On the Buses (1969) - News Poster

(1969–1973)

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Ronald Chesney obituary

Leading harmonica player who became half of a comedy writing duo that produced TV hits such as The Rag Trade and On the Buses

Ronald Chesney, who has died aged 97, was one half of a comedy duo known as “the two Ronnies” before Barker and Corbett launched themselves as a TV double act with that name. Chesney and Ronald Wolfe worked behind the cameras, scripting two of the most popular sitcoms of all time, The Rag Trade and On the Buses, both set in the workplace and with a bawdy humour not always appreciated by TV critics but lapped up by millions of viewers. Chesney also had the distinction of being Britain’s most famous harmonica player in the years after the second world war.

“Everybody out!” was the catchphrase from Fenner Fashions’ militant shop steward Paddy, played by Miriam Karlin, in The Rag Trade (1961-63). It caught the imagination
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Peter Capaldi up for On The Buses reboot with Steven Moffat

Kirsten Howard Aug 1, 2017

Outgoing Doctor Peter Capaldi is keen to revive the classic 1970s sitcom On The Buses, it's been reported by an er, tabloid...

When Peter Capaldi hands Jodie Whittaker the keys to the Tardis on Christmas Day, it'll be the end of an era for the 59-year-old Scottish actor, but he has some plans in mind for the future that could very well mean staying on UK screens, and bringing Doctor Who writer Steven Moffat with him.

With what we're sure was an entirely straight face, Capaldi told The Sun that he's interested in reviving the ITV sitcom On The Buses, which originally ran between 1969 and 1973. The role he's got his eye on? Cyril ‘Blakey’ Blake.

"I want them to do On The Buses again," he revealed. "I’m trying to encourage them to do it. I have got a Blakey in me.”

Meanwhile, having seen through both
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Weekend review – likable but ropey gangster-money comedy

In Jovian Wade, Dee Kartier and Percelle Ascott’s scampish feature debut, three London friends foolishly spend £100,000 of accidentally gotten gains

If Adam Deacon’s Anuvahood was the Carry On of Brit urban comedy, then perhaps The Weekend is the On the Buses: likable, freewheeling, a bit ropey. Jovian Wade, Dee Kartier and Percelle Ascott have already shown tag-team charisma on their Mandem on the Wall YouTube channel and E4’s Youngers, and they easily carry it over to their feature debut as a trio of London friends who accidentally lay their hands on £100,000 of gangster readies and foolishly decide to spend it. As well as scampishly running rings around the grim fatalism of Noel Clarke’s ’hood trilogy, The Weekend atypically makes Wade’s lead a nice middle-class boy. Directed by fellow debutant Sheridan De Myers, the caper takes too long to get going and is thinly sustained
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Benedict Wong interview: Marco Polo season 2

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As season 2 of Netflix's martial arts epic Marco Polo arrives on Netflix, we chatted to Kublai Khan himself, Benedict Wong...

In addition to playing the world-straddling leader Kublai Khan in Netflix's big, expensive period action series, Marco Polo, Benedict Wong has carved out a niche in quality UK sci-fi films. He followed Danny Boyle's Sunshine with Duncan Jones' Moon, worked twice with Ridley Scott in The Martian and Prometheus, and recently came aboard Alex Garland's next picture, Annihilation. Before that comes to cinemas, he'll be seen alongside the UK's other acting Benedict in Marvel's Doctor Strange.

Many, of course, will fondly remember Wong as Errol, the optimistic innocent to Sean Lock's cynical misanthropist Vince in cult BBC comedy series 15 Storeys High, or even for a one-time appearance in The It Crowd.

We chatted to him about playing the would-be CEO of the world in Marco Polo,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Bad Education Movie, teaching us a lesson

A dreadful tradition that dates back to On The Buses is enthusiastically updated

Every now and then I find myself in a pop-cultural blind spot. Confessions: I didn’t know there were Captain America movies until the trailer for the third one came out; I thought Jeffrey Dean Morgan was Robert Downey Jr well into the 2010s; and I still don’t know what an Owl Of Ga’Hoole is. But no major film in recent years has caught me quite as unawares as The Bad Education Movie, a Jack Whitehall-starring adaptation of a BBC3 sitcom I’d never heard of, made on a not-insignificant budget and released into cinemas this August.

I watched the film on DVD this week, ashamed at having become the kind of “casual viewer” I normally disdain – the sort who actively benefits from the avalanche of exposition that kicks off each and every big-screen
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Stephen Lewis obituary

Actor whose career was dominated by the role of Blakey in On the Buses

Stephen Lewis, who has died aged 88, spent much of his long career playing variations of the character of Inspector Cyril “Blakey” Blake that he created so memorably in the long-running ITV 1970s comedy series On the Buses, his face contorted in a rictus of impotent rage as he muttered “I ’ate you, Butler” or “I’ll get you for this, Butler” at the slipshod and uncaring driver Stan Butler, played by Reg Varney. However, he first came to prominence as a playwright with Joan Littlewood’s leftwing Theatre Workshop, in the East End of London.

After the success of Frank Norman’s award-winning Fings Ain’t What They Used T’Be, with music by Lionel Bart, which transferred from the Theatre Royal, Stratford, to the West End in 1960, Littlewood was looking for another vibrant slice of working-class London life.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

On the Buses actor Stephen Lewis dies

TV star best known for role as Inspector Cyril ‘Blakey’ Blake, and as ‘Smiler’ on Last of the Summer Wine, dies aged 88

The actor Stephen Lewis, best known for his role as Blakey in the sitcom On The Buses, has died at the age of 88.

Lewis died peacefully at 1.50am on Wednesday in the Cambridge nursing home, in Wanstead, east London.

Rip Stephen Lewis... So pleased we worked together on The Krays. My thoughts are with your family and friends! pic.twitter.com/x73HSPV5wu

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Stephen Lewis has died

Stephen Lewis has died at the age of 88. The 'On the Buses' actor - who played Inspector Cyril 'Blakey' Blake - passed away peacefully in the early hours of yesterday (12.08.15) morning at the Cambridge Nursing Home in east London, and was ''in high spirits'' until the end, his great-niece Rebecca Lewis has confirmed. She added: ''He was always singing and joking. We just want people to remember him.'''' Rebecca initially broke the news about her uncle - who was also known for playing Clem 'Smiler' Hemmingway in 'Last of the Summer Wine' and Harry Lambert in 'Oh, Doctor Beeching!' - on
See full article at Virgin Media - TV »

On the Buses and Last of the Summer Wine star Stephen Lewis dies, aged 88

On the Buses and Last of the Summer Wine star Stephen Lewis has died, aged 88.

His family has confirmed to multiple media outlets that Lewis passed away on Wednesday (August 12) at a nursing home in East London.

Lewis's niece Rebecca told the press that the actor remained in "high spirits" in his last days, adding: "He was always singing and joking."

Through more 50 years in front of the camera, Lewis was best known for portraying Cyril 'Blakey' Blake in the ITV comedy On the Buses and its three spinoff films.

Lewis would later become a regular presence on UK television on The Generation Game, Oh, Doctor Beeching! and more recently Last of the Summer Wine from the 1970s through to the 2000s.

The London-born actor was also an accomplished screenwriter, having penned the Barbara Windsor and Roy Kinnear-starring 1963 film Sparrers Can't Sing.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Movie Review – Shaun the Sheep Movie (2015)

Shaun the Sheep Movie, 2015

Written and directed by Mark Burton and Richard Starzak

Featuring the voice talents of Justin Fletcher, John Sparks and Omid Djalili

Synopsis:

When Shaun decides to take the day off and have some fun, he gets a little more action than he bargained for. A mix up with the Farmer, a caravan and a very steep hill lead them all to the Big City and it’s up to Shaun and the flock to return everyone safely to the green grass of home.

There are several words that can best describe Shaun the Sheep Movie, but “wonderfully British” seems to sum the whole thing up perfectly. As it has been proven time and time again, you cannot go wrong with Aardman – and Shaun the Sheep Movie, the first big screen outing for the Cbbc woolly hero, is further proof of that. Charming, hilarious and rich with joyful glee,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Big Brother: Who is going to be crowned the winner? - Final live blog

It's time! After over 70 days - with all sorts of drama, naughtiness and tears - it's time to crown our Big Brother 2014 winner. Who's it going to be? Ash, Ashleigh, Chris, Christopher, Helen and Pav have all made it to the last night, so one of them is about to get a whole lot richer... but first the others will have to become losers (sorry).

We're getting the snacks in and settling down to bring you all the action from the compound, so grab the Pringles, the tissues and your pitchforks and join us as we find out who has won the right to go down in Big Brother history as the show kicks off at 9pm on Channel 5...

22:40But that's it - finito. Big Brother 2014 is over... but we don't think it'll be the last we hear of it! The winner might be controversial, but it's been a good series,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

15 Best British Sitcoms Of All Time

BBC

Although David Brent will always choose highly unorthodox means when expressing himself, it is difficult to entirely disagree with the overall sentiment of his message. Yes, the sheer audacity of placing John Sessions on a higher pedestal than Albert Einstein is pretty ludicrous – but it is undeniable that comedy performers are given far less credit than they warrant.

The British comedy scene has delivered in producing decades of exceptionally high quality, well-written and original TV shows – with fantastic replay value. Sure, the UK also dispersed On the Buses on to our screens with no pre-warning about how feeble the sitcom’s attempt at comedy was actually going to be – but you’re not always going to pull a Christmas cracker and get the cool yo-yo, sometimes you will end up with that plastic whistle that doesn’t work properly. That is just the nature of life.

Overall, British comedy
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

50 brilliant movie opening credits sequences

From a range of eras and genres, here's Jenny and Alex's light-hearted pick of 50 great opening title sequences from the movies...

Odd List

We don’t go to the cinema much, because we hate people. We also don’t go because there’s always the risk of accidentally going to see the wrong film. It's not helped by the fact that there's no way of telling until it’s too late, because there are no bloody opening credits on lots of modern films. And by the time you do realise, you’ve eaten all your popcorn and you can’t be bothered to move.

The movies on this list won’t give you that problem. These opening credits are perfect scene setters for the movies that follow, so you won’t have to worry about awkward popcorn wasting moments. It's not a top 50, rather a selection of 50 interesting credits sequences,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Why Martin Clunes is the king of cuddly programming

He's no David Attenborough, but whether rescuing a lion called Mugie or saving Madagascan lemurs, Clunes manages to find the perfect balance between enthusiasm and obnoxiousness

It's weird to think that, back in the mid-1990s, Martin Clunes was effectively the distilled essence of lad. As Men Behaving Badly's Gary, he was beery and leery and perpetually teetering on the brink of staging a full-scale one-man On The Buses revival tour. But now? Now he couldn't be any more cuddly if you wrapped him up in a romper suit and shoved a dummy in his gob.

Slowly but surely, Clunes has transformed into ITV's Mr Animal. He's at it again on Friday, presenting Martin Clunes and a Lion Called Mugie, a gentle and heartfelt documentary that follows Clunes to Kenya, where he meets a number of rescued lions and chats to the conservationists who plan to release them into the wild.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Bula Quo! Movie Review, Trailer, Pictures & News

Wrinkly rockers Rick Parfitt and Francis Rossi - veteran frontmen for creaking boogie merchants Status Quo - witness a murderous game of Russian roulette while on tour in Fiji. Before you can say one-chord wonders, they're on the run from mobster Wilson (Jon Lovitz). Craig Fairbrass gamely weighs in as their manager as Parfitt and Rossi make a play to be the new Stan and Jack from 70s sitcom On The Buses.
See full article at Sky Movies »

12 British sitcom stars and their surprise movie appearances

Feature Simon Brew 28 Jun 2013 - 07:11

Ever watched a big movie, and stopped with a jolt when a star of a British sitcom pops up? Us too...

This feature is all the fault of the late Richard Marner. As the incompetent Colonel in 'Allo 'Allo, he built a performance that was indelible in our eyes. Thus, when he turned up in a big Hollywood thriller as the President of Russia, we unsuccessfully stifled a guffaw. A big guffaw.

And it got us thinking: what other times has a British sitcom star appeared out of the blue in a big movie, causing a sedentary double take from the comfort of our local Odeon? Glad you asked.

Two things. Firstly, this isn't designed to be a complete list, and also, we've covered films made after the actor or actress confirmed rose to prominence in a sitcom. Oh, and another thing: none of
See full article at Den of Geek »

Pat Ashton obituary

My mother Pat Ashton, who has died aged 82, was an actor for over four decades. Probably her most important TV role was that of Annie, wife of a burglar (Bob Hoskins) who comes out of prison to find that his old friend (John Thaw) has moved in, in Thick As Thieves (1974). When Yorkshire TV declined a second series, the writers Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais took the idea to the BBC, where it was developed into the much-loved series Porridge.

Pat was born and raised in Wood Green, north London. During her early years, the piano was the focus of entertainment at home, with her brother Richard playing all the popular songs of the day. Her grandmother had been a trapeze artist, performing in front of the tsar in Russia, and Pat quickly became fascinated with music hall, learned to tap-dance from an early age and went on to
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Pat Ashton obituary

My mother Pat Ashton, who has died aged 82, was an actor for over four decades. Probably her most important TV role was that of Annie, wife of a burglar (Bob Hoskins) who comes out of prison to find that his old friend (John Thaw) has moved in, in Thick As Thieves (1974). When Yorkshire TV declined a second series, the writers Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais took the idea to the BBC, where it was developed into the much-loved series Porridge.

Pat was born and raised in Wood Green, north London. During her early years, the piano was the focus of entertainment at home, with her brother Richard playing all the popular songs of the day. Her grandmother had been a trapeze artist, performing in front of the tsar in Russia, and Pat quickly became fascinated with music hall, learned to tap-dance from an early age and went on to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The best of Citv: highlights from the Old Skool Weekend

ITV's kids channel is serving up an 80s and 90s nostalgia fest this weekend. Here are our favourites

Saturday's full Citv line up | Sunday's full Citv line up

It's the most miserable time of the year. You're poorer than usual, fatter than usual and going outside is more or less the same as being sandblasted with frozen gravel. It's time to fall back on that comforting old standard: mindless nostalgia.

Which is fortunate, because the Citv channel is about to deliver an industrial dose of exactly that in the form of its Old Skool Weekend. To mark the 30th anniversary of Citv's first incarnation, the channel has decided to dedicate this entire weekend to classic programming from its vaults.

There'll be something for everyone. If you grew up in the 80s and 90s, you can reminisce about a more innocent age where television was mainly about some spoons walking around on a button.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Harry & Paul – Where Did It Go Wrong?

Last Sunday saw the broadcast of the sixth episode of Series Three of BBC2 sketch show Harry & Paul. Or the fourth if you count Ruddy Hell It’s Harry & Paul as its first series. And to be honest, I wouldn’t be surprised if the next episode – the final in the series – turns out to be the last overall.

Created by sketch show virtuosos Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse, Harry & Paul saw their return to sketch comedy with them mixing their intrinsic talent for class and character-based comedy with the absurdity of the modern world. The initial few series were never going to reach the level of their previous hit Harry Enfield’s Television Programme but it was still entertaining enough with reliably funny sketches such as a middle class family with a pet Geordie, and the Benefits, an aggressive antisocial family living on state handouts. It wasn’t astounding,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »
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