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Beyond Bond: Sean Connery’s 14 Most Memorable Non-007 Film Roles

Beyond Bond: Sean Connery’s 14 Most Memorable Non-007 Film Roles
Darby O’Gill and the Little People” (1959) Sean Connery’s first major Hollywood role came in this Disney film about a wily Irishman battling local leprechauns. The New York Times dismissed his performance, as a Dubliner who woos Darby’s daughter as “merely tall, dark and handsome.”

Marnie” (1964)

After breaking out big time as James Bond in 1962’s “Dr. No” and the 1963 sequel “From Russia With Love,” Connery snuck in a role in this Alfred Hitchcock thriller as a wealthy widower who both falls for a mysterious woman with a checkered past played by Tippi Hedren.

The Hill” (1965)

In this BAFTA Award-winning Sidney Lumet drama, Connery starred as a former squadron leader who bucks against authority in a British Army prison during World War II.

Murder on the Orient Express” (1974)

Connery is one of many standouts in this star-studded ensemble mystery based on Agatha Christie’s classic novel.

The Man Who Would Be King
See full article at The Wrap »

Sean Connery Turns 90: Why He Was the Greatest James Bond of All

Sean Connery Turns 90: Why He Was the Greatest James Bond of All
Sean Connery helped redefine movie stardom thanks to his role as James Bond, an impossibly suave super-spy with a taste for martinis that were shaken, not stirred. In films like “Dr. No,” “Goldfinger,” and “You Only Live Twice,” the Scottish actor created a template for a fresh and exciting action hero, one whose womanizing, hard-drinking ways and penchant to solve any dispute with the barrel of a Walther Ppk presaged a new and more permissive era of on-screen sex and violence.

The man who would be 007 turns 90 on Tuesday and has been off the silver screen since opting to retire in 2003 after appearing in the execrable “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.” (Why do the great ones go out with a whimper? Here’s looking at you Gene Hackman/”Welcome to Mooseport”). However, his legacy continues to reverberate — it can be felt in everything from Tom Cruise’s globe-trotting “Mission: Impossible
See full article at Variety »

Sellers Place Key Pics in Cannes Virtual Market

Sellers Place Key Pics in Cannes Virtual Market
The Cannes Marché du Film, along with a sales initiative led by Hollywood agencies, is hosting the first major virtual market since the start of pandemic, starting on June 23. Distributors and sales agents are looking forward to it: the turn-up for the online Cannes Marché du Film is significant with more than 7,000 accredited participants as of mid-June.

“As nobody can leave their house, a virtual market is the next best thing. It’s a valid and worthwhile effort … people need something to initiate interactions. If this virtual market can help in some way to stimulate business that’s a great thing,” says Dylan Leiner at Sony Pictures Classics.

Here’s a look at some key titles for sale:

Balestra

Director: Nicole Dorsey

Producers: Pierre Even

A disgraced competitive fencer (Tessa Thompson) is aiming for her Olympic comeback. She receives a prototype device allowing her to extend her training into her
See full article at Variety »

Cannes Hidden Gem: Battling Two-Foot Terrors in Jon Wright's Creature Feature 'The Little People'

Cannes Hidden Gem: Battling Two-Foot Terrors in Jon Wright's Creature Feature 'The Little People'
Two feet, filmmaker Jon Wright and his team have established, is the optimum height for a creature you don’t want to find in your bedroom. "For something coming around the foot of the bed," the Northern Irish director of Grabbers, Tormented and Robot Overlords clarifies. "Actually, to be totally accurate, it’s slightly shorter than two feet."

This rather unique bit of research has been rather crucial for Wright’s next project, The Little People, a home invasion horror in which — as the title suggests — stature plays an important role.

Rather enticingly billed as "Gremlins meets ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Mark Rylance to lead Cornerstone’s ‘The Fantastic Flitcrofts’

Mark Rylance to lead Cornerstone’s ‘The Fantastic Flitcrofts’
Craig Roberts to direct biopic that will be introduced at the virtual Cannes market.

Oscar-winner Mark Rylance is to play a golfing folk hero in The Fantastic Flitcrofts, which Cornerstone Films is set to introduce to buyers at the Cannes virtual market next week.

Craig Roberts (Just Jim) will direct a screenplay by Simon Farnaby (Paddington 2) about Maurice Flitcroft, who managed to gain entry to the British Open Golf Championship in 1976 and subsequently shot the worst round in Open history, becoming a folk hero in the process.

Based on a true story, the screenplay is based on book The Phantom Of The Open,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Gremlins Meets Straw Dogs In New Creature Feature The Little People

Gremlins Meets Straw Dogs In New Creature Feature The Little People
Cornerstone Films has snagged worldwide sales rights to Grabbers director Jon Wright’s “Gremlins meets Straw Dogs” creature feature The Little People. It’s all set to kick off production this fall in the U.K. and is based on an original screenplay by Wright and Mark Stay (Robot Overlords). It centers on Londoners Maya and Jamie who escape […] More
See full article at Dread Central »

Cornerstone boards world sales on Jon Wright’s UK goblin horror ‘The Little People’

Cornerstone boards world sales on Jon Wright’s UK goblin horror ‘The Little People’
Alison Thompson to present creature feature at upcoming Cannes virtual market.

Cornerstone Films has picked up worldwide sales rights to The Little People, the latest feature from UK director Jon Wright.

It will present the film to buyers at this month’s Cannes virtual market (June 22-26).

Wright, whose previous features include Robot Overlords (2014), Grabbers (2012), and Tormented (2009), directs and co-wrote the screenplay with Mark Stay.

The film also reunites several of the creative team from Grabbers, including prosthetics supervisor Shaune Harrison, concept artist Paul Catling, and VFX supervisor Paddy Eason.

The Little People follows a pair of Londoners who escape
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cornerstone Films Boards Jon Wright Creature Feature ‘The Little People’ — Cannes

Cornerstone Films Boards Jon Wright Creature Feature ‘The Little People’ — Cannes
Cornerstone Films is launching world sales on UK director Jon Wright’s (Grabbers) creature feature The Little People.

Described by Wright as “Gremlins meets Straw Dogs”, the film is based on an original screenplay by Mark Stay (Robot Overlords) and Wright.

The feature followers Londoners Maya and Jamie who escape their urban nightmare to the tranquility of rural Ireland only to discover malevolent, murderous goblins lurking in the gnarled, ancient wood at the foot of their new garden.

The movie reunites the Grabbers creature team, including prosthetics by Shaune Harrison (Avengers: Age of Ultron), creature designs by Paul Catling (Maleficent) and VFX supervisor Paddy Eason (28 Weeks Later).

Producers are Piers Tempest and Jo Bamford’s Tempo Productions (Military Wives) with Cornerstone Films and Peter Touche (Unhinged) of Ingenious Media executive producing. Janine Modder, who has worked on the Bond franchise since 1997, is part of the producing team, with production
See full article at Deadline »

Cannes: "Creature Feature" Horror 'The Little People' Heading to Online Market With Cornerstone

Cannes:
This month's inaugural Cannes Marche du Film Online has a horror feature for its digital catalog.

Cornerstone Films has picked up worldwide sales rights to U.K. director Jon Wright’s (Grabbers, Robot Overlords, Tormented) upcoming "creature feature" The Little People.

Described by Wright as "Gremlins meets Straw Dogs" the film is based on an original screenplay by him and Mark Stay (Robot Overlords).

Londoners Maya and Jamie escape their urban nightmare to the tranquility of rural Ireland only to discover malevolent, murderous goblins lurking in the gnarled, ancient wood at the foot of their new garden. When heavily pregnant ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Class of 1987: Director Tibor Takács Reflects on His Coming-of-Age Horror Fairy Tale The Gate

1987 was an exceedingly awesome year for kid-centric horror movies. In the span of just a few months, we were treated to both Tibor TakácsThe Gate and Fred Dekker’s The Monster Squad, and honestly, there may have not been a better year to be a young genre fan during that decade than in good ol’ 1987. And while there were an incredible amount of quality horror movies for this writer to dig into from that 12-month span of releases, one movie that I always had a deep appreciation for was The Gate, a story that I related to on numerous levels, even if I never happened to summon a horde of demons from digging a hole in my backyard.

An ambitious and good-hearted modern fairy tale that bluntly examined the universal horrors of growing up—both literally and figuratively—The Gate is an admirable genre debut from Takács, who had previously worked in Canadian television,
See full article at DailyDead »

Critical Distance: My Scary Movie Nightmares

Watching Walt Disney's Darby O'Gill and the Little People gave me nightmares. It wasn't so much the movie itself as it was the specific image of a banshee that appears at one point. The ghostly, flowing creature terrified me as a child because I had no easy way to comprehend what it was. I saw the 1959 movie during one of its theatrical re-releases, and later that night I sat up in bed when I saw a curtain billowing in my room. A light from the street shone through it, and from my angle it looked like that banshee. I thought I was going to die that night. Instead, I grew up distrustful of Walt Disney -- don't forget, he also killed off Bambi's mother...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Review: "Another Time, Another Place" (1958) Starring Lana Turner And Sean Connery; Warner Archive Release

By Lee Pfeiffer

If "Another Time, Another Place" is remembered at all, it's probably for all the wrong reasons. The 1958 film afforded Sean Connery his first major leading role, even though he gets killed off a little more than half-an-hour into the story. I'm not giving away a spoiler here...you can see it telegraphed from the early moments of the movie. Connery was given "Introducing" billing, a common fallacy on the part of studio marketing departments that implied an actor or actress was making their big screen debut. In reality, Connery had been kicking around the British film industry for a couple of years prior to making this movie, but only in supporting roles. The other bit of trivia for which this film is remembered is due to a tragic real-life scandal. While co-starring with Lana Turner, Connery began to spend a lot of his free time with her off set.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Tribeca 2014 Review: Ivan Kavanagh Dumps All of His Fears into The Canal

Take one part Lynchian weirdness, one part Polanski paranoia, toss in a hefty dose of J-Horror, mix 'em and cook 'em in a pot like gumbo, as the noted American poet Ice Cube once said, add just a smidgen of Darby O'Gill and the Little People for flavor, and you have Ivan Kavanagh's Gaelic scare-fest, The Canal. Okay, so that might not be entirely accurate, but you get the idea. And if you don't, the idea is: that's a whole lot of shit crammed in there. To be fair, it tastes much better than it has any right to, but it still doesn't congeal to form a cohesive whole. In addition to the tonal palette, there are a lot of story ideas running around, fighting...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

'Elf' at 10: Jon Favreau Reflects on Buddy's Magical Legacy

'Elf' at 10: Jon Favreau Reflects on Buddy's Magical Legacy
It's hard to remember now, but there was a time before Elf was everywhere – on frequent cable rotation, Broadway, and everyone's DVD shelf of classic Christmas movies. There was a time when Will Ferrell was not a surefire comedy movie star, and when Jon Favreau was the guy from Swingers who had directed some little indie films. But they set out to make a modern holiday classic, one that would rub shoulders with such perennial favorites as Miracle on 34th Street and TV's Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer – and they succeeded.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Streaming Family Movies: St. Patrick's Day Edition

It's St. Patrick's Day week, which means it's time to celebrate movies from the Emerald Isle. While there's no G-rated Irish film available for instant Netflix streaming, I highly recommend "Darby O'Gill and the Little People," a classic Disney leprechaun tale starring a very young Sean Connery (who's actually Scottish but still great to see). Here are great PG, PG-13, and -- if you have older teens -- R-for-language picks for this week. Erin go Bragh, movie lovers! PG Pick - Page to Screen: "The Secret of Kells" (2009, 75 minutes) Netflix Amazon Instant iTunes Kids Will Love: Even kids who like everything they see will realize how special this movie is, regardless of whether they understand the setting of a medieval Irish abbey. This is a hero's journey set in a supremely original setting. The orphaned nephew of the head Abbot, young Brendan is supposed to help build a wall to ward off invading Vikings.
See full article at Moviefone »

The Forgotten: Dashing Through the Snow

  • MUBI
A very quick holiday post.

Victor Sjöström's The Phantom Carriage is a fine festive movie, based as it is on the idea that whomsoever expires at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve/New Year's Day, will be doomed to drive the Death Coach for the following year, collecting the spirits of the dead and delivering them to their reward. Cheery stuff!

Sjöström serves up a wintry gloom and plays the lead role himself in grand style: I particularly relish a moment when he laughs in the face of a woman bent on his salvation, not in the silent movie manner of holding his sides and vibrating, but merely by baring his teeth. You can hear that dry chuckle!

In 1939, Julien Duvivier remade the film for sound, with a big budget and the best the French studios had to offer, which matched Hollywood's artifice icicle for icicle:

We track across this huge,
See full article at MUBI »

Before Bond: The Long Road To Bring 007 To The Big Screen

50 years ago today on October 5th, 1963, "Dr. No," a fairly low-budget, modest spy thriller starring a Scottish actor known for the Disney film "Darby O'Gill and the Little People," was released in the U.K. The film was an immediate success, taking £840,000 in its first two weeks, and ending up the fifth most successful film of the year in Britain. It continued to be a hit across the world, not least in the U.S., where it received the approval of John F. Kennedy and had seen the source novels by Ian Fleming become bestsellers. Ultimately, the film made nearly $60 million worldwide. That was, as you're probably aware by now, only the beginning. Over the past half-century, the James Bond franchise has stretched to 23 official films (plus 1967's "Casino Royale" and "Never Say Never Again," two unofficial ones made possible by rights complexities), and taken $5 billion worldwide, making it second only to "Harry.
See full article at The Playlist »

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