together and the Kims sense a golden opportunity. Masterminded by college-aged Ki-woo, the Kim children expediently install themselves as tutor and art therapist to the Parks. Soon, a symbiotic relationship forms between the two families.
See full article at Indiewire »

Bong Joon-ho Makes Cannes History As First Korean Director to Win Palme d’Or

Bong Joon-ho Makes Cannes History As First Korean Director to Win Palme d’Or
Bong Joon-ho has made groundbreaking history at the Cannes Film Festival by becoming the first Korean director in the festival’s 72-year history to win the Palme d’Or. The writer-director won the Palme for his dramatic thriller “Parasite,” which earned rave reviews in competition and was named by IndieWire as one of the 10 best films of the festival.

Bong Joon-ho competed for his first Palme d’Or at Cannes 2017 with his Netflix-backed “Okja,” starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Tilda Swinton. The film lost the Palme d’Or prize that year to Ruben Östlund’s “The Square.” Bong has a long history with the Cannes Film Festival, having premiered his breakout monster movie “The Host” at Directors’ Fortnight and his acclaimed “Mother” in the Un Certain Regard sidebar.

“Parasite” centers around a struggling family that invades the lives of the wealthy Park family and gets in over their heads when
See full article at Indiewire »

Bong Joon Ho's 'Parasite' takes the lead on Screen's Cannes jury grid

Bong Joon Ho's 'Parasite' takes the lead on Screen's Cannes jury grid
‘Oh Mercy!’ scores mid-range; ‘Matthias And Maxime’ flounders.

Bong Joon Ho’s Parasite has taken the number one spot on Screen’s Cannes jury grid, with an average of 3.4 from our ten critics.

The black comedy received four scores of four (excellent) – a joint-high on this year’s grid, with Céline Sciamma’s Portrait Of A Lady On Fire and Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood. The La TimesJustin Chang, The Paper’s Wang Muyan, Positif’s Michel Ciment, Meduza’s Anton Dolin and Screen’s own critic all awarded it top marks, with its lowest
See full article at ScreenDaily »

2019 Cannes Critics’ Panel: Day 9 – Bong Joon-ho’s Parasite

He made his first trip to Cannes in 2006 with the Directors’ Fortnight selected The Host, and after being selected for the Un Certain Regard for Tokyo! (2008) and Mother (2009), Bong Joon-ho finally got some love after 2013’s Snowpiercer with a comp spot for 2017’s Okja and now, Parasite. South Korean genre-bender stars Song Kang-ho, Lee Sun-kyun, Cho Yeo-jeong, Choi Woo-shik and Park So-dam. The film revolves around Ki-taek and his unemployed family as they take a peculiar interest in the wealthy Park family, which leads them to get entangled in an unexpected incident.

With several perfect and near perfect scores, Parasite blows the rest of the comp titles away with grades hovering around the 4 mark.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Parasite’

  • Variety
Cannes Film Review: ‘Parasite’
A laugh turns into a snarl which gets stuck in the throat like a sob — or an arrow through the neck — in Bong Joon-ho’s latest wild, wild ride, “Parasite.” On paper, that might not sound so very different from the experience of watching Bong’s “Snowpiercer,” “Memories of Murder” “The Host” or “Okja.” The Korean trickster god is above all known for his uncategorizable movie melées which tumble bloodily down the genre stairs hitting every step — comedy, horror, drama, social commentary, slasher, creature feature, murder mystery, manifesto for vegetarianism — on the way. But while “Parasite” certainly cycles through more than half that list, the laugh is darker, the snarl more vicious and the sob more despairing than we’ve ever had from him before. Bong is back and on brilliant form, but he is unmistakably, roaringly furious, and it registers because the target is so deserving, so enormous, so
See full article at Variety »

Parasite review – creepy invasion of the lifestyle snatchers

Bong Joon-ho’s bizarre black comedy about a rich Korean family and a poor one in a modern-day Downton Abbey situation gets its tendrils in you

Bong Joon-ho has returned to Cannes with a luxuriously watchable and satirical suspense drama. It runs as purringly smooth as the Mercedes driven by the lead character, played by Korean star Song Kang-ho. Parasite is a bizarre black comedy about social status, aspiration, materialism and the patriarchal family unit, and people who accept the idea of having (or leasing) a servant class.

Parasite is about a wealthy Korean family in a modern-day Downton Abbey upstairs-downstairs situation, one far more unstable than the patrician caste realises. The film could perhaps be a bit more lean and mean, and deliver its jeopardy and payoff with more despatch. But it is an enjoyable, elegant, scabrous movie about a mix of servitude and trickery that is an interesting theme in Korean cinema.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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