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Dr. Mabuse the Gambler (1922)

Dr. Mabuse, der Spieler (original title)
Arch-criminal Dr. Mabuse sets out to make a fortune and run Berlin. Detective Wenk sets out to stop him.

Director:

Fritz Lang

Writers:

Norbert Jacques (novel), Thea von Harbou (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Rudolf Klein-Rogge ... Dr. Mabuse (as Rudolf Klein Rogge)
Aud Egede-Nissen ... Cara Carozza, the dancer
Gertrude Welcker ... Countess Dusy Told (as Gertrude Welker)
Alfred Abel ... Count Told / Richard Fleury - US version
Bernhard Goetzke ... Prosecutor von Wenk / Chief Inspector Norbert von Wenck / Chief Inspector De Witt - US version
Paul Richter ... Edgar Hull
Robert Forster-Larrinaga Robert Forster-Larrinaga ... Spoerri
Hans Adalbert Schlettow ... Georg, the Chauffeur (as Hans Adalbert von Schlettow)
Georg John ... Pesch
Károly Huszár ... Hawasch (as Karl Huszar)
Grete Berger ... Fine, a servant
Julius Falkenstein ... Karsten
Lydia Potechina ... The Russian
Julius E. Herrmann Julius E. Herrmann ... Emil Schramm (as Julius Herrmann)
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Storyline

Dr. Mabuse and his organization of criminals are in the process of completing their latest scheme, a theft of information that will allow Mabuse to make huge profits on the stock exchange. Afterwards, Mabuse disguises himself and attends the Folies Bergères show, where Cara Carozza, the main attraction of the show, passes him information on Mabuse's next intended victim, the young millionaire Edgar Hull. Mabuse then uses psychic manipulation to lure Hull into a card game where he loses heavily. When Police Commissioner von Wenk begins an investigation of this mysterious crime spree, he has little to go on, and he needs to find someone who can help him. Written by Snow Leopard

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The car seen in the first few minutes of the film, during the train robbery, is a 1911 Brennabor Landaulet Typ F. Brennabor was the biggest auto manufacturer in Germany for part of the 1920s, to be surpassed eventually by Opel. The company stopped producing automobiles by the early 1930s, and went back to producing baby carriages, bicycles and motorcycles. It was finally dismantled in 1945. See more »

Goofs

As Mabuse's driver gasses Von Wenk in the taxi cab, there is a brief cutaway showing Mabuse himself in the back seat instead, clearly a recycled shot from the scene before. See more »

Quotes

Cara Carozza, the dancer: The prosecutor is finally at the end of his rope. And now he hopes to get help from me. From me, a woman who's just as wretched and forsaken as a stray dog.
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Alternate Versions

Soviet editors re-cut the Dr. Mabuse films into one shorter film and titled it "Gilded Putrefaction." See more »

Connections

Referenced in La momia del Titanic (2014) See more »

User Reviews

An Interesting & Occasionally Fascinating Epic
10 September 2004 | by Snow LeopardSee all my reviews

Fritz Lang's epic story of "Dr. Mabuse: The Gambler" is always interesting, and at times fascinating. Lang obviously enjoyed filming this kind of material, and he adds numerous imaginative touches to it. Lang's distinctive approach and Rudolf Klein-Rogge's portrayal of Mabuse give it some lasting images to go with the involved story.

Movies about master criminals are hardly rare, and even the more popular movies of the genre are often shallow and over-praised. In some respects, the story of Dr. Mabuse is similar to most: he has an extensive bag of tricks that he uses to pull off his schemes, and the movie often holds your attention simply by making you guess what he is planning to do next. But there is more psychological depth to the Mabuse story than there is in most such movies, and this is complemented by the distinctive array of settings and the overall portrayal of society, which at times suggest themes that go well beyond the personal battle between Mabuse and the law.

While quite entertaining, this is not really a truly great movie, because on the whole it just does not have that much to say. It is all too easy for film-makers to depict a decadent, morally-neutral society in a way that seems more profound than it really is. Lang is markedly superior to most of the present-day film-makers who try to create Mabuse-style characters and stories, which is why this has enough substance to have held up pretty well over the years.

As entertainment, "Dr. Mabuse: The Gambler" compares well with almost anything of its kind, and it is as good as any of Lang's own films. As a work of art, though, even in Lang's own filmography it has to take a back seat - though perhaps not by a lot - to "Metropolis" and other more profound works.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Germany

Language:

None | German | English | French | Latin | Swedish

Release Date:

30 September 1922 (Hungary) See more »

Also Known As:

Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler part one: The Great Gamble See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Uco-Film GmbH See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(restored) | (part 2) | (part 1) | (part 2) | (part 1) | (video) | (Murnau Foundation restoration)

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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