6.7/10
784
19 user 12 critic

Dimples (1936)

Approved | | Family, Musical | 16 October 1936 (USA)
Clip
1:09 | Clip
Dimples Appleby lives with the pick-pocket grandfather in 19th century New York City. She entertains the crowds while he works his racket. A rich lady makes it possible for the girl to go legit. "Uncle Tom's Cabin" is performed.

Director:

William A. Seiter

Writers:

Arthur Sheekman (screen play), Nat Perrin (screen play)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Shirley Temple ... Dimples Appleby
Frank Morgan ... Prof. Eustace Appleby
Robert Kent ... Allen Drew
Helen Westley ... Mrs. Caroline Drew
Stepin Fetchit ... Cicero
Astrid Allwyn ... Cleo Marsh
Brook Byron ... Betty Loring (as Delma Byron)
Hall Johnson Choir Hall Johnson Choir ... Choir (as The Hall Johnson Choir)
Berton Churchill ... Col. Loring
Paul Stanton ... Mr. St. Clair
Julius Tannen ... Hawkins
John Carradine ... Richards
Billy McClain Billy McClain ... Rufus
Jack Rube Clifford Jack Rube Clifford ... Uncle Tom (as Jack Clifford)
Betty Jean Hainey Betty Jean Hainey ... Topsy
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Storyline

Dimples is a busker - a street entertainer, and lives in mid-19th century New York City's Bowery with her kindhearted but pickpocketing Grandfather, Prof. Eustace Appleby. Dimples is a talented child and is hired to perform at a party in the home of Mrs. Caroline Drew, an elderly widow living in Washington Square. Dimples delights the gathering and charms not only the elderly mistress of the house but her nephew Allen as well, a theatrical producer betrothed to a lovely society belle. Allen engages Dimples to perform the role of Little Eva in his production of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" while Mrs. Drew makes it possible for Dimples to remain in her genteel home and enjoy its benefits. Various complications ensue and Dimples bravely makes the decision to sacrifice her happiness to return to her slum dwelling Grandfather. Mrs. Drew traces Dimples's whereabouts and convinces Prof. Appleby that his lovely granddaughter deserves something better than a life of poverty and crime in the Bowery. The... Written by eamon

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Genres:

Family | Musical

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Two lines in the end cast list credits are subject to two different interpretations: "Children's Band ... Leonard Kibrick" and "Walter and George Weidler." The IMDb cast lists three actors: Leonard Kibrick Warner, Walter Weidler and George Weidler. However, The AFI Catalogue lists four actors: Leonard Kibrick, Warner Weidler, Walter Weidler and George Weidler. See more »

Goofs

The movie is set in 1850 but the song, "Little Brown Jug" (heard during a scene), was not written until 1869. See more »

Quotes

Dimples: Sometimes I wonder if men are worth all the trouble they give us.
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Alternate Versions

Also available in a computer colorized version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Shirley Temple: America's Little Darling (1993) See more »

Soundtracks

Picture Me Without You
(1936) (uncredited)
Music by Jimmy McHugh
Lyrics by Ted Koehler
Sung by Shirley Temple
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User Reviews

 
Entertaining sub-Dickensian tear-jerker...
25 May 2008 | by moonspinner55See all my reviews

Shirley Temple plays a singing, dancing street urchin in 1850 New York City whose multi-racial music troupe is managed by her pickpocket grandfather (he uses the kids as ruse for robbery); when a rich matron takes kindly to the youngster, the wily grandpa has to decide whether to sell the child for five grand (in the hopes she'll have a better life) or continue living happily together in squalor. Not-bad star vehicle allows Shirley to be more sly and precocious than in some of her other pictures. She stumbles over big words (like 'peneteniary') which seems out of character, though her scene with Mrs. Drew returning a stolen clock is funny ("I'm so wicked, I don't know what's to become of me."). Temple was always goaded into acting like a wise-beyond-her-years wind-up doll, but here she has a more distinct personality, and the director gives her time to think things through. She's still far too choreographed (in both her acting and dancing), but her responses seem pretty fresh, and matching her with Frank Morgan was a good casting move (they play off each other warmly). Interesting subtext about racial equality, as well as some clever material aligning the desperation of 1850 with Depression-era audiences circa 1936. **1/2 from ****


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 October 1936 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Bowery Princess See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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