8.2/10
88,847
170 user 117 critic

The Gold Rush (1925)

Not Rated | | Adventure, Comedy, Drama | 1925 (Germany)
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1:25 | Trailer

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ON DISC
A prospector goes to the Klondike in search of gold and finds it and more.

Director:

Charles Chaplin

Writer:

Charles Chaplin
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Popularity
3,311 ( 4,256)
Top Rated Movies #139 | Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Charles Chaplin ... The Lone Prospector
Mack Swain ... Big Jim McKay
Tom Murray Tom Murray ... Black Larsen
Henry Bergman Henry Bergman ... Hank Curtis
Malcolm Waite Malcolm Waite ... Jack Cameron
Georgia Hale ... Georgia
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Storyline

A lone prospector ventures into Alaska looking for gold. He gets mixed up with some burly characters and falls in love with the beautiful Georgia. He tries to win her heart with his singular charm. Written by John J. Magee <magee@helix.mgh.harvard.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

1925 (Germany) See more »

Also Known As:

La quimera del oro See more »

Filming Locations:

California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$923,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$5,450,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(original) | (1942 re-release) | (edited) | (1925 reconstructed)

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System) (1942 re-issue)| Silent (original release)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

While searching for a new leading lady, Chaplin rediscovered Lita Grey, whom he had employed, as a pretty 12-year-old, in The Kid (1921). Still not yet sixteen, Lillita was put under contract and re-named Lita Grey. Chaplin quickly embarked on a clandestine affair with her; and when the film was six months into shooting, Lita discovered she was pregnant. Chaplin found himself forced into a marriage which brought misery to both partners, though it produced two sons, Charles Jr. and Sydney Chaplin. As a result of these events, production for The Gold Rush (1925) was shut down for three months. See more »

Goofs

When Big Jim is so delirious that he thinks The Lone Prospector is a chicken, The Lone Prospector removes a knife from the table and hides it in the bed. In one of the next shots, the knife is back on the table. Then in the next shot it is gone again. See more »

Quotes

Georgia: I guess you're lonesome here.
The Lone Prospector: Yes Mam.
Georgia: Why don't you invite us to dinner sometime?
The Lone Prospector: Oo! Yes Mam.
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Alternate Versions

Chaplin altered the credits of the 1942 version to remove references to United Artists, which can be seen in an Argentinean print (with the titles in Spanish) preserved by the Fundación Cinemateca Argentina. The 2003 DVD release retains the United Artists credit. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Who Wants to Be a Millionaire: Episode #7.81 (2009) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

A Worthy Silent Classic
6 August 2001 | by Snow LeopardSee all my reviews

This silent classic has many strong points - it has a lot of humor, interesting characters, a good story and good settings. It's the kind of film that shows how much a master film-maker can communicate in a silent movie. It overdoes the sentimentality on occasion, but other than that it's a fine film.

Chaplin himself plays the 'Lone Prospector', and he is joined by several other interesting characters in a frozen north setting that sets up some good adventures and drama. There are some memorable scenes in the prospectors' rickety cabins, plus some other good material.

The version of this that is the easiest to find is the one that Chaplin re-edited in the 1940's, adding his own narration and deleting the title cards, which gives it a slightly different feel. (These revisions probably make it a bit easier to follow for those who aren't used to silent films.) You can tell from Chaplin's narration how fond he must have been of "The Gold Rush", and he had a lot of good reasons to be pleased with it. There are a couple of his later films that might be even better and more timeless, but this one contains everything that defined Chaplin and his art.


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