The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) - News Poster

News

‘Madame X’ Review: A Madonna Concert Film That’s Heavy on Message, Light on Euphoria

‘Madame X’ Review: A Madonna Concert Film That’s Heavy on Message, Light on Euphoria
Madame X,” the new Madonna concert film, opens with a montage of some of the pop superstar’s most legendary performances, music videos, and shock-theater provocations: the infamous moments from the MTV Video Music Awards, the transgressive S&m imagery and Gaultier fashion, the tabloid headlines like “What a Tramp” and “Madonna Has No Shame” (how quaint in the age of Instagram!), the on-cue outrage from the Catholic Church. The film closes with a montage of oppressed people and groups from around the world set to Madonna’s onstage performance of “I Rise,” a song about the powerless standing up to fight the power. The opening montage reminds you of the impassioned and sometimes scandalous effusiveness of Madonna in her heyday; each clip gives off a buzz. The final montage is earnest to a fault, and the song, while working overtime to be an anthem, is serviceable and far from ecstatic.
See full article at Variety »

‘Homefront’ Review: An Expressionist Murder Mystery Set in the Wake of World War I

‘Homefront’ Review: An Expressionist Murder Mystery Set in the Wake of World War I
It was a bold move for Stefan Ruzowitzky (“The Counterfeiters” among many others) to conceive of a gritty Expressionist detective-thriller set in the aftermath of World War I, shot almost entirely on blue screen. Whether it’s also fully successful is open for debate. Thematically, the idea was to tackle the impotent rage of the Austro-Hungarian patriarchy whose fanatical belief in Emperor and Empire went up in smoke when the Armistice brushed aside the monarchy and reduced the territory to a state of near insignificance. With this context, the film foregrounds the story of a traumatized lieutenant returning to his duties as police inspector in Vienna just when an especially sadistic murderer is killing his former comrades.

Given all these elements, it’s not such a leap to envision a reawakening of Expressionism, at its cinematic height in 1919-1920, as an appropriate visual style. Ruzowitzky however isn’t content with its hermetic,
See full article at Variety »

Oscar Winner Stefan Ruzowitzky on Creating an Expressionist Landscape for Crime Thriller ‘Hinterland,’ Premiering at Locarno

Oscar Winner Stefan Ruzowitzky on Creating an Expressionist Landscape for Crime Thriller ‘Hinterland,’ Premiering at Locarno
Stefan Ruzowitzky, who won an Oscar for “The Counterfeiters,” is at the Locarno Film Festival on Friday for the world premiere in the iconic Piazza Grande venue of his crime thriller “Hinterland.” He speaks to Variety about the film, which Beta Cinema is selling worldwide.

Hinterland” centers on a former Austrian prisoner of war, Peter Perg, who returns home to Vienna in 1920. Everything has changed. The once mighty Austro-Hungarian Empire has crumbled, the imperial dynasty has been replaced by a republic, and myriad artistic, political and intellectual movements are questioning the old certainties. When a serial killer starts to pick off military veterans, Perg, a former detective, is brought in to investigate.

Hinterland” was shot almost exclusively on blue screen, with the background depicting a distorted vision of Vienna inspired by Expressionist classic “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,” reflecting Perg’s jaundiced view of Austrian society. Ruzowitzky comments: “In these
See full article at Variety »

Fantasia 2021 announces closing night film, final wave of titles

Fantasia 2021 announces closing night film, final wave of titles
Masterclasses and special awards for Stephen Sayadian, Phil Tippett, Shunji Iwai.

Takashi Miike’s The Great Yokai WarGuardians will close Fantasia International Film Festival (August 5-25), which festival heads have turned into a hybrid event after adding a limited roster of in-person screenings in Montreal.

Japanese horror specialist Miike’s sequel to his family fantasy epic and Fantasia 2006 opener The Great Yokai War gets its international premiere and centres on a battle between Japanese monsters that will determine the fate of the world.

Paul Andrew Williams’s (London To Brighton) UK crime thriller Bull is among world premieres in
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Emily Deschanel

Emily Deschanel
Bones star Emily Deschanel discusses a few of her favorite films with hosts Josh Olson and Joe Dante.

Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode

The Shining (1980) – Adam Rifkin’s trailer commentary

Dumb And Dumber (1994)

Dude, Where’s My Car? (2000)

This Is Spinal Tap (1984) – John Landis’s trailer commentary

Crusoe (1988)

Watership Down (1978)

Gandhi (1982)

Small Soldiers (1998)

Waiting For Guffman (1996)

Best In Show (2000) – Allan Arkush’s trailer commentary

Vertigo (1958) – Dan Ireland’s trailer commentary, Glenn Erickson’s Blu-ray review,

Marnie (1964) – Dan Irleand’s trailer commentary, Larry Cohen’s trailer commentary, Randy Fuller’s wine pairing recommendation

La Femme Nikita (1991)

Psycho (1960) – John Landis’s trailer commentary, Glenn Erickson’s Blu-ray review, Randy Fuller’s wine pairing recommendation

Psycho (1998) – Ti West’s trailer commentary

Citizen Kane (1941) – John Landis’s trailer commentary

Rear Window (1954) – Glenn Erickson’s Blu-ray review

Topaz (1969)

Foreign Correspondent (1940) – Larry Cohen’s trailer commentary

North By Northwest (1959)

Notorious (1946) – John Landis’s trailer commentary,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Jello Biafra

Jello Biafra
The legendary punk god joins us to talk about movies he finds unforgettable. Special appearance by his cat, Moon Unit.

Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode

Tapeheads (1988)

Rock ‘n’ Roll High School (1979) – Eli Roth’s trailer commentary

A Face In The Crowd (1957) – Josh Olson’s trailer commentary, Glenn Erickson’s Blu-ray review

Meet John Doe (1941)

Bob Roberts (1992)

Bachelor Party (1984)

Dangerously Close (1986)

Videodrome (1983) – Mick Garris’s trailer commentary

F/X (1986)

Hot Rods To Hell (1967)

Riot On Sunset Strip (1967)

While The City Sleeps (1956) – Glenn Erickson’s trailer commentary

Leaving Las Vegas (1995)

It’s A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963) – John Landis’s trailer commentary

Spider-Man (2002)

The Killing (1956) – Michael Lehmann’s trailer commentary

Serpent’s Egg (1977)

The Thin Man (1934)

Meet Nero Wolfe (1936)

The Hidden Eye (1945)

Eyes In The Night (1942)

Sudden Impact (1983) – Alan Spencer’s trailer commentary

Red Dawn (1984)

Warlock (1989)

The Dead Zone (1983) – Mick Garris’s trailer commentary

Secret Honor (1984)

The Player (1992) – Allan Arkush’s trailer commentary,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Rushes: Raoul Peck, New Cinema Scope, Sounds of the Taiwanese New Wave

Rushes: Raoul Peck, New Cinema Scope, Sounds of the Taiwanese New Wave
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSFilmmaker Bertrand Mandico has illustrated the 70th anniversary cover of Cahier du Cinéma, entitled "Gloria, angel of the history of the cinema." The Museum of Modern Art and Film at Lincoln Center have announced the lineup for the 50th edition of New Directors/New Films. Screenings will take place from April 28-May 8 through the MoMA and Flc virtual cinemas, and in-person screenings at Flc through May 13. The lineup of 27 features and 11 shorts includes Theo Anthony's All Light, Everywhere, Andreas Fontana's Azor, Alice Diop's We (Nous), and Jane Schoenbrun's We’re All Going to the World’s Fair. Recommended VIEWINGAnother Gaze's free streaming project, Another Screen, has announced two new programmes: Hands Tied, about hands, and Eating the Other, about gendered notions of eating. The first official trailer for Mamoru Hosoda's Belle, which
See full article at MUBI »

10 Iconic Scream Queens (& Their Highest Rated Movie On Rotten Tomatoes)

10 Iconic Scream Queens (& Their Highest Rated Movie On Rotten Tomatoes)
While the term “scream queen” was initially coined to refer to female actors who played damsels in distress, it’s since been redefined to refer to female stars of horror movies. Women have always had a prominent place in horror cinema, going back to the early classics like Nosferatu and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, but these roles initially involved being killed on-screen for cheap exploitation.

Related: The 5 Best Opening Scenes (& 5 Best Endings) Of Horror Movies

Over the years, as society has become slightly more enlightened, horror filmmakers have created more compelling and three-dimensional female characters like Laurie Strode and Jess Bradford. Now, being recognized as a scream queen is a badge of honor.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Forgotten By Fox: The End

Forgotten By Fox: The End
As Disney quietly disappears huge swathes of film history into its vaults, I've spent 2020 celebrating Twentieth Century Fox and the Fox Film Corporation's films, what one might call their output if only someone were putting it out. This is the final Forgotten By Fox entry."Have you ever seen any of your victims?" Robert Shaw is asked mid-way through End of the Game (1975), a line borrowed from The Third Man (1949). This I take to be author Friedrich Dürrenmatt's revenge, on behalf of his native Switzerland, for Orson Welles' celebrated crack about the cuckoo clock in Carol Reed's thriller, which appeared just before he wrote the book this film is based on.End of the Game is adapted from Dürrenmatt's 1950 novel The Judge and His Hangman by the author himself and Maximilian Schell, who also directs, inventively if a little inconsistently. Some scenes have the correct tragic force
See full article at MUBI »

The Forgotten: We're All Mad Here

The Forgotten: We're All Mad Here
As Disney quietly disappears huge swathes of film history into its vaults, I'm going to spend 2020 celebrating Twentieth Century Fox and the Fox Film Corporation's films, what one might call their output if only someone were putting it out.***As the great studios declined like mammoths sinking into tar pits, the films they produced started bifurcating: there were the stodgy, prestige pictures, like Cleopatra (1963) (which nearly sank Fox into the bitumen altogether), and there were trashy low-budget affairs farmed out to bottom-feeding indie producers, the sixties equivalent of the B pictures of yore. These were often more enjoyable than the respectable productions, even when they really were trash.Lauren Bacall counted Shock Treatment (1964) as the worst film of her career, and apart from her tendency to underrate Written on the Wind (1956), she had pretty sound judgement. Director Denis Sanders was among the first film school graduates to make films
See full article at MUBI »

‘BoJack Horseman’: Exploring Mortality in ‘The View from Halfway Down’

‘BoJack Horseman’: Exploring Mortality in ‘The View from Halfway Down’
It’s now or never for “BoJack Horseman” to win the Best Animated Series Emmy, and there’s no better representative than the penultimate episode, “The View from Halfway Down.” This summary statement, about titular horse BoJack (Will Arnett) encountering everyone who’s died in the series at a dinner party, forces him to confront the reasons behind his substance abuse and bad behavior. Rather than a dream, the surreal episode turns out to be a near-death experience, with BoJack apparently drowning in his swimming pool, making good on the prophetic image in the main titles.

For director Amy Winfrey, who oversaw 21 episodes throughout the six seasons, “The View from Halfway Down” was a particularly satisfying conclusion. Winfrey not only got to dabble in the ultimate expression of surrealism, but she also got to participate in fun callbacks with some of her favorite characters, including “Horsin’ Around” sitcom creator Herb
See full article at Indiewire »

10 '80s Horror Movies That Deserve A Proper Sequel

10 '80s Horror Movies That Deserve A Proper Sequel
Horror has always been a popular genre of film, dating all the way back to the silent era of cinema with films like The House of the Devil (1896) and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920). The genre has evolved over the decades, but the ‘80s holds a special place in a lot of fans’ hearts. This decade is known for over the top gore created with practical effects, original creative ideas, as well as for popularizing the slasher genre.

Related: The 5 Best (& 5 Worst) '80s Horror Movies

This era of horror is also known for pumping out sequels that rarely lived up to the original, with many films never getting a worthwhile sequel. Others on this list never got a sequel at all, leaving fans to wonder what could have been if the filmmakers would have at least tried to replicate their success.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Movie Poster of the Week: Film Posters from a German Salt Mine

Movie Poster of the Week: Film Posters from a German Salt Mine
Above: German poster for The Strike of the Thieves. Art by Walter Riemer.In 1944, as Allied air raids intensified towards the end of World War II, Germany’s centralized state film archive, the National Socialists’ Reichsfilmarchiv, decided to protect their vast collection of film and film publicity materials by hiding them in a salt mine in Grasleben, 125 miles west of Berlin. After the Allied victory, American units entered the mine and recovered the film reels. But much of the paper material was left behind.In 1986 a treasure trove of German film posters from the first four decades of film history were found, profoundly damaged by a fire, in the mine where they had remained for forty years. Starting in 2017, the posters were recovered, restored, and digitized.Many of those posters are currently on view at the exhibition Burn Marks – Film Posters from a Salt Mine, which opened in June at
See full article at MUBI »

6 Summer Thrillers to Binge in the Safety of Your Own Home

6 Summer Thrillers to Binge in the Safety of Your Own Home
It may feel as if Summer is pretty much canceled due to Covid-19, which gives thriller fans plenty of time to do what they do best: stay inside and read. Here, Rolling Stone has compiled six thrillers you could bring to the beach — or just binge in bed.

Riley Sager, Home Before Dark

A cross between Gillian Flynn’s Dark Places and ghost hunter heir Alexandra Holzer’s autobiography, Sager’s latest is a haunted house story — with a twist. When Maggie Holt’s father dies, leaving her Baneberry Hall,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Strong Slate of German Films Wait in the Wings of Pandemic

Strong Slate of German Films Wait in the Wings of Pandemic
German cinema looks set for an exciting year with forthcoming works that include a high-profile Cannes selection celebrating one of Germany’s most iconic filmmakers, an expressionistic thriller set in 1920s Vienna, a tale of Nazi seduction and a new Thomas Mann adaptation.

The Covid-19 pandemic dashed the excitement of a splashy Cannes premiere for Oskar Roehler’s “Enfant Terrible,” part of the festival’s Official Selection, but the film is nevertheless certain to generate buzz with its portrayal of legendary filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder, and his turbulent film career that spanned 1969 to 1982.

In making the film, Roehler found inspiration in Fassbinder’s own work.

“We didn’t want to do your standard biopic,” says producer Markus Zimmer, managing director of Bavaria Filmproduktion. “I think we did come very close to what Fassbinder would have made out of his own life. We tried to be in line with the artistic
See full article at Variety »

How Kraftwerk’s Synth Wizard Florian Schneider Rewired the World

How Kraftwerk’s Synth Wizard Florian Schneider Rewired the World
Farewell to the great Florian Schneider, co-founder of Kraftwerk, the German electronic duo who changed everything about the way music sounds. “Kraftwerk is not a band,” Schneider told Rolling Stone in 1975. “It’s a concept. We call it ‘Die Menschmaschine,’ which means ‘the human machine.’ We are not the band. I am me. Ralf is Ralf. And Kraftwerk is a vehicle for our ideas.” As his longtime collaborator Ralf Hütter once said, Schneider was the “sound fetishist” of the group — the machine in the mensch-machine.

Kraftwerk always reveled in their reputation as cerebral technocrats.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Golem: how he came into the world

The Golem: how he came into the world
A top movie monster is back from filmic perdition, restored to his full might and power. Rabbi Lowe’s answer to the persecution of the ghetto is a mysterious unthinking automaton capable of terrible destruction. Paul Wegener’s indelible clay statue stands as a core myth in Jewish lore. But he’s still here, usually in allegories about mankind losing control of its own creations. With its imposing architecture and impressive special effects, this early expressionist masterpiece is one of the design highlights of silent cinema.

The Golem

Blu-ray

Kino Classics

1920 / B&w with tints / 1:33 silent ap. / 76 min. / Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam / Street Date April 14, 2020 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Paul Wegener, Albert Steinrück, Lyda Salmonova, Ernst Deutsch, Lothar Müthel, Fritz Feld.

Cinematography: Karl Freund, Guido Seeber

Art Direction and design: Hans Poelzig, Kurt Richter, Edgar G. Ulmer

New Music scores: Stephen Horne, Admir Shkurtai,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Resurrection Corporation New Horror Comedy inspired at “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”

Resurrection Corporation New Horror Comedy inspired at “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”
“Resurrection Corporation” a new independent animated movie from italian Director Alberto Genovese (Sick Sock Monsters from Outer space distributed in the World by Troma Entertainment) Caligari is a famous undertaker who’s been on the streets since death itself was banned in the city and supplanted by a practical method of resurrection. It’s a Horror Comedy …

The post Resurrection Corporation New Horror Comedy inspired at “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” appeared first on Hnn | Horrornews.net.
See full article at Horror News »

Centennial: The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (1920)

Centennial: The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (1920)
by Tony Ruggio

1920... Eerily and surprisingly, wasn't so different from 2020. A new generation had upended social norms, a deadly pandemic had spread throughout the world, and a major western democracy was in the throes of a post-war identity crisis. A country in search of a tyrant, Germany was a mere decade away from learning the name Adolf Hitler, and the nation’s artistic output reflected as such.

It’s astonishing to realize that feature films have been around for more than a hundred years, that our grandest medium of pop art has endured for so long. The cinema has persevered through war, competing technology, and economic calamity. Such questions of perseverance are ripe for discussion again in the midst of our current pandemic, one that has shuttered movie theaters around the world. A film like The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, currently streaming on Criterion and now 100 years young, makes clear
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Head

The Head
The Head

DVD – Region 2 Only – No English Audio or Subtitles

Delta Music & Entert. GmbH & Co. Kg

1959 / 1.33:1 / 97 min.

Starring Michel Simon, Horst Frank, Karin Kernke

Cinematography by Georg Krause

Directed by Victor Trivas

A scientist who operates out of a starkly Modernist laboratory of glass and steel, Dr. Ood comes from a long line of German crackpots with a flair for the theatrical. Rotwang, the bug-eyed inventor of Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, springs to mind along with Dr. Gogol, the lovelorn psychopath of Karl Freund’s Mad Love. And not to forget the omniscient Dr. Mabuse. Each man had style to burn and was obsessed with possessing desirable – and controllable – women.

The protagonist of Victor Trivas’s The Head, Ood was the most hands-on of the bunch, satisfying his lust by transplanting the head of a beautiful but misshapen doctor’s assistant to the body of a burlesque queen. Trivas
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed