James Bond heads to the Bahamas to recover two nuclear warheads stolen by S.P.E.C.T.R.E. Agent Emilio Largo in an international extortion scheme.

Director:

Terence Young

Writers:

Richard Maibaum (screenplay by), John Hopkins (screenplay by) | 4 more credits »
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3,478 ( 616)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Sean Connery ... James Bond
Claudine Auger ... Domino
Adolfo Celi ... Largo
Luciana Paluzzi ... Fiona
Rik Van Nutter ... Felix Leiter
Guy Doleman ... Count Lippe
Molly Peters ... Patricia
Martine Beswick ... Paula
Bernard Lee ... 'M'
Desmond Llewelyn ... 'Q'
Lois Maxwell ... Moneypenny
Roland Culver ... Foreign Secretary
Earl Cameron ... Pinder
Paul Stassino ... Palazzi
Rose Alba Rose Alba ... Madame Boitier
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Storyline

James Bond continues on his fourth mission, with his aim to recover 2 stolen warheads. They've been taken by the SPECTRE organisation, and the world's held hostage as Bond heads to Nassau, Bahamas. Here, he meets Domino and is forced into a thrilling confrontation with SPECTRE agent Emil Largo on-board his boat, the Disco Volante. Written by simon_hrdng

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Look Up! Look Down! Look Out! Here Comes The Biggest Bond Of All! ["Look" is formed from the 007 logo] See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

For the scene where Count Lippe's car explodes, stuntman Bob Simmons ignited wads of gas-soaked felt via a dashboard switch on cue. Director Terence Young, amidst fears over Simmons' safety, filmed the car's crash and subsequent explosion although the stuntman seemed to have vanished. Young was relieved to have Simmons re-emerge behind him, having been lucky to escape with his life. See more »

Goofs

Bouvar loses one high-heeled shoe during the fight with Bond. In subsequent shots, he is wearing both shoes again with no opportunity to have replaced it on his foot. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Madame LaPorte: The coffin - it has your initials: J.B.
Bond: At the moment, rather him than me.
Madame LaPorte: At least you've been saved the effort of removing him. Colonel Bouvar passed away in his sleep, so they tell me.
Bond: Mm...
Madame LaPorte: You sound disappointed you did not kill him yourself.
Bond: I am. Jacques Bouvar murdered two of my colleagues.
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Alternate Versions

According to the Special Edition DVD version of "Thunderball", there are a few versions of the film out there. In different versions, Bond says a different line when he escapes from Largo's shark pool. Some versions also feature a comment that Felix makes when he and Bond see a manta-ray from the helicopter. It's not in the DVD. There are also alternate takes of a scene with Largo on his boat in different versions. Many of the versions released on VHS did not feature the original score for the underwater battle at the climax. [In fact ALL the above differences - plus the use of the instrumental Thunderball theme during the closing credits - appear in the 1992 MGM/UA UK VHS release. This suggests that rather than several different versions, there are 2 alternative cuts]. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Jane Bond Meets Thunderballs (1986) See more »

Soundtracks

Thunderball
Music by John Barry
Lyrics by Don Black
Performed by Tom Jones
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User Reviews

 
Budget Bloated Bond still holds some merit
27 October 2007 | by pyrocitorSee all my reviews

After the legendary success of Goldfinger , expectations were understandably astronomical for the next Bond installment, with 007 producers determined to consistently push the envelope, delivering a "bigger and better Bond" than ever before. Unfortunately, this determination proved to be both the strength and weakness of Thunderball, the resulting sequel. On the whole, the film is by no means a failure, but the producers' determination to cash in on elements which made Goldfinger such a success led to overkill excesses which sink Thunderball's overall quality.

The plot is even more outlandish than Goldfinger's radiation of the fort Knox gold reserve, pushing the threat to a more global context with the destruction of major world cities by atomic weapons. As well as being a particularly poignant plot device at the time, in the midst of the Cold War, the gist of Thunderball may seem quite familiar to those who frequent more modern political action thrillers, such as The Sum of All Fears. Despite the larger than life premise, Thunderball remains far more grounded in reality than several later Bond exploits (including You Only Live Twice and Moonraker) which tended to drift into being overly silly and ludicrous. Thunderball still takes itself relatively seriously, with several surprisingly dark moments, which help counterbalance the slightly comical yet still thrilling sight of of seeing Connery in a jet pack, and dramatically aid the overall quality of the film.

However, Thunderball's significantly larger budget is mostly misused through underwater photography sequences, which, although interesting to look at (and were likely moreso back in the 1960s, where such a sight was very seldom visible to the public eye) for the most part fail to further the plot in any way, and drag on excruciatingly long. However, the film does boast some strong cinematography (and some stunning locations), the action sequences (including a tense chase sequence through a Mardi Gras parade) are solid, and an unreasonably catchy Tom Jones title track surprisingly helps not hinders the film.

Unfortunately, for however many of the film's previous strengths, the film descends into utter chaos during the film's final quarter with a painfully repetitive and indecipherable underwater battle (it is increasingly difficult to tell which underwater army is which, who is winning, or why it should even retain our interest) a boat chase flaunting special effects which have dated decidedly unfavourably, and laughably inexplicable character motivations seemingly thrown in to finally tie up the increasingly unravelling mess. It is a disappointment indeed to see what started out with such promise sink into such a banal conclusion.

The character of Bond himself is surprisingly reduced to far less screen time than is usual for a 007 film, which is unfortunate, as Connery gives arguably one of his strongest performances as Bond, oozing self assurance and panache, yet an unprecedented darkness amidst the one liners ("I think he got the point" being the most classic). This time around Bond not only gets hurt, but is not afraid to hurt, unflinchingly bestowing surprisingly vicious physical punishment against his adversaries

The supporting cast proves to be a very hit and miss affair. While former model Claudine Augere certainly looks the part of a sixties Bond girl, but unfortunately for the most part retains the static lack of emoting also associated with them. Adolfo Celi's eye-patched frown makes a visually iconic Bond villain, and is suitably menacing, but as the film progresses, he loses his threat element more and more, eventually degrading to a flimsy carbon copy of an adversary by the final act. Luciana Paluzzi steals the show from all but Connery, making one of the most chilling Bond femme fatale figures in the franchise. Paluzzi, despite the potential to coast by on her sensual looks, refuses to play the part on autopilot, and exudes laudable charisma and threat throughout. The unfortunately named Rik Van Nutter makes the most generic and forgettable CIA agent Felix Leiter of the Bond series, but Bernard Lee and Desmond Llewelyn are on top form as the ever endearing M and Q.

As overlong and let down by some unfortunate overuse of budget and dated special effects as the film may be, Thunderball is nonetheless a noteworthy and suitably engaging early Bond effort. Connery himself, in one of his most charismatic renditions of the role is enough to merit watching, and the film for the most part runs along at a brisk enough pace to retain audience interest. While the film is less likely to enthrall those who are not already Bond purists, fans of the character or series should easily be able to extract moments of enjoyment from Thunderball.

-6/10


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

MGM [United States]

Country:

UK

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

22 December 1965 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Thunderball See more »

Filming Locations:

Atlantis Hotel, Bahamas See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$63,595,658

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$63,595,701
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Eon Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)| 6-Track Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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