A Patch of Blue (1965) - News Poster

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Sidney Poitier: A Living Legend Who Changed Hollywood

Sidney Poitier: A Living Legend Who Changed Hollywood
Sidney Poitier — who turns 94 on Feb. 20 — has received virtually every showbiz award possible: An Oscar, Grammy, Golden Globe, plus Life Achievement Awards from AFI, BAFTA, NAACP Image Awards, SAG and Kennedy Center Honors, to name a few. Though the kudos have been plentiful, they aren’t enough to convey the depth of his lasting impact on the entertainment industry, starting with being the first Black winner of best actor Oscar for the 1963 film “Lilies of the Field.”

The film industry’s lack of diversity is still an issue in the 21st century. But diversity was nearly non-existent when Poitier made his film debut in the 1950 “No Way Out.” There had been other Black actors in lead film roles, including James Edwards and Harry Belafonte, but they were extremely rare. And Poitier captured the public imagination like no one before him, with his soft but powerful voice and, crucially, his integrity.
See full article at Variety »

Behind the New York Sound of Netflix’s ‘The Forty-Year-Old Version’

Behind the New York Sound of Netflix’s ‘The Forty-Year-Old Version’
In The Forty-Year-Old Version, first-time filmmaker Radha Blank (who also wrote and stars in the movie) plays a fictionalized version of herself. A satire of “the theater world, middle age, New York, the racial and gendered expectations of commercial art,” as K. Austin Collins detailed in his review, the beautiful black-and-white film stands as a celebration of New York City’s diverse communities and cultures.

In a new featurette video, Blank shares more of her inspirations, plus candid conversations with contributing musicians — Khrysis, Mickey Factz, Babs Bunny, Courtney Bryan, Styles P
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Nun vs Monster! Give our '65 conversation a listen.

Nun vs Monster! Give our '65 conversation a listen.
by Nathaniel R

Who do you suppose was in second place for the Best Supporting Actress Oscar in 1965? We suspect Shelley Winters won in a landslide for her monster mom but perhaps Peggy Wood's Mother Superior was the runner up since The Sound of Music was so massive. What'cha think? We've noticed on the Smackdown posts that y'all don't really comment about the conversation of the podcast itself but just the write-up / blurb portion. We hope you're listening. The panelists (mwah) were super fun and lively. Here is the podcast again embedded below for your pleasure.

Podcast: 1 hour and 15 minutes

00.01 - Introductions: Spencer Garrett, Kayleigh Donaldson, Baby Clyde, Kevin Jacobsen, and Terence Johnson

06:30 - Othello , Laurence Olivier's "blackface", minstrelsy in that era, Dame Maggie Smith in her youth and today, and the documentary Tea with the Dames

27:00 - Shelley Winters in A Patch of Blue -- some people hate the performance,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Smackdown '65: Nuns, child abusers, and tragic pawns

Smackdown '65: Nuns, child abusers, and tragic pawns
The Supporting Actress Smackdown series picks an Oscar vintage and explores...

The Nominees  1965 was all about the Julies, Christie and Andrews, headlining the years biggest hits but both were located in the lead actress category. When some of the year's most lauded supporting actress turned up in films Oscar wasn't interested in they selected quite an odd list from which films they were looking at, still missing one very obvious great choice. Recent Oscar winner Shelley Winters (A Patch of Blue) and recent nominee Joyce Redman (Othello) were invited back and future Dame and Oscar darling Maggie Smith (Othello) was invited for the first time. TV regular Peggy Wood (The Sound of Music) and a longtime Hollywood screenwriter Ruth Gordon (Inside Daisy Clover), nabbing her first nomination in an acting category, were also chosen. The resulting shortlist of characters included a nun, a child abuser, two women doomed by hateful petty men,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Smackdown Reminder: One more day to vote...

Smackdown Reminder: One more day to vote...
A reminder that you have until Thursday October 8th (that's coming up so fast) to get your votes in before the next Smackdown. Send in your votes (1 to 5 hearts for each lady) by October 8th. Easy!

Ruth Gordon, the 'crazy' mom, Inside Daisy Clover Amazon

Joyce Redman, the help, Othello - YouTube

Maggie Smith, the long-suffering wife, Othello - YouTube

Shelley Winters, the 'monster' mom, A Patch of Blue- Amazon

Peggy Wood, the reverend mother, The Sound of Music - Disney+
See full article at FilmExperience »

1965: The Golden Globes' Alternate Choices

1965: The Golden Globes' Alternate Choices
Each month before the Supporting Actress Smackdown Nick Taylor selects performances for an alternate ballot...

Of the Golden Globes’ Supporting Actress nominees in 1965, three of their five were transplanted to Oscar’s lineup. Globe winner Ruth Gordon in Inside Daisy Clover, Joyce Redman in Othello, and Peggy Wood in The Sound of Music (who we all basically agree was not the best option from her movie) all made the cut, while Redman’s co-star Maggie Smith was imported from the Globes' Lead Actress-Drama category. Only Shelley Winters, who wound up winning the damn Oscar for A Patch of Blue, failed to show up anywhere at the Globes. The two Globe nominees left out to pasture come Oscar nomination morning were Nbr winner Joan Blondell in The Cincinnati Kid and never-winning Academy regular Thelma Ritter in Boeing Boeing. Both of the unlucky actresses co-starred in films that were blanked by the Academy completely.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Introducing the Smackdown Panel for '65

Introducing the Smackdown Panel for '65
Are you ready for the the penultimate episode of this super-sized Supporting Actress Smackdown season? Up next 1965. The Nominees Were: Ruth Gordon (Inside Daisy Clover),  Joyce Redman And Maggie Smith (Othello), Shelley Winters (A Patch of Blue) and Peggy Wood (The Sound of Music).  Once you've watched that quartet of films, send in your ballots with "1965" in the subject line and a 1 (poor) to 5 (perfection) rating for each of the five performances. You're the collective final vote. Let's meet your fellow panelists, shall we?

Please Welcome...   
See full article at FilmExperience »

Where to watch 1965 movies before the next Smackdown

Where to watch 1965 movies before the next Smackdown
Maggie Smith's first Oscar nominationAs we keep promising you, the Smackdowns are much more fun if you play along at home. Up next is 1965 and there are only four movies to watch (all of which received multiple Oscar nominations) to prepare for the discussion on October 9th.

Supporting Actress Nominees Of 1965

Ruth Gordon from Inside Daisy Clover (3 Oscar noms) - Amazon

• Maggie Smith and Joyce Redman from Othello (4 Oscar noms) - YouTube

Shelley Winters from A Patch of Blue (5 Oscar noms)- Amazon

Peggy Wood from The Sound of Music (10 Oscar noms) - Disney+

Once you're done watching those, send in your votes (1 to 5 hearts for each lady) by October 8th. Easy! You're then part of the Smackdown!

If you Really wanna dive into the cinema of 1965 before the event, here are key 1965 movies that are currently streaming for free.

Oscar Nominated 1965 Titles Currently Streaming...
See full article at FilmExperience »

August. It's a Wrap

August. It's a Wrap
The "Summer Movie Season Without...er... Movies" is officially over. Now we move on to Prestige Film Season... hopefully With Movies but you never know. The dog days of summer are over but here were a baker's dozen or so key posts from the month at Tfe in case you missed any of them.

Some Highlights

• French Exit Nathaniel suggests reading the book before the movie!

• When Tilda Swinton Went Mainstream - Sean dons the furcoat and angel wings

• The Australian New Wave - Glenn takes Criterion's journey down under

• The New Classics: Moonlight -Michael goes to the diner with Black & Kevin

A Patch of Blue - Nathaniel gasps at Shelley Winters (second) Oscar

• The Furniture: The Poseidon Adventure - Daniel boards the (sinking) ship

Scott Pilgrim vs The World - Nick for the 10th anniversary

• Revisiting Spotlight - Juan Carlos asks how the Best Picture has aged

Most
See full article at FilmExperience »

Shelley Winters @ 100: A Patch of Blue (1965)

Shelley Winters @ 100: A Patch of Blue (1965)
We're celebrating the centennial of Shelley Winters. Here's Nathaniel...

Int. Nathaniel's apartment. Two best friends are bored, realizing it's another "exciting" Covid summer night of what will we eat for dinner / watch on TV?. Nathaniel presents a few movie options (inevitably related to whatever Tfe projects are in development). His friend's choice surprises him, "I think I'm really in a Shelley Winters mood." Nathaniel wonders for a split-second what a 'Winters mood' is before realizing he already knows... and approves! Up goes the movie and within seconds they glance at each other. "Shelley is going hard!" Nathaniel proclaims, half-stunned. He really shouldn't be. Going hard is, after all, a Winters mood and specialty.

Still and all, performances that begin at the pitch the Oscar winner risks for her introductory scene in A Patch of Blue rarely have anywhere go to thereafter...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Shelley Winters @100: Lolita (1962)

Shelley Winters @100: Lolita (1962)
We're celebrating the centennial of Shelley Winters each night for a few more days. Here's Eric Blume...

Stanley Kubrick’s 1962 film adaptation of Lolita lands right in the middle of Shelley Winters’ two Oscar wins (The Diary of Anne Frank and A Patch of Blue). Her balls-out performance in the first hour of this movie contains some true humdinger acting. She comes to the table to play and win here.

Obviously, especially when viewed within the context of today’s sensibilities, Lolita is a problematic picture. That's especially true since Kubrick plays each scene with his sympathies clearly in line with our leading man, Humbert Humbert, and actively against Winters, who plays mom of young Lolita, and who falls in love with Hh...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Almost There: Sidney Poitier in "In the Heat of the Night"

Almost There: Sidney Poitier in
by Cláudio Alves

Last week, we took a look at the cast of A Raisin in the Sun for the Almost There pieces. Among that quartet of fabulous performances, Sidney Poitier's Walter Younger stood out as the most overwhelming one, so full of energy that the claustrophobic set seemed incapable of containing him. This week, we're again exploring the filmography of the first Black man to win the Best Actor Oscar, giving him a solo opportunity to shine. You could actually do an entire miniseries about the many times Poitier might have come close to an Oscar nomination and failed: A Raisin in the Sun, Edge of the City, Porgy and Bess, A Patch of Blue.

Today, however, we'll be looking at Poitier's 1967 Oscar bid, when the actor starred in three hits, two of which went on to be nominated for Best Picture. Of them, Norman Jewison's In the Heat of the Night
See full article at FilmExperience »

A Patch of Blue

Sidney Poitier’s films of the 1950s and ’60s almost always put a statement about race in the forefront, and even when the message was obvious, his work as ambassador across the race divide made a big difference. This sweet tale of a possible romance across social barriers came at a time when interracial pairing was still illegal in some states. Poitier is his sweet self, but the film was stolen by young Elizabeth Hartman, a major talent with a tragic life story.

A Patch of Blue

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1965 / B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 105 min. / Street Date June, 2019 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Sidney Poitier, Shelley Winters, Elizabeth Hartman, Wallace Ford, Ivan Dixon, Elisabeth Fraser, John Qualen.

Cinematography: Robert Burks

Film Editor: Rita Roland

Original Music: Jerry Goldsmith

From the novel Be Ready With Bells and Drums by Elizabeth Kata

Produced by Pandro S. Berman

Written and Directed by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Regina King (‘If Beale Street Could Talk’) becomes 83rd Best Supporting Actress winner, joining Allison Janney, Viola Davis, Anne Hathaway, and…

Regina King (‘If Beale Street Could Talk’) becomes 83rd Best Supporting Actress winner, joining Allison Janney, Viola Davis, Anne Hathaway, and…
Regina King just won the Oscar as Best Supporting Actress for her performance as a mother determined to help her pregnant daughter clear her boyfriend’s name in “If Beale Street Could Talk.” It was an especially sweet victory, considering the Golden Globe and Critics Choice winner overcame snubs at SAG and BAFTA on her way to the podium. She became the 83rd person in history to clinch that prize, beating out Amy Adams (“Vice”), Marina de Tavira (“Roma”), Emma Stone (“The Favourite”) and Rachel Weisz (“The Favourite”). Tour our photo gallery above of every Academy Award winner for Best Supporting Actress, from the most recent winner to the very first one.

SEE2019 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 91st Academy Awards

The supporting categories were added in 1936 at the ninth Academy Awards, with Gale Sondergaard (“Anthony Adverse”) claiming the first victory in Best Supporting Actress. Initially,
See full article at Gold Derby »

10 Essential Sidney Poitier Movies, From ‘Blackboard Jungle’ to ‘To Sir, With Love’ (Photos)

10 Essential Sidney Poitier Movies, From ‘Blackboard Jungle’ to ‘To Sir, With Love’ (Photos)
“No Way Outâ€. (1950)

In his big-screen debut, Sidney Poitier makes a memorable impression as a pioneering African American physician who runs afoul of a racist thug (Richard Widmark) whose brother died in his care.

“Blackboard Jungleâ€. (1955)Â

In this melodrama, the first Hollywood feature to include rock songs, Glenn Ford plays a new teacher at a troubled inner-city school where Poitier is music-loving rebel.

“The Defiant Onesâ€. (1958)

Poitier starred opposite Tony Curtis in Stanley Kramer’s Oscar-winning drama about two escaped convicts who — since they are still chained together — reluctantly agree to cooperate despite their differences.

“A Raisin in the Sunâ€. (1961)

Reunited with much of the cast of the 1960 Broadway production of Lorraine Hansberry’s play, Poitier plays the ambitious young Chicago man squabbling with his family over how best to spend their late father’s insurance money.

“Lilies of the Fieldâ€. (1963)

Poitier plays a former G.I. who agrees to
See full article at The Wrap »

Sidney Poitier movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘In the Heat of the Night,’ ‘Lilies of the Field’

  • Gold Derby
Sidney Poitier movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘In the Heat of the Night,’ ‘Lilies of the Field’
Sidney Poitier celebrates his 92nd birthday on February 20, 2019. The Oscar-winning star broke down barriers for actors of color, becoming a Hollywood leading man at a time before black Americans were even granted full civil rights. He also opened doors for black directors after stepping behind the camera for nine features. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1927, Poitier made his big screen debut in “No Way Out” (1950), playing a doctor treating a racist white bigot (Richard Widmark). Just eight years later he was competing at the Oscars as Best Actor for “The Defiant Ones” (1958), which centers on two runaway fugitives chained together — one black, the other white (Tony Curtis). His bid made him the first black male performer to contend in an acting category at the Academy.

SEEOscar Best Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sidney Poitier movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Sidney Poitier movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best
Sidney Poitier celebrates his 92nd birthday on February 20, 2019. The Oscar-winning star broke down barriers for actors of color, becoming a Hollywood leading man at a time before black Americans were even granted full civil rights. He also opened doors for black directors after stepping behind the camera for nine features. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1927, Poitier made his big screen debut in “No Way Out” (1950), playing a doctor treating a racist white bigot (Richard Widmark). Just eight years later he was competing at the Oscars as Best Actor for “The Defiant Ones” (1958), which centers on two runaway fugitives chained together — one black, the other white (Tony Curtis). His bid made him the first black male performer to contend in an acting category at the Academy.

He would soon be joining the winner’s
See full article at Gold Derby »

Rachel Weisz (‘The Favourite’) may become only the 3rd to win Best Supporting Actress Oscar twice

Rachel Weisz (‘The Favourite’) may become only the 3rd to win Best Supporting Actress Oscar twice
It has been 13 years since Rachel Weisz was nominated for and won Best Supporting Actress at the Oscars for playing a doomed activist in “The Constant Gardener” (2005). She hasn’t been up for an Oscar since then, but she’s on the right track for a return bid this year for her role in “The Favourite.” And it’s looking more and more like the door is open for her to win, which would make her only the third woman to win Best Supporting Actress twice, and the first to do so undefeated.

The first woman to double up in this category was Shelley Winters, who prevailed for “The Diary of Anne Frank” (1959) and “A Patch of Blue” (1965). Before those victories she had lost in the leading category for “A Place in the Sun” (1951), and afterwards she earned one last bid for “The Poseidon Adventure” (1972).

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See full article at Gold Derby »

In honor of our national day of eating, here are eight actors who gobbled their way to Oscar recognition

In honor of our national day of eating, here are eight actors who gobbled their way to Oscar recognition
Turkey Day is upon us, our country’s annual holiday that brings families together and forces them to fill their mouths with stuffing and yams so they can’t discuss politics. But imagine if you got paid to gorge on your favorite goodies and then found yourself in the running for a coveted prize because of it. Then you won said coveted prize for doing what comes all too naturally for most of us – packing on the pounds.

As Oscar mavens know all too well, sacrificing a trim physique for a role of a lifetime is a regular ritual for movie stars seeking awards glory. It thrills me that two presumed lead actor candidates this year have fully engaged this tradition. Viggo Mortensen packed on 45 pounds to play Italian bouncer and chauffeur Tony Lip, who does like his food, in “Green Book,” which opens wider this week. He is joined by Christian Bale,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Horror Highlights: The Omen Limited Edition Vinyl Score, Mondo’s Preacher Statues, Images from Elves

Jerry Goldsmith's impeccable composing for Richard Donner's The Omen (1976) will be released as a limited edition (only 666 available) white vinyl courtesy of Varèse Sarabande. Also in today's Highlights: a look at Mondo's new Preacher statues and images from the new holiday horror film Elves.

The Omen Limited Edition Score on Vinyl: Press Release: – Varèse Sarabande will release a limited edition (666 units) demonic white vinyl version of The Omen – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack on June 25, 2018, available exclusively on VareseSarabande.com. Each copy of this completely remastered LP release will be hand numbered. The album features Jerry Goldsmith’s original score composed for Richard Donner’s 1976 horror masterpiece.

In The Omen, American diplomat Robert (Gregory Peck) adopts Damien (Harvey Stephens) when his wife, Katherine (Lee Remick), delivers a stillborn child. After Damien's first nanny hangs herself, Father Brennan (Patrick Troughton) warns Robert that Damien will kill Katherine's unborn child. Shortly thereafter,
See full article at DailyDead »
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