‘God’s Country’ Review: Thandiwe Newton Delivers Politically Charged Suspense on a Human Scale

‘God’s Country’ Review: Thandiwe Newton Delivers Politically Charged Suspense on a Human Scale
The premise of “God’s Country” paints the proverbial “two Americas” with the broadest possible brushstrokes, pitting a Black, female humanities professor against two white guys in a red pickup truck. Nobody mentions who they voted for, but the preconceived notions write themselves. Yet the film digs deeper with each passing scene, subverting our first impressions of each character before letting them prove they are exactly who we thought they were. Julian Higgins’ excellent film constantly dangles redemption in front of our faces, begging us to imagine a better world, but ultimately delivers a stark reminder of how bitterly divided the country is.

We first meet Sandra, played by Thandiwe Newton, as she watches her mother’s cremation. “God’s Country” follows Sandra for the first week of her life without her mother, conveniently labeling each of the seven days. She teaches public speaking at a rural college we never learn the name of,
See full article at Indiewire »

Similar News


Recently Viewed