Review of Unveiled

Unveiled (1994)
3/10
As An Alleged Thriller, It Fails To Thrill.
10 December 2012
Style tussles with substance in this artistically absurd work that is punctuated by wedges of uninspired dialogue and, while ofttimes in the realm of cinema style prevails, that is not the case with this piece, limply directed by first (and last) - timer William Cole, as the affair is glutted with plot holes stemming from failures in logic and continuity. Stephanie Montgomery (Lisa Zane)'s predilection for cocaine use is propelling the Southern California woman towards the serving of what will be lengthy prison time, whereupon her wealthy and influential father (performed by Zane's actual parent) intercedes for her, therewith giving her a choice. He will suspend her income if she does not either enter a drug rehabilitation facility, or elect to take a lengthy vacation far from her customary haunts and companions. Stephanie, not in favour of a rehabilitative process, decides upon going to Marrakech, in Morocco, to visit with a friend. Immediately following her arrival, the friend is apparently a victim of a serial murderer who is preying upon young women. The film then expends most of its energies in focussing upon Stephanie's predictable falling into a condition of hapless lust with the ostensible killer, Jeremy Avery, played by Nick Chinlund. In addition to this entanglement, she becomes a type of amateur investigator utilised by a Moroccan-based United States Government official, Peter Masters (Whip Hubley) who through her assistance, intends to end Jeremy's maniacal actions. A viewer may find difficulty in determining any hidden motivations, if any, behind the actions of Masters and Avery, since the script provides only unconvincing reasons for Stephanie's demeanour toward them. When the various plot conflicts come to a head, it becomes clear that overt melodrama is the principal purpose here, rather than the construction of a mystery to be untangled. After the film's somewhat incoherent beginning, the picturesque city of Marrakech and its environs assume a significant part in the tale, unquestionably to the satisfaction of those viewers whose interest may stem less from the weakly crafted narrative and the actions committed by the primary characters, and more from some arresting architecture of the ancient city. Zane's no-nonsense style of performing is appropriate for her role as Stephanie, while the charismatic Stinlund garners the acting laurels with his turn as the mysterious Jeremy Avery.
1 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink

Recently Viewed