TIFF Review: The Tsugua Diaries Insightfully Explores the Perception of Time During the Pandemic

TIFF Review: The Tsugua Diaries Insightfully Explores the Perception of Time During the Pandemic
When the idea of “pandemic movies” becoming a sort of subgenre was formed and necessitated by global conditions, there was a groan that could be heard around the world. We know how this goes. Artists will jump on gimmicky opportunities to shallowly explore interior space and entrapment. It became a cliché before any movie was even made. Yet some great artists found a way to make unique, memorable studies of the current moment. Mati Diop’s In My Room used interior space and feelings of inability to escape to explore monotonous life. Rob Savage’s clever Host turned entrapment into a nightmare of computer-aided terror. The latest film from Portugal’s Maureen Fazandeiro and Miguel Gomes is an exercise in how art itself––and, by virtue, the people involved in making it––has been changed by the pandemic.

The Tsugua Diaries are essentially a recounting of both the narrative arc
See full article at The Film Stage »

Similar News


Recently Viewed