Germans kidnap an American major and try to convince him that World War II is over, so that they can get details about the Allied invasion of Europe out of him.

Director:

George Seaton

Writers:

George Seaton (screen play by), Roald Dahl (based on "Beware of the Dog" by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
James Garner ... Major Jefferson Pike
Eva Marie Saint ... Anna Hedler
Rod Taylor ... Major Walter Gerber
Werner Peters ... Otto Schack
John Banner ... Ernst
Russell Thorson ... General Allison
Alan Napier ... Colonel Peter MacLean
Oscar Beregi Jr. ... Lt. Colonel Ostermann (as Oscar Beregi)
Ed Gilbert ... Captain Abbott
Sig Ruman ... German Guard
Celia Lovsky ... Elsa
Karl Held Karl Held ... Corporal Kenter
Martin Kosleck ... Kraatz
Marjorie Bennett ... Charwoman
Henry Rowland ... German Soldier
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Storyline

In this psychological war-drama an Army Major is captured by the Germans during World War II. They attempt to brainwash him into believing the war is over and that he is safe in an Allied hospital, so that he will divulge Allied invasion plans. Written by Patrick Dominick <p-dominick@adfa.oz.au>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Wildest Spy Adventure A Man Ever Lived! See more »

Genres:

Thriller | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mission: Impossible: Operation Rogosh (1966) was inspired by this film. See more »

Goofs

The radio introduces the song "Mairzy Doats" as an "oldie," a term first applied to songs in the 1959 LP series "Oldies But Goodies", an anthology of 1950s rock 'n' roll hits that were no longer on the Pop charts. See more »

Quotes

Sgt. Ernst: [Taking to Pike and Anna] Oh, you think I'm not loyal to the Fuhrer? But I am. He's a great man.Whatever he tells me to do, I do. He sends messages to the home guard. He says
[speaking in Hitler's clipped diction]
Sgt. Ernst: ; 'if the enemy puts a foot on German soil - it is your duty to drive them out'. You are the enemy . I can not 'drive you out' - I have no car. So - I make you walk out
[heartily laughs]
Sgt. Ernst: Heil Hitler!
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Alternate Versions

Also available in a computer colorized version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Star Trek: Enterprise: Stratagem (2004) See more »

Soundtracks

March: News of the Day
(uncredited)
Music by John Rochetti
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User Reviews

 
Well-made, absorbing wartime thriller with an intelligent plot.
25 August 2005 | by barnabyrudgeSee all my reviews

George Seaton had already written and directed the very impressive The Counterfeit Traitor when he turned his attention to this absorbing and cleverly-plotted thriller. Once again the film is set during WWII and once again Seaton weaves an exciting story against the backcloth of that intriguing and terrifying period of history.

Major Jefferson Pike (James Garner) is an American intelligence officer who is kidnapped and drugged en route to Lisbon during the days approaching the D-Day Landings. Pike's original mission before his capture was to pass on misleading information to the Germans, intended to trick them into expecting the Allies to storm ashore at Calais rather than the actual intended target area of the Normandy beaches. When Pike awakens, he is unknowingly in a secret compound in Bavaria, and the D-Day attack is still 36 hours away from actually taking place. He is told by disguised Nazi spy, Major Walter Gerber (Rod Taylor), that the war is over and that he has been suffering from amnesiac lapses for the past six years. Gerber's plan is to convince Pike that the war ended years previously with Allied victory and that it is safe to reveal details about the D-Day Landings.... details which would, in fact, be very useful to the German forces in the hours approaching the top-secret Allied attack.

It is a very interesting plot, and is well-handled. Rod Taylor's performance as the slippery Nazi trickster is exceptionally good, while Garner handles his slightly dull role (as the hero with sensitive information which he is unsure about revealing) with efficiency. The crisp black and white photography - unusual for a film made in the Technicolour-obsessed '60s - adds to the film's verisimilitude and sense of period, giving it a documentary-like feel. While the proceedings are stretched out to a rather lengthy 115 minutes, the film doesn't become significantly tedious and manages to keep the viewer excited (even though we know, because of the real-life success of the D-Day invasion, that the audacious Nazi plot is doomed to fail). 36 Hours is a solid, suspenseful yarn which should satisfy anyone who enjoys stories about wartime intrigue and audacious masquerades.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German | Portuguese | French

Release Date:

19 February 1965 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Thirty Six Hours See more »

Filming Locations:

Lisbon, Portugal See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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