7.1/10
6,639
96 user 45 critic

Farewell, My Lovely (1975)

Trailer
2:29 | Trailer
Los Angeles private eye Philip Marlowe is hired by paroled convict Moose Malloy to find his girlfriend Velma, former seedy nightclub dancer.

Director:

Dick Richards

Writers:

David Zelag Goodman (screenplay), Raymond Chandler (novel)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Robert Mitchum ... Marlowe
Charlotte Rampling ... Mrs. Grayle / Velma
John Ireland ... Nulty
Sylvia Miles ... Mrs. Florian
Anthony Zerbe ... Brunette
Harry Dean Stanton ... Billy Rolfe
Jack O'Halloran ... Moose Malloy
Joe Spinell ... Nick
Sylvester Stallone ... Jonnie
Kate Murtagh ... Amthor
John O'Leary John O'Leary ... Marriott
Walter McGinn ... Tommy Ray
Burton Gilliam ... Cowboy
Jim Thompson Jim Thompson ... Mr. Grayle
Jimmy Archer Jimmy Archer ... Georgie (as Jimmie Archer)
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Storyline

Murder. Marlowe. Mitchum. No one is a saint in the City of Angels. The immortal Robert Mitchum stars as Raymond Chandler's legendary detective Philip Marlowe in the neo-noir mystery Farewell, My Lovely. The hard-boiled Marlowe's latest cases (one, a search for an ex-convict''s lost love, and the other, the murder of a client) take on an even more sinister turn when they begin to connect, leading the private eye deeper and deeper into the seamy underbelly of 1940s Los Angeles. As the stakes are raised and the body count swells, it looks like Marlowe might be next on the list to take the big sleep. Also featuring Charlotte Rampling, Sylvia Miles, Harry Dean Stanton, and Sylvester Stallone in an early role, Farewell, My Lovely is an unflinching take on Chandler's pulpy novel and a mystery film as powerful and complex as its leading man.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

I need another drink ... I need a lot of life insurance ... I need a vacation ... and all I've got is a coat, a hat, and a gun !


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Robert Mitchum's interpretation and characterization of Raymond Chandler's Phillip Marlowe detective character was much older and world-weary than the earlier cinematic incarnations of the Marlowe private eye. See more »

Goofs

When Marlowe heads to the newspaper stand; in his narration he says that Joe DiMaggio had just hit in 33 straight games. But the newspaper had the headline of Hitler invading Russia. This is historically incorrect. DiMaggio's 33rd straight game occurred on June 20, 1941, his 34th straight game occurred on June 21st. and his 35th straight game occurred on June 22nd. Germany invaded Russia on June 22 therefore DiMaggio had to at least hit in 34 or 35 straight games by then depending if the newspaper came out the same day of the invasion or the day after. See more »

Quotes

Philip Marlowe: Philip Marlowe
[voiceover, to himself, locked in a room, waking from hallucinations after being drugged by Frances Amthor]
Philip Marlowe: ... The room was full of smoke... The smoke hung straight up in the air in thin lines; straight up and down, like a curtain of small clear beads. It didn't dissolve; didn't float off; didn't move... It was a grey web woven by a thousand spiders... I wondered how they'd got them to work together... Okay, Marlowe, I said. You're a tough guy. Six feet of iron man; one hundred ...
[...]
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Connections

Version of Expose Me, Lovely (1976) See more »

Soundtracks

I've Heard That Song Before
Words and Music by Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn
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User Reviews

 
A Truly Gorgeous, Vivid, Stylish Color Noir...Don't Prejudge it on 1940s Noir Terms!
17 July 2009 | by secondtakeSee all my reviews

Farewell, My Lovely (1975)

A Truly Gorgeous, Vivid, Stylish Color Noir...Don't Prejudge it on 1940s Noir Terms!

This is a gorgeous surprise, a retreat forward, a 1940s drama not done in painful nostalgic pastel hues and soft edges, but in bold bright 1975 color and pitch dark shadow. You have to say the obvious and get it over with: yes, this is a modern "film noir." But it isn't a mere homage, nor a remake, nor a cheap imitation. Director Dick Richards, who has no other well known film to his credit, pulls a gem out of nowhere on this one. Just be sure to watch it for what it is, a dramatic period crime film, not for what you think it ought to be, a slavish remake of a classic noir. And he has the help of the perfect cinematographer for the subject, John A. Alonzo, who did both Chinatown (the year before) and eight years later, Scarface, both post-noir landmark crime films.

Of course, this version of Farewell, My Lovely is, strictly speaking, a remake, which is to say, it's the third movie based on Raymond Chandler's 1940 novel of the same name. And inevitably we are going to compare to the other great version, Dmytryk's 1944 true, early film noir (called Murder, My Sweet). I say other great version, because both are really fine films, and different enough to avoid copycatting. Farewell, My Lovely is actually the more original of the two, an irony after 31 years of influences. And in some ways it's better, mainly because it has Robert Mitchum very much in top form. He makes those beautifully concise and witty one liners seem real and fitting, as if people really did once talk like that. I wish they still did.

There are countless bit parts that pump up the stylishness of the movie, most memorably Sylvia Miles playing a hard-drinking has-been. And she and Mitchum have great chemistry, not as lovers, but as people from opposite sides of life who have a similar perspective on things, and they chat and resonate like old friends. (Compare this to the rougher, less involving scene in Murder, My Sweet.) Velma herself is none other than Charlotte Rampling, probably a hair miscast because Rampling has some kind of severity that the noirish femme fatales don't, as a stereotype, share. And this movie deals with stereotypes.

Mitchum above all. It's fascinating to see a movie that is meant to be fitting into a form well known enough to be able to both refer to (in style and plot) and to deviate from (so we can feel it's original intent). And to have Mitchum, with his decades of great, strong, roles, anchor it all makes for a sweet, almost poignant experience. A similar feeling might be had in the remake of Cape Fear, but for my money, this is the more interesting movie, whatever the limitations of the plot, and the big thug. Go ahead, compare the Dmytryk version to this Richards one. If you haven't seen either one, watch the more recent one first to give it a full chance. You might go away surprised.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

8 August 1975 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Farewell, My Lovely See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,500,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

EK, ITC Films See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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