‘Acasa, My Home’ Review: An Immersive and Often Brutal Window Into Life on the Romanian Margins

‘Acasa, My Home’ Review: An Immersive and Often Brutal Window Into Life on the Romanian Margins
The real stars of “Acasa, My Home,” an immersive look at life in Romania at the border between wilderness and bustling Bucharest, are cinematographers Radu Ciorniciuc and Mircea Topoleanu. Ciorniciuc is also the film’s director, and together they appear to have created such an easy rapport with the land-dwelling family of their focus that they’re able to exist as invisible spectators. And the subjects of the film — a family displaced out of unclaimed land and into city life — display no resistance to being watched. Gica Enache, his wife, Niculina, and their nine children bob and weave around the camera as if it weren’t there, which makes for .

The familiarity between the Enache family, who lived for two decades in the Bucharest Delta, and the filmmakers who found them is easy to believe: they spent three years together, charting course from a rural life to a more rigid one in the metropolis.
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