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Film Review: Loveless (2017) by Andrey Zvyagintsev

Russian filmmaker Andrey Zvyagintsev’s fifth movie, after the colossal 2014’s “Leviathan”, is a harsh and cogent critique to his motherland, starting from an observation of its more traditional institution – the family – and broadening to the whole contemporary Russian society.

Boris (Alexey Rozin) and Zhenya (Maryana Spivak) are a Russian couple, a typical example of a middle-class that is becoming increasingly affluent. The two have reached the bitter end of their relationship; they can’t stay in the same space for more than few minutes without starting pathetic squabbles that inevitably end up in full-blown, very angry brawls. In fact, they are only waiting to sell the apartment where they still live as “separated-at-home” together with their 12-year-old son Alyosha (Matvey Novikov). After getting rid of this last bit of shared life, they will be free to move on as they both have new relationships and are
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Loveless – Review

Maryana Spivak as mom Zhenya and Matvey Novikov as her son Alyosha, in Loveless. Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics ©

The title of director Andrey Zvyagintsev’s film Loveless sums up the world that twelve-year old Alyosha (or Alexey as his name is spelled in English subtitles) lives in, but it also describes his parents failed marriage, their own toxic childhoods and the social dysfunction of modern Russian society, in this powerful, moving Russian-language drama.

Eerie, hypnotic Loveless is suffused with chilly, haunting and beautiful images as it takes us through a devastated life in an unforgiving society, in which money trumps human feeling and unrealistic expectations abound. There is a harsh realism to this film but also a poetic depth to this unforgettable drama.

Loveless debuted at Cannes and was one of the nominees for the foreign-language Oscar. This is not the first time director Zvyagintsev, who also co-wrote the script,
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Movie Review – Loveless (2017)

Loveless, 2017.

Directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev.

Starring Maryana Spivak, Aleksey Rozin, Varvara Shmykova, Matvey Novikov, Daria Pisareva, and Yanina Hope.

Synopsis:

A couple going through a divorce must team up to find their son who has disappeared during one of their bitter arguments.

Loveless is detached and bleak, a window into the lives of a couple near the finish line of a nasty divorce where each partner already has a new flame. The issue is that their 12-year-old son Alexei is neglected and ignored to the point where the depressed lad winds up missing (either he ran away or something much more sinister has happened). Then again, both Zhenya and Boris are such selfish and one track minded individuals that it’s hard to imagine a time when the boy ever did feel truly loved. Yet, director Andrey Zvyagintsev (most known for his previous accolade garnering feature Leviathan) consistently finds ways
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – Loveless (2017)

Loveless, 2017.

Directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev.

Starring Maryana Spivak, Aleksey Rozin, and Matvey Novikov.

Synopsis:

A couple going through a divorce must team up to find their son who has disappeared during one of their bitter arguments.

Loveless issues two stark warnings to its audience: don’t let your resentment for another render you without love for anyone, and don’t trust movie trailers. While the film’s two-minute long preview promises a dark, haunting, thriller, what the film delivers is a politically charged quagmire of despair that isn’t half as clever as it thinks it is.

The film’s opening minutes are composed of long, static wide shots and silence, which give fill the audience with a palpable sense of unease. After the silence breaks, we are introduced to Alyosha (Matvey Novikov), son of Zhenya and Boris (Maryana Spivak and Aleksey Rozin) and perhaps the only likeable character in the movie.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'Loveless' Review: Bad Parenting as Putin-Era Metaphor in Devastating Russian Drama

'Loveless' Review: Bad Parenting as Putin-Era Metaphor in Devastating Russian Drama
When is a bad marriage something more than a bad marriage? The answer: When Andrey Zvyagintsev (The Return, Elena) writes and directs a movie about it and turns the result into a mesmerizing meditation on the state of Russia today. Loveless is not an overtly political film, but it resonates with unease about the failure of government to serve the neediest (a fault not limited to Russia) and citizens too selfish to see past their own selfies (also not limited to Russia).

The time is 2012, and Putin is determined to annex Crimea.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Loveless Movie Review

Loveless Movie Review
Loveless (Nelyubov) Sony Pictures Classics Director: Andrey Zvyagintsev Screenwriter: Oleg Negin, Andrey Zvyagintsev Cast: Maryana Spivak, Alexey Rozin, Matvey Novikov, Marina Vasilyeva, Andrid Keishs, Alexey Fateev Screened at: Critics’ DVD, NYC, 11/27/17 Opens: February 26, 2017 but early December 2017 for one week for awards consideration. You’re of course familiar with the chorus of Van […]

The post Loveless Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Cannes Winning Best Actor and Lanthimos' Quirky 'Family' Thriller Academy Award Chances?

'120 Beats per Minute' trailer: Robin Campillo's AIDS movie features plenty of drama and a clear sociopolitical message. AIDS drama makes Pedro Almodóvar cry – but will Academy members tear up? (See previous post re: Cannes-Oscar connection.) In case France submits it to the 2018 Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, screenwriter-director Robin Campillo's AIDS drama 120 Beats per Minute / 120 battements par minute, about the Paris Act Up chapter in the early 1990s, could quite possibly land a nomination. The Grand Prix (Cannes' second prize), international film critics' Fipresci prize, and Queer Palm winner offers a couple of key ingredients that, despite its gay sex scenes, should please a not insignificant segment of the Academy membership: emotionalism and a clear sociopolitical message. When discussing the film after the presentation of the Palme d'Or, Pedro Almodóvar (and, reportedly, jury member Jessica Chastain) broke into tears. Some believed, in fact, that 120 Beats per Minute
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

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