How ‘The Story of a Three-Day Pass’ Became the First Film to Show Black Power on Screen

How ‘The Story of a Three-Day Pass’ Became the First Film to Show Black Power on Screen
Living as an ex-pat in Paris in the late 1950s, Melvin Van Peebles taught himself the language and wrote five books in French. The fifth, 1967’s “La Permission,” became the basis for his 1968 feature-film debut, “The Story of a Three-Day Pass.” A commentary on France’s contradictory attitudes about race, it’s an exploration of an interracial relationship between a Black American GI stationed in France and a white Parisian woman. A 4K restoration by IndieCollect, in consultation with his son Mario Van Peebles, opened in US theaters May 14.

The re-release isn’t tied to a milestone anniversary. “There’s a renewed interest in looking at Black history, given all that’s happened in the last few years, and you see it on the screen,” Mario said. “It’s also an anniversary of all things Van Peebles in a way: ‘Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song’ celebrates its 50-year anniversary this year.
See full article at Indiewire »

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