6.6/10
5,546
131 user 48 critic

Head (1968)

Trailer
1:02 | Trailer
The Monkees are tossed about in a psychedelic, surrealist, plotless, circular bit of fun fluff.

Director:

Bob Rafelson
Reviews

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Peter Tork ... Peter
Davy Jones ... Davy (as David Jones)
Micky Dolenz ... Micky
Michael Nesmith ... Mike
Victor Mature ... The Big Victor
Annette Funicello ... Minnie
Timothy Carey ... Lord High 'n Low
Logan Ramsey ... Off. Faye Lapid
Abraham Sofaer ... Swami
Vito Scotti ... I. Vitteloni
Charles Macaulay Charles Macaulay ... Inspector Shrink
T.C. Jones T.C. Jones ... Mr. and Mrs. Ace
Charles Irving Charles Irving ... Mayor Feedback
William Bagdad ... Black Sheik
Percy Helton ... Heraldic Messenger
Learn more

More Like This 

Drive, He Said I (1971)
Comedy | Drama | Sport
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

Hector is a star basketball player for the College basketball team he plays for, the Leopards. His girlfriend, Olive, doesn't know whether to stay with him or leave him. And his friend, ... See full summary »

Director: Jack Nicholson
Stars: William Tepper, Karen Black, Michael Margotta
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

A daydreamer convinces his radio personality brother to help fund one of his get-rich-quick schemes.

Director: Bob Rafelson
Stars: Jack Nicholson, Bruce Dern, Ellen Burstyn
The Monkees (1966–1968)
Comedy | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

The misadventures of a struggling rock band.

Stars: Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

A dropout from upper-class America picks up work along the way on oil rigs when his life isn't spent in a squalid succession of bars, motels, and other points of interest.

Director: Bob Rafelson
Stars: Jack Nicholson, Karen Black, Billy Green Bush
A Safe Place (1971)
Certificate: GP Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.2/10 X  

A strange young woman lives in a fantasy world where she can never grow up.

Director: Henry Jaglom
Stars: Tuesday Weld, Orson Welles, Jack Nicholson
Psych-Out (1968)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6/10 X  

A deaf runaway arrives in San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury hippie district looking for her missing brother.

Director: Richard Rush
Stars: Susan Strasberg, Dean Stockwell, Jack Nicholson
Adventure
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

Stolen diamonds spark a deadly drama involving a group of strangers in the Philippine jungle.

Director: Monte Hellman
Stars: Dewey Martin, Fay Spain, Jack Nicholson
The Trip II (1967)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.1/10 X  

After his wife leaves him, a disillusioned director dives into the drug scene, trying anything his friend suggests.

Director: Roger Corman
Stars: Peter Fonda, Susan Strasberg, Bruce Dern
Biography | Drama | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

The story of the Pre-Fab Four and their fight to be taken seriously as musicians.

Director: Neill Fearnley
Stars: George Stanchev, L.B. Fisher, Jeff Geddis
Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

Three cowboys, mistaken for members of an outlaw gang, are relentlessly pursued by a posse.

Director: Monte Hellman
Stars: Jack Nicholson, Cameron Mitchell, Millie Perkins
Tommy (1975)
Drama | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A psychosomatically deaf, dumb and blind boy becomes a master pinball player and, subsequently, the figurehead of a cult.

Director: Ken Russell
Stars: Roger Daltrey, Ann-Margret, Oliver Reed
Hey, Hey, It's the Monkees (TV Movie 1997)
Comedy | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

This hour-long special that aired on ABC finds Davy, Micky, Peter, and Mike loking back on the old days (with a medley of their hits) and promoting their 1996 CD "Justus" with 3 music ... See full summary »

Director: Michael Nesmith
Stars: Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith
Edit

Storyline

Running in from seemingly nowhere, Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith & Peter Tork - better known collectively as The Monkees - disrupt a bridge opening ceremony. From where and why did they come to disrupt the proceedings? They were filming a series of vignettes in several different genres, including a wild west sequence, a desert war sequence, a Confederate war sequence, and a science fiction sequence. They disagree with much of what is happening around them, and try to figure out how to escape the oppression they feel - symbolized by a big black box in which they are seemingly imprisoned - by the forces around. That oppression is often shown in the form of "The Big Victor Mature". Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

What is HEAD all about? Only John Brockman's shrink knows for sure!


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

John Brockman, whose head was used for the infamous ad campaign upon the film's 1968 release, can be seen in the movie exactly seventy-eight minutes in, in much the same pose. See more »

Goofs

When Micky jumps from the bridge at the start of the film, the replacement dummy enters the water head first. In the next shot, when we see the real Micky entering the water as seen from below, he enters feet first. See more »

Quotes

Mrs Ace: Well, if it isn't God's gift to the eight-year-olds.
See more »

Crazy Credits

These names were seen in reverse during the end credits: Srebmahc Yrret Oreh Snrub Ekim Gnihton Drapehs Rehtse Rehtom Iksotsleh Enitsirk Dneirf Lrig Namffoh Nhoj Dneifxes Eht Revaew Adnil Yraterces Revel Yelnah Mij Sidorf See more »

Alternate Versions

When the film was previewed in August 1968, its original cut ran about 110 mins. It was trimmed down to 86 mins. for the premiere. See more »

Connections

Featured in Angry Internet Personality: Uncle Meat: The Movie (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Long Title: Do I Have to Do This All Over Again
Written by Peter Tork
Performed by The Monkees (uncredited)
See more »

User Reviews

 
Everything that The Beatles' Yellow Submarine should have been
25 June 2005 | by BrandtSponsellerSee all my reviews

This is one of those films where it is easy to see how some people wouldn't like it. My wife has never seen it, and when I just rewatched it last night, I waited until after she went to bed. She might have been amused by a couple small snippets, but I know she would have had enough within ten minutes.

Head has nothing like a conventional story. The film is firmly mired in the psychedelic era. It could be seen as filmic surrealism in a nutshell, or as something of a postmodern acid trip through film genres. If you're not a big fan of those things--psychedelia, surrealism, postmodernism and the "acid trip aesthetic" (assuming there's a difference between them), you should probably stay away from this film. On the other hand if you are a fan of that stuff, you need to run out and buy Head now if you haven't already.

Oddly, the film has never received much respect. That probably has a lot to do with preconceptions. After all, it does star The Monkees--Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork--and The Monkees were a musical group of actors put together by producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider to be a kid-friendly, bubble-gummy Beatles for a television series. In their era, they had as much respect as, say, Menudo, New Kids on the Block, The Spice Girls, and so on. As a fellow IMDb reviewer rightly notes--"Perhaps people in 1968, thinking of the Monkees as a silly factory-made pop band rip-off of the Beatles, refused to see (Head)".

The Monkees and Head have never been quite able to shed that negative public perception. It's a shame, because there was a lot of talent, both musically and otherwise, in The Monkees. It's probably odder that Rafelson, who directs here and co-produces with Schneider, and Jack Nicholson (yes, _that_ Jack Nicholson), who wrote the script and also co-produces, decided to take The Monkees in this unusual direction. It's as if New Kids on the Block suddenly put out an album equivalent to Pink Floyd's Ummagumma (1969) or Atom Heart Mother (1970). In fact, the songs in Head, written by The Monkees and frequent collaborators such as Carole King and Harry Nilsson, have a Floyd-like quality, somewhere between the Syd Barrett era and the immediate post-Barrett era. This is much more prominent than any Beatles similarity. Some people have complained about the music in the film, but to me, all the songs are gems. For that matter, some people dislike Barrett era (or other) Floyd, which is just as difficult for me to empathize with.

But what _is_ Head about? The basic gist is just that The Monkees are taking a trip through various film genres--there are war scenes, adventure scenes, horror scenes, comedy scenes, drama scenes, western scenes, sci-fi scenes, romance scenes, and on and on. Except, in the film's reality, this turns out to be happening primarily (if not exclusively) on a studio lot. At root, we're watching The Monkees shoot a film. Of course all of the scenes in the various genres have something surreal and self-referential about them, and they, and individual shots within a scene, tend to lead to one another using dream logic not dissimilar to the Monty Python television show. As a dream, Head tends to vacillate between a good dream and a nightmare, while often being one that would cause you to laugh in your sleep (something that I frequently do, by the way).

Technically, Rafelson uses a wide variety of techniques to realize the above. There are scenes with extensive negative images, there are a lot of very fast cuts (including a great sequence that features Davy Jones and Tony Basil dancing alternately in a white and a black room, wearing a combination of white and black reversed in each, that occasionally toggles back and forth as quickly as two frames at a time), there are a lot of bizarre segues, there is an animated cow mouth, there are odd editing devices, and so on. For my money, I wish this stuff wasn't just a relic of the psychedelic era. This is the kind of artistic approach I relish. It seemed like a good idea back then and I still think it's a good idea. I'd like to see films like The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou using (2004) using these types of extended techniques. Now that would make that film surreal.

Interpretationally, some folks who aren't so in tune with the acid trip aesthetic have complained that it's basically b.s. to offer meanings for something intended to not have any. I disagree with such a pessimistic/nihilistic view; Head was intended to have a lot of meaning(s), and it's not just films without conventional plots that have multiple interpretations. Nicholson, Rafelson and Schneider have a lot of interesting things to say about The Monkees--the film postmodernistically comments on their manufactured status; pop stardom--way before Pink Floyd, Head conflates pop stardom and violence, from images of war to images of fans cannibalistically dismantling their idols; and naïve U.S.-oriented ideas of international perceptions and respect--well-armed foreigners in a desert surrender to Micky Dolenz just because he's an American, then later they blow up a Coke machine (again in the desert) for him because he's thirsty and can't gain access. The film comments on many other topics--from big Industry to police, surveys, spectatorship (especially in relation to tragedies), and on and on. Head is full of ideas, appropriately enough, with intelligent, multifaceted things to say about them.

Head deserves to be considered a classic--it's basically shooting for the same vibe as The Beatles' Yellow Submarine. Both premiered in November of 1968, interestingly enough, and both were intended as something of a summation of the psychedelic aesthetic. Yellow Submarine wasn't quite successful. Head is everything Yellow Submarine should have been.


93 of 104 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 131 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian

Release Date:

20 November 1968 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Changes See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$750,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Raybert Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Black and White | Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed