6.0/10
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164 user 68 critic

Valley of the Dolls (1967)

Trailer
3:22 | Trailer
Film version of Jacqueline Susann's best-selling novel chronicling the rise and fall of three young women in show business.

Director:

Mark Robson

Writers:

Jacqueline Susann (novel), Helen Deutsch (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Barbara Parkins ... Anne Welles
Patty Duke ... Neely O'Hara
Paul Burke ... Lyon Burke
Sharon Tate ... Jennifer North
Tony Scotti ... Tony Polar
Martin Milner ... Mel Anderson
Charles Drake ... Kevin Gillmore
Alexander Davion ... Ted Casablanca (as Alex Davion)
Lee Grant ... Miriam Polar
Naomi Stevens ... Miss Steinberg
Robert H. Harris ... Henry Bellamy
Jacqueline Susann ... First Reporter
Robert Viharo ... Director
Joey Bishop ... MC at Telethon
George Jessel ... MC Grammy Awards
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Storyline

Anne Welles, a bright, brash young New England college grad leaves her Peyton Place-ish small town and heads for Broadway, where she hopes to find an exciting job and sophisticated men. During her misadventures in Manhattan and, later, Hollywood, she shares experiences with two other young hopefuls: Jennifer North, a statuesque, Monroe-ish actress who wants to be accepted as a human being, but is regarded as a sex object by all the men she meets, and Neely O'Hara, a talented young actress who's accused of using devious means by a great older star (Helen Lawson) to reach the top, pulling an "All About Eve"-type deception in order to steal a good role away from her. Written by filmfactsman

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The motion picture that shows what America's all time #1 best seller first put into words! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Music | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic elements involving substance abuse, some sexual content, partial nudity and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

There are shots of the exterior of the Playhouse Theatre in New York. This venue was the home of the original Broadway production of "The Miracle Worker", in which Patty Duke, who plays Neely O'Hara, starred in "The Miracle Worker" from 1959-61. See more »

Goofs

When Anne goes to her room at the hotel she opens her window to let a soft breeze flow through the room and then goes to bed. However, there was snow on the ground in NYC and she would have been freezing with the cold air coming in. The next day she drives away from NYC while there is still several inches of snow on the ground. See more »

Quotes

Neely O'Hara: [drunk in a bar] Who's stoned? I am merely traveling incognito.
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Connections

Spoofed in Discworld II: Mortality Bytes! (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

Come Live With Me
Written by André Previn
Lyrics by Dory Previn
Performed by Tony Scotti
See more »

User Reviews

"My beautiful little dolls. Just one...and one more."
5 May 2001 | by Vince-5See all my reviews

The film adaptation of Valley of the Dolls is stupid, empty, overly melodramatic...and a lot of fun!

Jacqueline Susann's 1966 novel is my all-time favorite, and her gritty, glossy pulp material was severely diluted for the big screen. That is the main problem. Too many punches are pulled, the characters are sweetened up, and a completely ridiculous happy ending (which Jackie hated) is substituted for the book's bleak, satisfying conclusion. Mark Robson's film has none of the spirit of its basis.

With that out of the way, the movie is very enjoyable for what it is: An unintentional laugh riot. The dialogue is hilarious and eminently quotable--"Boobies, boobies, boobies! Nothin' but boobies! Who needs 'em? I never had any! Didn't hurt me none!" Most of the supposedly "dramatic" and "touching" scenes are a scream. Patty Duke is priceless as the speech-slurring, tantrum-throwing, self-destructive Neely O'Hara. Watch her flailing around during the "It's Impossible" number; notice the embarrassing position of her beads. Barbara Parkins seems to have taken one Seconal too many before shooting, as she appears to be completely anesthetized. Susan Hayward gets to bellow a lot, fight with Duke, and get her wig thrown into a toilet in the most famous scene. The only one who comes off really well is Sharon Tate, a talent who never got the attention she deserved in life. Hers are the only genuinely affecting moments in the film, especially her final scene.

The candy-colored photography is good, beautifully capturing the glossy red capsules taken at every turn. The hair and fashions are glamorous--and so is the hairspray can! Dionne Warwick sings the beautiful theme, and the rest of the songs are enjoyably silly. I have the soundtrack LP--TWO copies! In conclusion, the ultimate camp classic! I'm off to take another doll now....


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

18 January 1968 (Netherlands) See more »

Also Known As:

Valley of the Dolls See more »

Filming Locations:

Mount Kisco, New York, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$5,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Red Lion See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.40 : 1
See full technical specs »

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