7.6/10
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235 user 220 critic

Deep Red (1975)

Profondo rosso (original title)
Trailer
1:29 | Trailer
A jazz pianist and a wisecracking journalist are pulled into a complex web of mystery after the former witnesses the brutal murder of a psychic.

Director:

Dario Argento
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
David Hemmings ... Marcus Daly
Daria Nicolodi ... Gianna Brezzi
Gabriele Lavia ... Carlo Manganiello
Macha Méril ... Helga Ulmann
Eros Pagni Eros Pagni ... Supt. Calcabrini
Giuliana Calandra ... Amanda Righetti
Piero Mazzinghi Piero Mazzinghi ... Bardi
Glauco Mauri ... Prof. Giordani
Clara Calamai ... Marta Manganiello
Aldo Bonamano Aldo Bonamano ... Carlo's Father
Liana Del Balzo Liana Del Balzo ... Elvira
Vittorio Fanfoni Vittorio Fanfoni ... Cop Taking Notes
Dante Fioretti Dante Fioretti ... Police Photographer
Geraldine Hooper Geraldine Hooper ... Massimo Ricci
Jacopo Mariani ... Young Carlo (as Iacopo Mariani)
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Storyline

A psychic who can read minds picks up the thoughts of a murderer in the audience and soon becomes a victim. An English pianist gets involved in solving the murders, but finds many of his avenues of inquiry cut off by new murders, and he begins to wonder how the murderer can track his movements so closely. Written by Ed Sutton <esutton@mindspring.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

When was the last time you were REALLY SCARED!!!? PSYCHO? The EXORCIST? JAWS? Now there's DEEP RED. See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

After Marcus Daly has witnessed the murder, he and the drunk are seen discussing the murder with the large Statue of Po [Turin, Italy] in centre of shot. The statue is of a man, at the Turin Fountain, representing the river Po; the largest waterway in Italy. See more »

Goofs

The wires controlling the bird are visible when it flies into the knitting needle. See more »

Quotes

Gianna Brezzi: I think that a woman's gotta be independent so she can...
Marcus Daly: Oh, don't start with me about all that woman's stuff. It is a fundamental fact... men are different from women. Women are... weaker; well, they're gentler.
Gianna Brezzi: They're what? Weaker? Gentler?
[she howls in laughter - stops laughing, stands, unbuttons jacket, moves to the table, determinedly clearing it]
Marcus Daly: What on earth are you doing?
Gianna Brezzi: [sitting again and holding her arm up, wriggling her fingers] Come on, Tarzan. Why don't you try me?
Marcus Daly: What's that?
Gianna Brezzi: Arm ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

"You have just seen Deep Red." See more »

Alternate Versions

A full screen Italian language version with American Subtitles contains the credits scene with David Hemmings reacting to the death of the killer in a pool of blood. The last few frames pause the image finally. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Fear at 400 Degrees: The Cine-Excess of 'Suspiria' (2009) See more »

User Reviews

Deep Red is a simply brilliant masterpiece.
12 June 2007 | by MaterSuspiriorumSee all my reviews

Profondo Rosso is really the gem among Argento'a work, a film that managed to revolutionize the giallo and at the same moment become the ultimate giallo at that. You may ask what is a giallo? Well, it is basically a genre that combines mystery and horror, so it is basically a violent triller. It is the most plausible and well written film of his career to date and is the film that introduced us to the music of Goblin, a group that has become world renowned for their work on such classics as Suspiria and Dawn of the Dead. But what is really brilliant about Profondo Rosso is that it is the first film we see Dario experiment and gain more confidence. His camera becomes more fluid and gains more movement and elegant, while the angles he chooses become more strange. He begins to pay more attention to color, submerging the film in deep reds and greens which makes this one a feast for the eyes. It is truly a beautiful film to behold, even when the killer's victims are been stabbed and whatever else. Dario in this film also pays attention to architecture. Helga Ulmann's apartment is lushly decorated in black and white marble, plants and also a star shaped table (we later learn she is Jewish so the star is in fact the Star of David). But the true masterpiece of the sets in Profondo Rosso is Dario's replica of the bar in Edward Hopper's Nighthawks. This is in a sense a homage to Edward, as is the school in the film which is called the Leonardo da Vinci. Dario incorporates the style of art nouveau into this film predominantly, which can be in seen the windows of the villa and Giordani's apartment. And I'm not forgetting the black gloves, one of Argento's trademarks. The Performances in Profondo Rosso are very good. David Hemmings and Dario Nicolodi provide great performances. Their chemistry is very evident and they are very believable. Hemmings is able to get across his character's insecurities, especially in the scene where he arm wrestles Daria's character. It is very clear that he is insecure about his masculinity, which is evident in the scene in Gianna's car where the seat breaks and drops and so it seems that Gianna has become the bigger person, much to Marcus' embarrassment. Daria puts in an excellent performance considering this was about only her third or fourth film. She definitely gets across Gianna's independence which provide the film with some comedy. Gabrile Lavia is also good as the alcoholic Carlo, clearly getting across Carlo's drunkenness with his constant movements, such as stumbling. Meril I found fantastic in the conference scene, especially when she says the line: "You have killed and you will kill again." When she revolts back it is so realistic and her hand movements really make us believe she can sense evil in the room, like as though she is feeling the presence. This is Goblin's first score and it is truly a masterpiece. The theme is brilliant and is really driving and fits the film perfectly. It is a really mesmerizing as is the infamous lullaby, a disturbing piece. Profondo Rosso is truly a brilliant piece of art. A great plot, fantastic music, breath-taking visuals, great performances and perfect direction. Not to be missed! 10/10


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Italy

Language:

Italian | German | English

Release Date:

11 June 1976 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Dripping Deep Red See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (R-rated) | (export)

Sound Mix:

Mono | 4-Track Stereo (Japan theatrical release)

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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