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Blood and Sand (1941)

Approved | | Drama, Sport | 30 May 1941 (USA)
Trailer
2:51 | Trailer
Illiterate peasant Juan Gallardo rises meteorically to fame and fortune in the bullfight arena only to sow the seeds of his own fall.

Director:

Rouben Mamoulian

Writers:

Vicente Blasco Ibáñez (based on the novel by) (as Vicente Blasco Ibanez), Jo Swerling (screenplay)
Reviews
Won 1 Oscar. Another 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tyrone Power ... Juan Gallardo
Linda Darnell ... Carmen Espinosa
Rita Hayworth ... Doña Sol
Alla Nazimova ... Señora Augustias (as Nazimova)
Anthony Quinn ... Manolo de Palma
J. Carrol Naish ... Garabato
Lynn Bari ... Encarnacion
John Carradine ... El Nacional
Laird Cregar ... Natalio Curro
Monty Banks ... Antonio Lopez (as William Montague)
Vicente Gómez Vicente Gómez ... Guitarist (as Vicente Gomez)
George Reeves ... Captain Pierre Lauren
Pedro de Cordoba ... Don Jose Alvarez (as Pedro deCordoba)
Fortunio Bonanova ... Pedro Espinosa
Victor Kilian ... Priest
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Storyline

Bullfighter Juan Gallardo falls for socialite Dona Sol, turning from the faithful Carmen who nevertheless stands by her man as he continues to face real danger in the bullring. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Love flamed in the shadow of death!

Genres:

Drama | Sport

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The picture also marked the return to Hollywood of actor/director Monty Banks, who is billed onscreen as William Montague. Although Banks had appeared as an actor in several English productions during the 1930s, his last appearance in an American film had been in A Perfect Gentleman (1928). See more »

Goofs

During the scene when Doña Sol des Muire sings to Juan Gallardo on his first visit to her home, she accompanies herself on the guitar, but while she strums the fingers of her other hand never move to change chords as she plays. See more »

Quotes

Waiter: What will you have?
Juan Gallardo: What will you have?
Doña Sol des Muire: Champagne!
Juan Gallardo: Champagne.
Waiter: Champagne?
Juan Gallardo: Sí, champagne!
Waiter: Champagne?
See more »

Alternate Versions

It was planned to add more bullfighting scenes for distribution to South American countries, where the sport of bullfighting was much more acceptable. No details are available. See more »

Connections

Featured in M*A*S*H: O.R. (1974) See more »

Soundtracks

Melodia de Sor
(uncredited)
Music by Fernando Sor
Performed by Vicente Gómez
See more »

User Reviews

 
Quinn and Hayworth's Pasadoble remains one of the movie's best remembered moments..
10 November 2001 | by Nazi_Fighter_DavidSee all my reviews

'The Mark of Zorro' and 'Blood and Sand' confirmed Rouben Mamoulian's enduring concern with drama conveyed through movement of characters and camera... The former was a rousing, deliciously ironic swashbuckler; the latter an adaptation of Ibañez's story about a simple country boy whose success as a matador leads him into temptation and towards a violent early death... Rudolph Valentino had scored one of his biggest success with 'Blood and Sand' in 1922, and the same story served as a Tyrone Power vehicle nineteen years later...

Color, and Mamoulian's almost choreographic direction, turned the motion picture into an exquisite melodrama, where all the passes and swirls of the bullring were vividly depicted: The parade of the bullfighters and their entourage, the race of the vicious predator into the arena, the matadors flashing their yellow and pink capes...

Rita Hayworth blood-red lips and scarlet fingernails, contrast the cool colors of her Spanish mansion, and show her off to glittering advantage...

In her sensuous screen Pasadoble with Anthony Quinn, she looks sensational in her rose evening gown, symbolic of the Spanish bullfight flavor...

The arrogant and passionate dance, based on Flamenco dancing that characterizes the man as the matador and the lady as his red cape, is performed with style and surety... The colors, rose and green, are blended to perfection with the amazing prowess of an appealing couple in tune with the balanced perfection of shapes and the sweeping movements of Rita Hayworth...

Quinn is perfect for redoing old Valentino roles... He always demonstrated his grace and remarkable agility on the dance floor... This sequence remains one of the movie's best remembered moments...

Mamoulian begins the film with a 30 minute prologue, establishing the characters ten years before the main narrative...

Juanillo, just a little boy with fire, vigorously illiterate but possessing his father's passion for bullfighting, is seen by night currently taking the bullfighting world by storm... Not least for his exceptional brave and agile style of fighting but also for his age... Juanillo adores the art of bullfighting... Hr runs off to Madrid with his boyhood friends, Manolo, Nacional Pablo and La Pulga...

After winning a certain reputation as a 'flat-footed novillero,' Juan (Tyrone Power) returns years later to Seville to marry his childhood sweetheart, Carmen Espinosa (Linda Darnell - a voluptuous beauty with perfect complexion), and brings her to live in his luxurious home where he has installed his mother (Alla Nazimona) and his sister, Encarnacion (Lynn Bari).

Then he goes on to become the 'first matador in Spain' showing his individual personality by the combination and variations of his passes... Juan brings the bull past his body with the elegance of a premier ballet dancer, making it seem effortless and beautiful...

As his popularity climbs Juan's entourage of hangers-on increases joining his boyhood friends Nacional (John Carradine), Manolo de Palma (Anthony Quinn), La Pulga (Michael Morris), Pablo Gomez (Charles Stevens), Sebastian (William Montague), and his loyal dresser, Garabato (J. Carrol Naish) who left the ring just as he came in to it, 'without a peseta.'

But all is not so perfect in the ranks of Juan's cuadrilla... Nacional is anxious to leave bullfighting for politics, and Manolo, jealous of Juan's success, wants to make his own name in the ring... And then there is the on-going feud Juan has been engaging in with Natalio Curro (Laird Cregar), the famous bullfight critic who had insulted the memory of his father...

When Juan established himself as Spain's most important matador, Curro opportunistically affirms: 'At last Sevilla has a matador. The greatest matador of all history. The first man of the world. The day he was born, there was salt in the air, a great quantity of salt.'

And at one of Juan's 'great afternoon', we are introduced to the stunning Doña Sol des Muire (Rita Hayworth) whose chief passion is bullfighting and, in particular, handsome matadors...

The torrid Spanish beauty had little difficulty, in luring the new risen star away from his home...

Falling under her tempting beauty, Juan begins an affair with her at the expense of both his faithful wife and his career... His skills as a matador go downhill and his bad attitude loses him all his once loyal friends...

'Blood and Sand' is sensitively directed by Mamoulian and might be considered one of the greatest examples of Technicolor film-making... The film won an Oscar for Best Color Cinematography, and was nominated for Best Interior Set Decoration...


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 May 1941 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Blood and Sand See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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