The story of the marriage of England's King Arthur to Guinevere. The plot of illegitimate Mordred to gain the throne and Guinevere's growing attachment to Sir Lancelot, threaten to topple Arthur and destroy his "round table" of knights.

Director:

Joshua Logan

Writers:

Alan Jay Lerner (based on the play "Camelot" book by), T.H. White (novel) | 1 more credit »
Won 3 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Richard Harris ... King Arthur
Vanessa Redgrave ... Guenevere
Franco Nero ... Lancelot Du Lac
David Hemmings ... Mordred
Lionel Jeffries ... King Pellinore
Laurence Naismith ... Merlyn
Pierre Olaf Pierre Olaf ... Dap
Estelle Winwood ... Lady Clarinda
Gary Marshal ... Sir Lionel
Anthony Rogers Anthony Rogers ... Sir Dinadan
Peter Bromilow ... Sir Sagramore
Sue Casey Sue Casey ... Lady Sybil
Gary Marsh ... Tom of Warwick
Nicolas Beauvy Nicolas Beauvy ... King Arthur as a Boy
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Storyline

The story of the marriage of England's King Arthur to Guinevere is played out amid the pagentry of Camelot. The plot of illegitimate Modred to gain the throne and Guinevere's growing attachment to Sir Lancelot, whom she at first abhors, threaten to topple Arthur and destroy his "round table" of knights who would use their might for right. Written by Ron Kerrigan <mvg@whidbey.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Direct from its reserved seat engagement See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Reg Whitehead was seriously considered For Sir Paul. See more »

Goofs

When Mordred first meets Arthur and Pellinore, Mordred's hat changes from being on his head to in his hands and then back on his head between shots. As Modred is speaking to Arthur about the thrones, Arthur is seen with his fingers on his forehead, in the next shot his hand is in a fist and on his mouth. Later in the scene, Arthur is squatting on his throne in one shot and then in the next shot one of his feet is down on the ground. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
A Knight: The rules of battle are not for Lancelot Du Lac, Your Majesty! Let us attack now while they sleep!
King Arthur: [firmly] We will attack when I give the command - at dawn.
[the knight leaves, and Arthur begins to talk to himself]
King Arthur: Oh, Merlyn, Merlyn, why is Ginny in that castle, behind walls I cannot enter? How did I blunder into this agonizing absurdity? Where did I stumble? How did I go wrong? Should I not have loved her?
[sighs]
King Arthur: Then I should not have been born! Oh, Merlyn, I haven't got much time. ...
[...]
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Alternate Versions

The version shown on cable channels in the 1980's featured the Warner Bros-Seven Arts "W" logo in the opening credits instead of saying "Warner Bros-Seven Arts presents". All other releases of the film (including the original roadshow run, the film's general release, re-releases, the 30th anniversary VHS, and the DVD) are without the logo, and simply say "Warner Bros-Seven Arts presents". But oddly enough, the cover of the film soundtrack album says "Warner Bros. Pictures Presents", and shows the famous Warner Bros. shield. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Dirty Dancing (1987) See more »

Soundtracks

I Loved You Once In Silence
(uncredited)
Lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner
Music by Frederick Loewe
Sung by Vanessa Redgrave and Gene Merlino (dubbing Franco Nero)
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User Reviews

 
Beautiful costumes are not enough
13 May 2013 | by jjnxn-1See all my reviews

Beautiful music and strong performances from Richard Harris and Vanessa Redgrave, however they are not singers and it hurts the picture mightily, leaving you wondering how much better it could have been with Richard Burton, Robert Goulet and especially Julie Andrews. True Burton wasn't a singer either using the talk singing method that Rex Harrison employed on My Fair Lady so Harris' replacement isn't as glaring as Redgrave/Andrews or Nero/Goulet. Where the picture really runs into problems through is the lumbering pace set by director Logan. A fine director of drama but with no skill at setting the right tone for a musical although that didn't stop the studios from handing him several throughout the years ending with the disaster of Paint Your Wagon. Some of the costumes are truly amazing and justly famous but this can be a trial to sit through.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 October 1967 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Camelot See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$13,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (35 mm prints)| 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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