6.0/10
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6 user 4 critic

Robin Hood of El Dorado (1936)

Approved | | Biography, Drama, History | 17 March 1936 (USA)
In the 1840's Mexico has ceded California to the United States, making life nearly impossible for the Mexican population due to the influx of land and gold-crazy Americans. Farmer Joaquin ... See full summary »

Director:

William A. Wellman

Writers:

Walter Noble Burns (book), William A. Wellman (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Warner Baxter ... Joaquin Murrieta
Ann Loring ... Señorita Juanita de la Cuesta
Bruce Cabot ... Bill Warren
Margo ... Rosa F. 'Rosita' de Murrieta
J. Carrol Naish ... Three Fingered Jack
Soledad Jiménez ... Madre Murrieta (as Soledad Jimenez)
Carlos De Valdez Carlos De Valdez ... José Murrieta (as Carlos de Valdez)
Eric Linden ... Johnnie 'Jack' Warren
Edgar Kennedy ... Sheriff Judd
Charles Trowbridge ... Ramon de la Cuesta
Harvey Stephens ... Capt. Osborne
Ralph Remley Ralph Remley ... Judge Hank Perkins
George Regas ... Tomás
Francis McDonald ... Pedro
Kay Hughes ... Louise
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Storyline

In the 1840's Mexico has ceded California to the United States, making life nearly impossible for the Mexican population due to the influx of land and gold-crazy Americans. Farmer Joaquin Murrieta revenges the death of his wife against the four Americans who killed her and is branded an outlaw. The reward for his capture is increased as he subsequently kills the men who brutally murder his brother. Joining with bandit Three Fingered Jack, Murrieta raises an army of disaffected Mexicans and goes on a rampage against the Americans, finally forcing his erstwhile friend, Bill Warren, to lead a posse against him. Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

LEADER of Men...and of WOMEN! Not since Warner Baxter thrilled you in "In Old Arizona", such a glorious figure! Not since "Viva Villa" such magnificent romance! (original poster) See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film's initial telecast in Los Angeles took place Tuesday 13 August 1957 on KTTV (Channel 11); it first aired in Seattle 21 September 1957 on KING (Channel 5), in Philadelphia 24 September 1957 on WFIL (Channel 6), in Portland OR 5 October 1957 on KGW (Channel 8), in New Haven CT 9 October 1957 on WNHC (Channel 8), in Honolulu 10 December 1957 on KHVH (Channel 13), in Tampa 12 December 1957 on WFLA (Channel 8), in Phoenix 27 January 1958 on KPHO (Channel 5), in Columbus 25 February 1958 on WLW-C (Channel 4), in Tucson 17 March 1958 on KVOA (Channel 4), in San Antonio 29 March 1958 on WOAI (Channel 4), in Cleveland 27 April 1958 on KYW (Channel 3), and in San Francisco 29 September 1958 on KGO (Channel 7); it first aired in Chicago 23 October 1959 on WBBM (Channel 2), and in New York City 29 August 1961 on WCBS (Channel 2). See more »

Goofs

The film takes place in the 1840s, yet the guns are mostly repeaters which were not in use yet (though a few might have existed). All pistols are clearly revolvers, rifles are repeaters. Yet the Mexican encampment has a storehouse with kegs of powder, and during the shootout there, several people die trying to bring back a keg of black powder as they were running out of ammo, which would have been useless as they needed bullets not powder. See more »

Alternate Versions

The version shown in Great Britain was modified to satisfy the censors. Scenes showing horses falling, the depiction of J. Carrol Naish being shot to death after the fighting scene, and references to cutting off Chinese men's ears, were all eliminated. These scenes are in the Turner library version shown on Turner Classic Movies. See more »

Soundtracks

Bridal Chorus (Here Comes the Bride)
(uncredited)
from "Lohengrin"
Written by Richard Wagner (1850)
Sung by the townfolk as the coach arrives with the bride
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User Reviews

 
Unique and engaging
29 December 2007 | by MartinHaferSee all my reviews

The film begins with the wedding of Joaquin Murrieta to his devoted young bride in California in 1848--just after the territory was ceded to the United States from Mexico after the Mexican War. Joaquin and his fellow Mexicans are uncertain what to expect under American rule and unfortunately matters are made much worse when gold is discovered--lawlessness and injustice seem inextricably connected to the Gold Rush. While affecting all the Hispanic community in the film, it's worst for Joaquin because Anglos rape and kill his wife (the rape is strongly implied in the film) and a bit later an insane lynch mob kills his brother. Feeling he had no other choice, Joaquin joined a group of bandits and soon increased their number and became a major force for evil. Only later, when it is perhaps too late, does he realize that his actions are wrong and he repents of his new wicked ways.

The plot for this film is quite exciting and Warner Baxter did an excellent job playing lead--as did J. Carrol Naish as his hot-tempered sidekick, "Three fingered Jack". While they were not Hispanic actors, they did credible jobs in the film and I was impressed that the film tried to give Joaquin and his men some humanity and sense of purpose. They were not just mindless killers or bandits. Oddly, Bruce Cabot, a man known for playing bad guys in 1930s and 40s films, plays a very decent and likable guy in this film--one who understands why Joaquin chose a life of crime and sympathizes with his plight. The film has enough action and plot to make it more than just another time-passer.

What makes this excellent film so interesting, though, is that after I finished watching it I did a search on Google and found that there really was a famous bandit named Joaquin Murrieta at the time. However, many of his exploits seem rather legendary and the exact story is muddled over time. How much of the Murrieta saga is based on his movie portrayals and how much of it is true is open to debate.

FYI--Though the movie is set in 1848, gun aficionados will notice that there are LOTS of repeating pistols and rifles in the film--something you would have probably not seen at the time. While there were a very few revolvers and multi-shot rifles in 1848, they were mostly experimental and took ages to load--most being hand-loaded without cartridges. Actual cartridges were super rare and were only seen about a decade later and even by the time the Civil War took place, most weapons were single-shot--taking 30 seconds to a minute to reload. This film just seemed to use the same .45s and other guns you'd find in a Western set in the 1870s. Again and again, people fired and reloaded with great ease--and this would not have been the case in the 1840s.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 March 1936 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Robin des Bois d'Eldorado See more »

Filming Locations:

Sonora, California, USA

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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