7.7/10
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90 user 85 critic

Häxan (1922)

Not Rated | | Documentary, Fantasy, History | 27 May 1929 (USA)
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2:12 | Trailer
Fictionalized documentary showing the evolution of witchcraft, from its pagan roots to its confusion with hysteria in Eastern Europe.
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Maren Pedersen Maren Pedersen ... Heksen / The Witch
Clara Pontoppidan ... Nonne / Nun
Elith Pio Elith Pio ... Heksedommer / Witch Judge (The Young Monk)
Oscar Stribolt Oscar Stribolt ... Graabroder / Doctor (The Fat Monk)
Tora Teje ... En hysterisk kvinde / Modern Hysteric (The Kelptomaniac)
John Andersen John Andersen ... Chief Inquisitor (as Johs Andersen)
Benjamin Christensen ... Djævlen / The Devil
Poul Reumert Poul Reumert ... Juveler / Jeweler
Karen Winther Karen Winther ... Anna's Sister
Kate Fabian Kate Fabian ... Gammel jomfru / Old Maid
Else Vermehren Else Vermehren ... Nonne / Nun
Astrid Holm ... Anna
Johannes Andersen Johannes Andersen ... Heksedommer / Witch Judge
Gerda Madsen Gerda Madsen ... Nonne / Nun
Aage Hertel ... Heksedommer / Witch Judge
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Storyline

Part history lesson followed by re-enactments with actors, this film depicts the history of witchcraft from its earliest days through to the present day (in this case,1922 or thereabouts). The result is a documentary-like film that must be among the first to use re-enactments as a visual and narrative tool. From pagan worship to satanic rites to hysteria, the film takes you on a journey through the ages with highly effective visual sequences. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Benjamin Christensens stora film.


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A screenshot from this film was used by the Norwegian black metal band Mayhem as the cover for their 2004 studio album Chimera. See more »

Goofs

The skeletal horse-like creature wandering around during the sabbath is clearly being moved about by a couple of stage hands, hidden under the blanket that covers its "body". The feet of the crew member at the front of the monster are visible in one shot. See more »

Quotes

Title Card: Poor little hysterical witch! In the middle ages you were in conflict with the church. Now it is with the law.
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Crazy Credits

Director Benjamin Christensen personally thanks his cinematographer and art director through the opening titles. See more »

Alternate Versions

Reissued in 1968 with a jazz score featuring Jean-Luc Ponty and narration by author William S. Burroughs. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Bride of Monster Mania (2000) See more »

User Reviews

 
One of the weirdest and most bizarre of all time
5 August 1999 | by MrETrainSee all my reviews

More commonly known as "Witchcraft Through the Ages", this is definitely one of the most bizarre, visually arresting movies of all time, even nearly 80 years later. It starts out as a rather dry documentary, detailing medieval superstitions and folklore while showing ancient woodcarvings of witches and demons in various forms. Then we move on into the dramatic portion of the film. In one scene we see witches concocting potions using the body parts of corpses from the gallows. One witch walks in carrying a bundle of sticks, and undoes the bundle revealing a decomposed human hand hidden inside. Fans of "The Blair Witch Project" should take notice, especially considering that the Danish title of this film is "Haxan", also the name of the movie company that created "Blair Witch".

Director Benjamin Christensen appears as a leering, tongue-wagging Satan, with very realistic makeup. The witches are shown with the Devil and his minions performing various acts of sacrilege and perversion that must have been extremely shocking at the time the movie originally appeared, and would be offensive to many people still. The film was banned for many years because of the depiction of these acts (not to mention the occasional nudity), as well as sacrileges performed by nuns and monks. There are some stop-motion animation sequences (pre-Harryhousen, no less) that are very good, especially for the time. This is a difficult movie to describe. It really is something that you'd have to see for yourself.

The version I am reviewing is actually the re-issue from 1966, with a dubbed-over narration by beat novelist/junkie William Burroughs, and a modern, jazzy score featuring Jean-Luc Ponty. I enjoyed Burroughs' narration quite a bit, but oftimes the music is annoyingly inappropriate. Sometimes it works very well, but most of the time I was wishing for a standard orchestral, or vitaphone, score. A Klezmer score, even, would have been very effective. There are a few different versions available, some with subtitles and an orchestral score. Maybe one of these days they'll come out with a version featuring the Burroughs narration along with a more appropriate orchestral score. That would be perfect. As it is, this an impressive, compulsively watchable film that still goes further than most dare to go, even in these much more permissive times.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Sweden | Denmark

Language:

Swedish | Danish

Release Date:

27 May 1929 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Häxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages See more »

Filming Locations:

Copenhagen, Denmark See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

SEK2,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (1968 re-release) | (DVD) | (original) | (esoteric cut)

Sound Mix:

Mono | Silent

Color:

Black and White (Sepiatone)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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