During World War I, believing her fiancé to be dead, a young ballerina loses her job and is forced to turn to prostitution.

Director:

Mervyn LeRoy

Writers:

S.N. Behrman (screen play), Hans Rameau (screen play) | 2 more credits »
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Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Vivien Leigh ... Myra
Robert Taylor ... Roy Cronin
Lucile Watson ... Lady Margaret Cronin
Virginia Field ... Kitty
Maria Ouspenskaya ... Madame Olga Kirowa
C. Aubrey Smith ... The Duke
Janet Shaw ... Maureen
Janet Waldo ... Elsa
Steffi Duna ... Lydia
Virginia Carroll ... Sylvia
Leda Nicova Leda Nicova ... Marie
Florence Baker ... Beatrice
Margery Manning Margery Manning ... Mary
Frances MacInerney Frances MacInerney ... Violet
Eleanor Stewart ... Grace
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Storyline

On the eve of World War II, a British officer revisits Waterloo Bridge and recalls the young man he was at the beginning of World War I and the young ballerina he met just before he left for the front. Myra stayed with him past curfew and is thrown out of the corps de ballet. She survives on the streets of London, falling even lower after she hears her true love has been killed in action. But he wasn't killed. Those terrible years were nothing more than a bad dream is Myra's hope after Roy finds her and takes her to his family's country estate. Written by Dale O'Connor <daleoc@interaccess.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

"Gone With the Wind's" tempestuous heroine...romantic Robert Taylor...in the ever-great, ever timely, ever new romance! (print ad - Lubbock Avalanche Journal - Palace Theatre - Lubbock, Texas - January 7, 1945) See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | War

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Of all the classic Hollywood films ever made, this somewhat obscure title happens to be one of the most popular in China, especially among college students. There are even audio guides for students to practice their English by reciting dialogue from this film. The reason for why this particular film has become so endeared among the Chinese is anyone's guess. One possibility is that the popularity of Gone with the Wind (1939) in China led many to seek other movies starring Vivien Leigh. See more »

Goofs

At the beginning of the movie, Roy asks his driver to let him off when they reach Waterloo Bridge so that he can walk across, and have the driver pick him up at the other end. The film proper is a flashback that takes place during his stroll. But in the final shot, when they should be driving away from the bridge, we see them starting to drive across it. See more »

Quotes

Roy Cronin: Goodbye, little sentimentalist.
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Alternate Versions

Also shown in computer colorized version. See more »

Connections

Version of Waterloo Bridge (1931) See more »

Soundtracks

Let Me Call You Sweetheart
(1910) (uncredited)
Written by Beth Slater Whitson and Leo Friedman
Played as dance music at the estate dance given by Lady Margaret
Played as background music
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User Reviews

 
A worthy remake...
25 March 2017 | by AlsExGalSee all my reviews

... and I can hardly ever say that about precode films remade in the production code era.

The original Waterloo Bridge starred Mae Clarke and was considered a pre-code, with more stark portrayal and language about the heroine's fate. Although this 1940 version was under the heavy hand of the censors, I still like it just as much as the original version. Basically we have a young woman who believes the man she loves is dead and has no way to survive but the world's oldest profession. It's not a fate she chooses, just one that she has to choose in order to eat. Yet society judges her although nobody gives her an alternative.

Everyone remembers Vivien Leigh for "Gone with the Wind", but I think that this film and "That Hamilton Woman" are truly her best performances. The romance and chemistry between her and Robert Taylor is genuine, and just adds to the tragedy of the entire film, and then there's the final scene - which I can't tell you about without spoiling it for you. Just let me say that one piece of jewelry and one line spoken in remembrance makes the film complete.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

17 May 1940 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Waterloo Bridge See more »

Filming Locations:

Bath, Somerset, England, UK See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$31,111
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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