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Zabriskie Point (1970)

R | | Drama | March 1970 (Argentina)
At a time of chronic civil unrest in the USA at Zabriskie Point, in Death Valley, CA, two perfect strangers meet; a young revolutionary and an anthropology student who start an unrestrained romance, making love on the dusty terrain.

Writers:

Michelangelo Antonioni (story), Michelangelo Antonioni (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
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1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Mark Frechette ... Mark
Daria Halprin ... Daria
Paul Fix ... Cafe Owner
G.D. Spradlin ... Lee's Associate
Bill Garaway Bill Garaway ... Morty
Kathleen Cleaver ... Kathleen
Rod Taylor ... Lee Allen
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Storyline

An epic portrait of late Sixties America, as seen through the portrayal of two of its children: anthropology student Daria (who's helping a property developer build a village in the Los Angeles desert) and dropout Mark (who's wanted by the authorities for allegedly killing a policeman during a student riot)... Written by Michael Brooke <michael@everyman.demon.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

It's where a boy and a girl come together and blow their minds. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Harrison Ford fans know his scenes were cut from this film. However, in the jail scene, if you look closely you can see him standing against the back wall near the door. See more »

Goofs

Zabriskie Point, in Death Valley National Park (California, USA) is not actually the lowest-elevation point in the United States. That would be Badwater Basin, at a depth of 282 feet below sea level, which is also located in Death Valley National Park about 20 miles away. See more »

Quotes

Male Black Radical Student #1: [first spoken lines] That's the same old jive that's been runnin' now for the past 300 years. If you all so wise and heavy, why didn't you join the strike in the beginning? Nah, you just go back and tell 'em, "Sorry, this motherfucker is *closed* down! On strike, Jack. "
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Alternate Versions

MGM president Louis F. Polk was so worried about the controversy surrounding the film, particularly the threat of an X rating, that he invoked the studio's right to the final cut and ordered Antonioni to eliminate anything that might be potentially controversial. Thus, the riots, the love-ins, and numerous other scenes and fragments of scenes were removed, leaving only seventy minutes. The film was deemed unreleasable and written off as a loss but was saved when Polk was replaced by James T. Aubrey, who thought highly of the film and restored (nearly) all of the cut scenes. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Pervert's Guide to Ideology (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Dark Star
Written by Jerry Garcia (uncredited) and Robert Hunter (uncredited)
Performed by Grateful Dead
Courtesy Warner Bros Records
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User Reviews

 
A Rare Treat
19 August 2000 | by harry-76See all my reviews

About two hundred members of a Cleveland, Ohio USA film society, named Cinematheque, gathered on August 19, 2000 to view a pristine Cinemascope print of Michelangelo Antonioni's 1970 film, "Zabriskie Point." Cinematheque Director John Ewing, who does a superlative job of obtaining the finest prints for his series, shared with the audience beforehand that this print was specially flown over from Italy for this one showing only.

The audience was held spellbound as the film unfolded its artisty on the huge panoramic screen. Watching this superb print, shown the way Antonioni intended, made one aware that this is indeed a modern art work. It was all the more fitting that the series is housed in the Cleveland Insititue of Art in University Circle.

Antonioni's compositions are created for the Cinemascope landscape. His beautiful balancing of images, striking use of colors, sweeping choreographic movements, all are the work of a genuine artist, using the screen as his canvas.

At last the audience could understand "Zabriskie Point." As its narrative unfolded, it became obvious that this work is not about story per se, but rather an artist's impressionistic rendering of fleeting images of his subject. The setting of some of the more turbulent activities of the sixties provides only a dramatic motor for the artist's sweeping collage.

Antonioni is not bound by conventional narrative standards, and can pause at any point to creatively embroider an event with grandiose embellishments. The audience willingly went with the flow of his remarkable imagination, as his huge images on the massive canvas held one in rapt attention. While the audience may have been only tangentially involved in character relationships, it realized the theme here is human aleination, the director's recurring theme.

It was also realized that no print any smaller or of lesser quality than this original one in Cinemascope can do justice to this particular rendering. The audience was therefore all the more appreciative of viewing "Zabriskie Point" in its original, breathtaking format, and broke into thunderous applause at the end.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

March 1970 (Argentina) See more »

Also Known As:

Zabriskie Point See more »

Filming Locations:

Zzyzx, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$7,000,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$83,956
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (alternate)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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