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‘BoJack Horseman’: Exploring Mortality in ‘The View from Halfway Down’

‘BoJack Horseman’: Exploring Mortality in ‘The View from Halfway Down’
It’s now or never for “BoJack Horseman” to win the Best Animated Series Emmy, and there’s no better representative than the penultimate episode, “The View from Halfway Down.” This summary statement, about titular horse BoJack (Will Arnett) encountering everyone who’s died in the series at a dinner party, forces him to confront the reasons behind his substance abuse and bad behavior. Rather than a dream, the surreal episode turns out to be a near-death experience, with BoJack apparently drowning in his swimming pool, making good on the prophetic image in the main titles.

For director Amy Winfrey, who oversaw 21 episodes throughout the six seasons, “The View from Halfway Down” was a particularly satisfying conclusion. Winfrey not only got to dabble in the ultimate expression of surrealism, but she also got to participate in fun callbacks with some of her favorite characters, including “Horsin’ Around” sitcom creator Herb
See full article at Indiewire »

10 '80s Horror Movies That Deserve A Proper Sequel

10 '80s Horror Movies That Deserve A Proper Sequel
Horror has always been a popular genre of film, dating all the way back to the silent era of cinema with films like The House of the Devil (1896) and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920). The genre has evolved over the decades, but the ‘80s holds a special place in a lot of fans’ hearts. This decade is known for over the top gore created with practical effects, original creative ideas, as well as for popularizing the slasher genre.

Related: The 5 Best (& 5 Worst) '80s Horror Movies

This era of horror is also known for pumping out sequels that rarely lived up to the original, with many films never getting a worthwhile sequel. Others on this list never got a sequel at all, leaving fans to wonder what could have been if the filmmakers would have at least tried to replicate their success.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Movie Poster of the Week: Film Posters from a German Salt Mine

Movie Poster of the Week: Film Posters from a German Salt Mine
Above: German poster for The Strike of the Thieves. Art by Walter Riemer.In 1944, as Allied air raids intensified towards the end of World War II, Germany’s centralized state film archive, the National Socialists’ Reichsfilmarchiv, decided to protect their vast collection of film and film publicity materials by hiding them in a salt mine in Grasleben, 125 miles west of Berlin. After the Allied victory, American units entered the mine and recovered the film reels. But much of the paper material was left behind.In 1986 a treasure trove of German film posters from the first four decades of film history were found, profoundly damaged by a fire, in the mine where they had remained for forty years. Starting in 2017, the posters were recovered, restored, and digitized.Many of those posters are currently on view at the exhibition Burn Marks – Film Posters from a Salt Mine, which opened in June at
See full article at MUBI »

6 Summer Thrillers to Binge in the Safety of Your Own Home

6 Summer Thrillers to Binge in the Safety of Your Own Home
It may feel as if Summer is pretty much canceled due to Covid-19, which gives thriller fans plenty of time to do what they do best: stay inside and read. Here, Rolling Stone has compiled six thrillers you could bring to the beach — or just binge in bed.

Riley Sager, Home Before Dark

A cross between Gillian Flynn’s Dark Places and ghost hunter heir Alexandra Holzer’s autobiography, Sager’s latest is a haunted house story — with a twist. When Maggie Holt’s father dies, leaving her Baneberry Hall,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Strong Slate of German Films Wait in the Wings of Pandemic

Strong Slate of German Films Wait in the Wings of Pandemic
German cinema looks set for an exciting year with forthcoming works that include a high-profile Cannes selection celebrating one of Germany’s most iconic filmmakers, an expressionistic thriller set in 1920s Vienna, a tale of Nazi seduction and a new Thomas Mann adaptation.

The Covid-19 pandemic dashed the excitement of a splashy Cannes premiere for Oskar Roehler’s “Enfant Terrible,” part of the festival’s Official Selection, but the film is nevertheless certain to generate buzz with its portrayal of legendary filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder, and his turbulent film career that spanned 1969 to 1982.

In making the film, Roehler found inspiration in Fassbinder’s own work.

“We didn’t want to do your standard biopic,” says producer Markus Zimmer, managing director of Bavaria Filmproduktion. “I think we did come very close to what Fassbinder would have made out of his own life. We tried to be in line with the artistic
See full article at Variety »

How Kraftwerk’s Synth Wizard Florian Schneider Rewired the World

How Kraftwerk’s Synth Wizard Florian Schneider Rewired the World
Farewell to the great Florian Schneider, co-founder of Kraftwerk, the German electronic duo who changed everything about the way music sounds. “Kraftwerk is not a band,” Schneider told Rolling Stone in 1975. “It’s a concept. We call it ‘Die Menschmaschine,’ which means ‘the human machine.’ We are not the band. I am me. Ralf is Ralf. And Kraftwerk is a vehicle for our ideas.” As his longtime collaborator Ralf Hütter once said, Schneider was the “sound fetishist” of the group — the machine in the mensch-machine.

Kraftwerk always reveled in their reputation as cerebral technocrats.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Golem: how he came into the world

The Golem: how he came into the world
A top movie monster is back from filmic perdition, restored to his full might and power. Rabbi Lowe’s answer to the persecution of the ghetto is a mysterious unthinking automaton capable of terrible destruction. Paul Wegener’s indelible clay statue stands as a core myth in Jewish lore. But he’s still here, usually in allegories about mankind losing control of its own creations. With its imposing architecture and impressive special effects, this early expressionist masterpiece is one of the design highlights of silent cinema.

The Golem

Blu-ray

Kino Classics

1920 / B&w with tints / 1:33 silent ap. / 76 min. / Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam / Street Date April 14, 2020 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Paul Wegener, Albert Steinrück, Lyda Salmonova, Ernst Deutsch, Lothar Müthel, Fritz Feld.

Cinematography: Karl Freund, Guido Seeber

Art Direction and design: Hans Poelzig, Kurt Richter, Edgar G. Ulmer

New Music scores: Stephen Horne, Admir Shkurtai,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Resurrection Corporation New Horror Comedy inspired at “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”

Resurrection Corporation New Horror Comedy inspired at “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”
“Resurrection Corporation” a new independent animated movie from italian Director Alberto Genovese (Sick Sock Monsters from Outer space distributed in the World by Troma Entertainment) Caligari is a famous undertaker who’s been on the streets since death itself was banned in the city and supplanted by a practical method of resurrection. It’s a Horror Comedy …

The post Resurrection Corporation New Horror Comedy inspired at “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” appeared first on Hnn | Horrornews.net.
See full article at Horror News »

Centennial: The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (1920)

Centennial: The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (1920)
by Tony Ruggio

1920... Eerily and surprisingly, wasn't so different from 2020. A new generation had upended social norms, a deadly pandemic had spread throughout the world, and a major western democracy was in the throes of a post-war identity crisis. A country in search of a tyrant, Germany was a mere decade away from learning the name Adolf Hitler, and the nation’s artistic output reflected as such.

It’s astonishing to realize that feature films have been around for more than a hundred years, that our grandest medium of pop art has endured for so long. The cinema has persevered through war, competing technology, and economic calamity. Such questions of perseverance are ripe for discussion again in the midst of our current pandemic, one that has shuttered movie theaters around the world. A film like The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, currently streaming on Criterion and now 100 years young, makes clear
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Head

The Head
The Head

DVD – Region 2 Only – No English Audio or Subtitles

Delta Music & Entert. GmbH & Co. Kg

1959 / 1.33:1 / 97 min.

Starring Michel Simon, Horst Frank, Karin Kernke

Cinematography by Georg Krause

Directed by Victor Trivas

A scientist who operates out of a starkly Modernist laboratory of glass and steel, Dr. Ood comes from a long line of German crackpots with a flair for the theatrical. Rotwang, the bug-eyed inventor of Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, springs to mind along with Dr. Gogol, the lovelorn psychopath of Karl Freund’s Mad Love. And not to forget the omniscient Dr. Mabuse. Each man had style to burn and was obsessed with possessing desirable – and controllable – women.

The protagonist of Victor Trivas’s The Head, Ood was the most hands-on of the bunch, satisfying his lust by transplanting the head of a beautiful but misshapen doctor’s assistant to the body of a burlesque queen. Trivas
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

10 Classic Horror Movies To Impress The Movie Buff In Your Life

10 Classic Horror Movies To Impress The Movie Buff In Your Life
Like most people, all a movie buff really wants from a gift or suggestion is for some honest personal thought to be put into it. But we all feel the desire to not only impress the recipient but to give them something that they’ll genuinely enjoy on its own merits.

Related: 10 Intense British & Irish Horror Movies That You've Probably Never Heard Of

With this in mind, here we have ten great jumping-off points for anyone looking to impress the horror movie buff in their life. It’s a wide genre, with many different sides to access it from, but at least one of these terrific classics should satisfy the most discerning of self-proclaimed film snobs. Even the ones so extreme that they'll turn their nose up at The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari for being too mainstream.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Dozens of 100-Year-Old Photos From the Making of ‘Dr. Caligari’ Go Up For Auction

Dozens of 100-Year-Old Photos From the Making of ‘Dr. Caligari’ Go Up For Auction
A collection of 55 still photos from the 1919-1920 production of “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” are now up for auction, courtesy of Sotheby’s. Robert Wiene’s silent horror film is widely considered the defining work of German Expressionist cinema and went on to inspire the look of such film classics as F. W. Murnau’s “Nosferatu” and Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis.” Bids for the collection can be made through Friday, April 3 at 12pm Et. Sotheby’s estimates the photographs will sell between the $20,000 and $30,000 mark. The starting bid is $13,000.

The catalogue note reads: “This remarkable group of 55 photographs documents many of the psychologically and visually twisted scenes from the 1920 silent film ‘The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,’ generally recognized as the first true horror film. Robert Wiene directed this tale of an insane, diabolical hypnotist who manipulates a somnambulist to execute a series of murders. Considered the first German Expressionist film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Pop Culture Imports: Second Seasons of ‘Kingdom’ and ‘My Brilliant Friend,’ ‘Beastars,’ ‘The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,’ and More

Pop Culture Imports: Second Seasons of ‘Kingdom’ and ‘My Brilliant Friend,’ ‘Beastars,’ ‘The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,’ and More
(Welcome to Pop Culture Imports, a column that compiles the best foreign movies and TV streaming right now.) With the coronavirus pandemic growing and social distancing in full effect, there’s no better time to dip your toes into some foreign-language movies and TV shows that you’ve been meaning to get around to. Whether that be arthouse […]

The post Pop Culture Imports: Second Seasons of ‘Kingdom’ and ‘My Brilliant Friend,’ ‘Beastars,’ ‘The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,’ and More appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Nicolas Cage Will Recreate Face/Off and Con Air Scenes for His Crazy Meta Movie

Nicolas Cage Will Recreate Face/Off and Con Air Scenes for His Crazy Meta Movie
Nicolas Cage continues to be both the worst and greatest actor of all time, simultaneously. His eccentric performances are now the stuff of legend, and so, the news that he will be playing a warped version of himself in an upcoming movie left fans feeling utterly delighted. Well, take a breath because it gets even better.

It seems that the movie, which is entitled The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent (because of course it is) will find the actor recreating some of his greatest movies including Con Air and Face/Off.

"It's a stylised version of me, and the fact I even have to refer to myself in the third person makes me extremely uncomfortable. There are many scenes in the movie where modern or contemporary - here we go - 'Nic Cage' and then young 'Nic Cage' are colliding and arguing and battling it out. It's an acrobatic approach to acting.
See full article at MovieWeb »

At Decade’s End: Celebrating the 10 Most Essential Movies of the 2010s

It seems to be human nature to look back on decades passed and find some kind of greater meaning in what we find there: some kind of pattern or purpose or theme. And, of course, it doesn’t much to find exactly that, given that Siegfried Kracauer’s groundbreaking treatise, From Caligari to Hitler, has long-established that we need look no further than the movies to get an idea of what is going on in the larger societies that produce and consume them. Looking back on the 2010s, it’s very obvious that some very interesting things were bubbling up just under the

At Decade’s End: Celebrating the 10 Most Essential Movies of the 2010s
See full article at TVovermind.com »

December 17th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Trick, Silver Bullet, To The Devil… A Daughter, Universal Horror Collection Volume 3

With Christmas officially just right around the corner, we have one last big push for home media before the big day, just in case you have any last-minute shopping to do. This week’s horror and sci-fi releases make for a pretty great final batch of titles for 2019, too, with Scream Factory at the forefront. Not only have they put together a Collector’s Edition for Silver Bullet (which is probably my most anticipated release of theirs for the entire year), but they’ve also put together a new volume of Universal Horror films and are showing some love to Murders in the Rue Morgue and To The Devil… A Daughter as well.

Ad Astra is also hitting various formats this Tuesday, and if you missed it during its release in October, Patrick Lussier’s Trick comes home on both Blu-ray and DVD this week, too.

Other releases for December 17th include Gags the Clown,
See full article at DailyDead »

The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari with Live Music by The Invincible Czars October 25th at Webster University

“You fools, this man is plotting our doom! We die at dawn! He is Caligari!”

The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari will screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood) Thursday October 25th at 7:30pm. Austin, Texas’ most adventurous band, The Invincible Czars, will provide live music.The band encourages fans and attendees to dress for the Halloween season at these shows. Tickets are $12. A Facebook invite for the event can be found Here

Considered by some to be the first horror film, The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari is thought by many film buffs to be the most influential of all silent films. With the Grandfather of all Twist-Endings, the film is the most brilliant example of that dark and twisted film movement known as German Expressionism, The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari is a plunge into the mind of insanity that severs all ties with the rational world. Director
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Gender Bashing: Martha Marcy May Marlene And Cult Control Of Women’s Bodies

The horror genre has long accessed a universal fear of losing control of our own bodies, in various ways. Proto-zombie joints J’Accuse (1919) and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) brought concepts of “the living dead” and mind control together on the big screen, to monstrous effect. People, separated from their realities and their own […]

The post Gender Bashing: Martha Marcy May Marlene And Cult Control Of Women’s Bodies appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

Joker’ Proves Venice Win No Fluke With More Rave Reactions and Oscar Buzz at Tiff

One of the big questions facing “Joker” after its shocking Golden Lion win at the Venice Film Festival was how film critics and journalists would respond to the film when it touched down at the Toronto International Film Festival. The comic book film’s Venice victory proved to be hugely controversial on social media, leading some to think critical backlash was going to be inevitable at Tiff. Warner Bros. can rest easy as “Joker” made its Tiff debut to more rave reactions and Oscar buzz for Joaquin Phoenix’s transformative lead performance.

“‘Joker’ doesn’t reinvent the comic book movie, but it’s certainly the scariest one — a taut psychological thriller with a few horror movie twists,” IndieWire chief critic Eric Kohn wrote after the film’s first Tiff screening. “Joaquin Phoenix, though, yikes: Looks like he stepped out of ‘The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,’ or maybe he’s still trapped there.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Avengers’ and ‘Game of Thrones’ Spoilers: Just How Much Are We Responsible For Protecting the Element of Surprise?

  • Indiewire
‘Avengers’ and ‘Game of Thrones’ Spoilers: Just How Much Are We Responsible For Protecting the Element of Surprise?
Eric Kohn: We are here to render judgement on the state of spoilers. On the one hand, spoiler culture has become the single most annoying cultural obsession, with the acceleration of social media catalyzing greater paranoia about which plot points should be leaked, in fear that any of them could ruin the prospects of viewing something cold. I also sense a certain degree of commercial exploitation here: When a massive blockbuster event comes along, the marketing hype often hinges on viewers having zero expectations from the start. This allows companies to play off (and usually heighten) audience excitement before it settles into a more accurate assessment of the product at hand. All you spoiler-phones are getting played!

But this is an old story. When “Avengers: Endgame” directors Anthony and Joe Russo implored Marvel junkies on Twitter to join the fun and “#DontSpoiltheEndgame,” their plea joined a continuum: Modern storytelling
See full article at Indiewire »
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