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The White Outlaw (1929)

Known as the White Outlaw for the kerchief he wears, Johnny Douglas decides to go straight. Getting a job as a cowhand he gives the kerchief to his new friend Ted Williams. When the ... See full summary »

Director:

Robert J. Horner

Writer:

Robert McKenzie (as Bob McKenzie)
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Cast

Cast overview:
Art Acord ... Johnny 'The White Outlaw' Douglas
Vivian Bay Vivian Bay ... Janice Holbrook (as Vivian May)
Bill Patton Bill Patton ... Ted Williams
Dick Nores Dick Nores ... Chet Wagner
Lew Meehan ... Jed Isbell
Betty Carter Betty Carter ... Mary Holbrook
Al Hoxie ... Sheriff Ralston
Howard Davies ... Colonel Holbrook
Walter Maly ... Deputy Bud Mason
Slim Mathews Slim Mathews ... Joe Walton
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Storyline

Known as the White Outlaw for the kerchief he wears, Johnny Douglas decides to go straight. Getting a job as a cowhand he gives the kerchief to his new friend Ted Williams. When the rancher's daughter, the girl friend of Ted, agrees to marry the man holding the note on the ranch so he won't foreclose, Ted uses the kerchief when he robs the stage. When Ted is spotted and jailed, Johnny has a plan to return the money and clear Ted. Written by Maurice VanAuken <vanauken@comcast.net>

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Genres:

Western

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 January 1929 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(DVD)

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Remade as The Apache Kid's Escape (1930) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Dusty Trails
14 December 2004 | by hwollsteinSee all my reviews

THE WHITE OUTLAW is the kind of quickly thrown together silent western where they never watered down the trails with the result that horses and riders disappear in huge clouds of dust. It is also the kind of film where the interior of a rather large saloon doesn't exactly resemble the exterior, which is a mere shack, where the heroine is especially dowdy-looking, and where the director (in this case the famous one-legged Bob Horner) takes time out to photograph the antics of an annoying and completely superfluous child actress. That aside, this is also one of the few chances to see a genuine silent cowboy star, Art Acord, shortly before hard living finally killed him; and it is definitely the ONLY chance to see Acord with two lesser cowboy heroes, Bill Patton and Al Hoxie. The latter always denied ever having worked with Acord, and his footage is probably lifted from another movie altogether. Which is again typical of the kind of slipshod rural film-making that produced westerns like THE WHITE OUTLAW.


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