7.5/10
18,411
130 user 146 critic

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974)

An American bar room pianist and his prostitute girlfriend go on a trip through the Mexican underworld to collect a bounty on the head of a dead gigolo.

Director:

Sam Peckinpah

Writers:

Gordon T. Dawson (screenplay) (as Gordon Dawson), Sam Peckinpah (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Warren Oates ... Bennie
Isela Vega ... Elita
Robert Webber ... Sappensly
Gig Young ... Quill
Helmut Dantine ... Max
Emilio Fernández ... El Jefe (as Emilio Fernandez)
Kris Kristofferson ... Biker
Chano Urueta Chano Urueta ... Manchot, the bartender
Donnie Fritts Donnie Fritts ... John (as Donny Fritts)
Jorge Russek ... Cueto
Chalo González ... Chalo (as Chalo Gonzalez)
Don Levy Don Levy ... Frank
Enrique Lucero ... Esteban
Janine Maldonado Janine Maldonado ... Theresa
Tamara Garina Tamara Garina ... Grandmother Moreno
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Storyline

In Mexico, the wealthy father of a pregnant young woman offers $1million for the head of the man who impregnated her. A pair of bounty hunters meet a local piano man in their search. The piano player does a little investigating, and finds out that his girlfriend knows of Garcia's death and where his body is. Thinking he can make easy money, they set off on this goal, but instead, the trip brings untold misery. Written by Tad Dibbern <DIBBERN_D@a1.mscf.upenn.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Who knows why it's worth one million dollars and 21 lives? See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to Garner Simmons's audio commentary, the burlap bag that Warren Oates carries in his car is filled with pieces of meat, simulating the presence of the head of Alfredo Garcia, which attracts the flies. See more »

Goofs

At the beginning, a Pan Am 707 takes off. It lands a few seconds later with a different livery/paint scheme. The red stripe along the fuselage had changed to blue, and color appears around the base of the tail fin. See more »

Quotes

Bennie: Come on, Al. We're going home.
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Crazy Credits

There are only three credits at the beginning of the film: The production credit, the two stars, and the story/screenplay. Everything else is at the end, and the film's title is the very last credit. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Bring Me the Head of the Machine Gun Woman (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Bad Blood Baby
by Sam Peckinpah
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User Reviews

 
One man and his quest for meaning turns into a Peckinpah classic.
4 March 2008 | by hitchcockthelegendSee all my reviews

El Jefe is outraged to find that his daughter has fallen pregnant to a man who has upped and gone, after learning the identity of the rascal (Alfredo Garcia), he offers one million dollars to anyone who can bring him the head of the Lothario running man. On the trail are hit men Quill & Sappensly, Bennie & his prostitute girlfriend Elita, and some other Mexican bandit types, all of them are on a collision course that will bring far more than they all bargained for.

This was the one film where director Sam Peckinpah felt he had the most control, the one where we apparently get his own cut and not some chopped up piece of work from interfering executives. Viewing it now many years after its release it stands up well as a testament to the work of a great director. On the surface it looks trashy, we have homosexual hit men, grave robbing, potential rape, murders abound, prostitution, lower than the low characters, in short the film is awash with Peckinpah traits. Yet it would be a disservice to even think this film isn't rich in thematic texture, for the journey that Bennie that our main protagonist takes is one of meaning. He is a loser, but we find him on this quest to find not only fortune, but respect and love. It's a bloody trail for sure, but it has much depth and no little Peckinpah humour to push the film to the bloody but triumphant finale. Warren Oates is rewarded by Peckinpah for years of sterling work for him by getting the lead role of Bennie, and he grasps it with both hands to turn in a wonderful performance that splits sadness and vibrancy with deft of ease.

Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia has a harsh quality about it, be it the violence, or be it the sadness of the characters, but what isn't in doubt to me is that it's harshness is cloaked in Peckinpah splendour. 9/10


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Details

Country:

Mexico | USA

Language:

English | Spanish | Latin

Release Date:

7 August 1974 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,500,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$18,698
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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