‘No Sudden Move’ Film Review: Steven Soderbergh Very Stylishly Overplays His Hand

‘No Sudden Move’ Film Review: Steven Soderbergh Very Stylishly Overplays His Hand
Forget it, Jake — it’s late-stage capitalism. Director Steven Soderbergh has been following the money throughout his career, going at least as far back as the “Ocean’s” movies, where financial institutions take a hit at the hands of the strivers and scrabblers. Since returning from his “retirement” from movies, he’s offered stories as disparate as “High Flying Bird,” which suggests the possibility of labor wresting control from management, and “The Laundromat,” a messy exposé of shell companies and offshore tax shelters that at least tries to gin up audience outrage over a seemingly unsolvable dilemma.

Now he’s back with “No Sudden Move,” which allows the director to revel in his love for dark comedy, criminal capers, period detail, and all-star ensembles, and while all of those elements make the film entertaining, the story ultimately feels like a hopeless recitation of doom: The rich and powerful will always be rich and powerful.
See full article at The Wrap »

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