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For Your Eyes Only Was Not Supposed to Star Roger Moore

For Your Eyes Only Was Not Supposed to Star Roger Moore
For Your Eyes Only, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this week, was a transitional James Bond film. Released in 1981, this 12th entry in the long-running series, and Roger Moore’s fifth outing as the man in the tuxedo, was deliberately styled as a return to the 007’s roots after he went to space in the over-the-top Moonraker (1979): the one where series producers did their best to compete with Star Wars. By contrast Eyes seemed stripped down and also marked the debut of John Glen in the director’s chair—a position he would hold for a series-most five entries. He received that promotion after working on several previous installments as a second unit director.

But Eyes was also meant, at one point, to usher in the most important change in any Bond movie: the introduction of a new actor in the role of 007.

Roger Moore’s original contract was for three films,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Disney’s Live Action ‘Little Mermaid’ Set to Shoot in Sardinia

Disney’s Live Action ‘Little Mermaid’ Set to Shoot in Sardinia
Disney’s live action adaptation of “The Little Mermaid,” starring R&b singer Halle Bailey as Ariel, is set to shoot on the Italian island of Sardinia, known for its crystal clear emerald waters.

Production crew of the hotly anticipated Disney pic, directed by Rob Marshall, is expected to start disembarking in Sardinia in coming weeks. The shoot will be moving from London’s Pinewood Studios to the small seaside village of Santa Teresa di Gallura, on the island’s northern coast, according to a local press report, which sources have confirmed. The area is known for its stunning, super clean seafront, rocky shore and Bronze Age artifacts.

Cameras are expected to start rolling in early summer on the Sardinia portion of the “Little Mermaid” shoot, according to local tourism official Fabrizio Scolafurru, who was speaking with Sardinian newspaper La Nuova Sardegna.

The proud Sardinian official said “Little Mermaid” will
See full article at Variety »

The Spy Who Loved Me: 10 Reasons The James Bond Movie Is Nothing Like The Novel

The Spy Who Loved Me: 10 Reasons The James Bond Movie Is Nothing Like The Novel
The Spy Who Loved Me is considered to be one of the best James Bond movies of all time, with Roger Moore giving one of his best performances as 007. With that being said, fans of the novels are aware that the film is nothing like the novel it's based on.

Related: The Spy Who Loved Me & 9 Other Roger Moore Movies, Ranked According To Rotten Tomatoes

Ian Fleming's most controversial novel by far, The Spy Who Loved Me was not only hated by fans, but Fleming wasn't a fan of it either. There are a lot of reasons that the plot of the book was axed in favor of Bond's aquatic adventure. In short, it's a miracle!
See full article at Screen Rant »

February 16th Genre Releases Include Lovecraft Country: The Complete First Season (Blu-ray/DVD), Random Acts Of Violence (Blu-ray/DVD), The Unseen (Blu-ray)

February 16th Genre Releases Include Lovecraft Country: The Complete First Season (Blu-ray/DVD), Random Acts Of Violence (Blu-ray/DVD), The Unseen (Blu-ray)
Hello everyone! We’re back to give you the lowdown on another week of home media releases, and while we don’t have a ton of titles on tap, there are still a few key releases genre fans are going to want to pick up this Tuesday.

If you missed it during its run on HBO, you can finally catch up with the first season of Lovecraft Country, as Warner Bros. is bringing it home on both Blu-ray and DVD. Jay Baruchel’s Random Acts of Violence is also headed to both formats this week, or if you’re in the mood for something a little more old school, both The Unseen and Slithis are getting the Blu-ray treatment on Tuesday as well.

Other home media releases for February 16th include Bad Impulse, Butchers, The Leprechaun’s Game and Mask of Thorn.

Lovecraft Country: The Complete First Season

Based on the 2016 novel by Matt Ruff,
See full article at DailyDead »

The Spy Who Loved Me & 9 Other Roger Moore Movies, Ranked According To Rotten Tomatoes

The Spy Who Loved Me & 9 Other Roger Moore Movies, Ranked According To Rotten Tomatoes
Roger Moore often gets a lot of flak for his turn as James Bond. During Moore's tenure, the Bond series took on a far more comedic and lighthearted tone, and many people were of the opinion that Moore wasn't as charming or charismatic as his predecessor, Sean Connery. Moore was also dealt a bad hand, as many of his movies were poorly written and directed.

Related: The Spy Who Loved Me: 10 Ways It's Roger Moore's Best Bond Movie

However, his status and legacy increased throughout the years, and Moore is now regarded as one of the finest Bonds. However, the James Bond series shouldn't define Moore's career. He has actually starred in quite a few great movies.
See full article at Screen Rant »

A Triple Hit of Vintage Pam Grier

A Triple Hit of Vintage Pam Grier
Tom Jolliffe looks back on three of Pam Grier’s iconic Blaxploitation era films, Foxy Brown, Coffy and The Big Bird Cage… Remember the theme song for The Spy Who Loved Me? Nobody does it better…Well, when it comes to being the undisputed Queen of Blaxploitation cinema, really, nobody did it better than Pam Grier. Modern […]

The post A Triple Hit of Vintage Pam Grier appeared first on Flickering Myth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Furniture: A Centennial Tribute to Ken Adam and The Ipcress File

The Furniture: A Centennial Tribute to Ken Adam and The Ipcress File
"The Furniture," by Daniel Walber. (Click on images for magnified detail)

Ken Adam in 1976. Photo © Deutchse Kinemathek

Today marks the centennial of legendary production designer Ken Adam, the artist responsible for some of the biggest film sets of the 20th century. The first that comes to mind for me is the supertanker in The Spy Who Loved Me, built on the world’s largest sound stage. Adam designed dozens of secret military facilities and hidden lairs for the seven James Bond films he worked on. But his most famous is probably the “War Room” from Dr. Strangelove, another vast interior - and the reason he had to turn down From Russia with Love.

Adam’s legacy is intimately connected to these atomic fantasies, which continue to influence our collective memory of the Cold War...
See full article at FilmExperience »

February 2nd Genre Releases Include Host (Blu-ray/DVD), Horror Noire: A History Of Black Horror (Blu-ray/DVD), The Great Alligator (Blu-ray)

February 2nd Genre Releases Include Host (Blu-ray/DVD), Horror Noire: A History Of Black Horror (Blu-ray/DVD), The Great Alligator (Blu-ray)
Happy Monday, dear readers! We have a brand new slate of home media releases to look forward to as we head into a new month, and there are some great films coming out on Tuesday that genre fans will definitely want to pick up. Rlje Films is finally releasing Horror Noire on both Blu-ray and DVD this week, and they’re also bringing home arguably the most talked-about horror film of 2020 as well: Rob Savage’s Host. Kino Lorber is showing some love to Dark Intruder with their new 2K Blu, and Code Red is giving us more reasons to fear the water with their Blu-ray for The Great Alligator.

Other releases for February 2nd include Satan’s Blood, Sky Sharks, Deadcon, and Hellkat.

Dark Intruder

Brand New 2K Master! Dark Intruder stars Leslie Nielsen (Forbidden Planet) as Brett Kingsford, an Occult expert who is brought in by police to help
See full article at DailyDead »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Blood On Satan’S Claw (1971)

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Blood On Satan’S Claw (1971)
For me it usually starts with the title, and The Blood on Satan’s Claw (1971) has a doozy; provocative and exploitative, it evokes images of rituals, bloodlust, and other sundry delights. And sometimes the stars align, the film more or less living up to the promise of the title, or at least to the promise of the promise.

Released by Cannon Releasing Corp. Stateside in April and by its own Tigon Pictures in the U.K. in July, The Blood on Satan’s Claw didn’t do well; Tigon had a hit with The Witchfinder General (1968) with Vincent Price, and were looking to replicate that success. Regardless of its fate, The Blood on Satan’s Claw is an effective example of folk-horror, killer kids, and some light Satanism, as a treat.

We open on a field in early 18th Century England, as Ralph (Barry Andrews - The Spy Who Loved Me) ploughs the
See full article at DailyDead »

Roger Moore: James Bond Revisited - Moonraker

  • JoBlo
Roger Moore: James Bond Revisited - Moonraker
James Bond in space! I know, I know - sounds crazy, right? Well, it actually happened back in 1979. In the wake of The Spy Who Loved Me's major box office success, another Bond movie was greenlit, and originally the plan was to do For Your Eyes Only. But then, a little movie called Star Wars came out and the decision was made to compete by making the next 007 flick sci-fi. The result was Moonraker, a Roger Moore James Bond film that's often much maligned by fans,…
See full article at JoBlo »

007: 10 Behind The Scenes Facts About For Your Eyes Only

007: 10 Behind The Scenes Facts About For Your Eyes Only
Though not as beloved as Roger Moore's other Bond films such as The Spy Who Loved Me, For Your Eyes Only is notable for a few reasons. The 12th Bond film actually feels more Ian Fleming than the typical Moore affair, featuring a darker story and a more ruthless Bond.

Related: James Bond: Why Jaws Didn't Return In For Your Eyes Only

With that being said, there was quite a bit riding on this movie and a lot of turmoil going into the filming. With No Time To Die only a few months away, perhaps it's time to revisit this underrated 007 adventure and take a gander at what went down behind the curtain.
See full article at Screen Rant »

The Spy Who Loved Me: 10 Ways It's Roger Moore's Best Bond Movie

The Spy Who Loved Me: 10 Ways It's Roger Moore's Best Bond Movie
No actor has continuously held the role of James Bond for longer than Roger Moore. After Sean Connery defined the character with his initial stint in the role and George Lazenby held his own in a solid single outing, Moore took over playing the gentleman spy starting with Live and Let Die. Moore played Bond in seven movies across the ‘70s and ‘80s, holding the role well into his twilight years.

Related: 007: 10 Behind-The-Scenes Facts About The Spy Who Loved Me

From the opening Union Jack parachute jump to the big supertanker finale, 1977’s The Spy Who Loved Me is Moore’s greatest 007 outing by far, and one of the franchise’s all-time best installments.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Peter Lamont obituary

Peter Lamont obituary
Production designer who worked on James Bond films from Goldfinger to Casino Royale, and won an Oscar for Titanic

The production designer Peter Lamont, who has died aged 91, worked on every James Bond film between Goldfinger (1963), the third in the series, and Casino Royale (2006), the 21st official instalment. He was absent during that time only from Tomorrow Never Dies, which clashed with James Cameron’s Titanic (also 1997). It was Lamont’s work on the latter which brought him an Oscar, following nominations for Fiddler on the Roof (1971), the Bond adventure The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Cameron’s horror sequel Aliens (1986).

As he moved up the ladder from draughtsman to set decorator and art director before finally being appointed production designer on For Your Eyes Only (1981), Lamont became a prized member of the Bond family. “I so admire Peter and his colleagues,” said Roger Moore in his 2008 autobiography My Word Is My Bond.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Remembering Peter Lamont, Oscar-winning Production Designer

  • CinemaRetro
Remembering Peter Lamont, Oscar-winning Production Designer
Peter Lamont interviewed by Gareth Owen at a celebration of his career at Pinewood Studios, 2016. (Photo: Mark Mawston).

We at Cinema Retro mourn the passing of our good friend Peter Lamont, the legendary Production Designer of many James Bond films as well as "Titanic", for which he received the Academy Award. Cr columnist and author Gareth Owen reflects on Peter's life and career.

By Gareth Owen

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British Oscar winning (and four-time nominee) Production Designer Peter Lamont passed away on December 18th aged 91 after suffering complications from pneumonia.

Having seen his name on the silver screen throughout my formative years on films such as The Seven Percent Solution, Sleuth, Fiddler On The Roof, and of course pretty much every James Bond film, I first met Peter in 1990 at Pinewood Studios and was immediately struck by his friendliness, charm and modesty. I bumped into him
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Star Wars: Original Boba Fett actor Jeremy Bulloch passes away

Star Wars: Original Boba Fett actor Jeremy Bulloch passes away
Veteran actor Jeremy Bulloch passed away on Thursday.

The English actor, who is best known for the role of the bounty hunter Boba Fett in the original 'Star Wars' trilogy reportedly died at a London hospital following from health complications after years of living with Parkinson’s disease. He was 75, reports Kcra.

The actor's death was confirmed by his agents at Brown, Simcocks & Andrews via his website, which said he spent his final days St George’s Hospital in Tooting, London.

"Jeremy died peacefully on 17th December 2020 following health complications, including several years living with Parkinson's disease. He spent his final weeks in the wonderful care of staff at St George's Hospital in Tooting, close to the house where he and his wife Maureen had lived together for more than fifty years. Maureen and two of his sons, Jamie and Robbie, were with him during his final days," read the statement.
See full article at GlamSham »

How Boba Fett Actor Jeremy Bulloch Set the Template for The Mandalorian

How Boba Fett Actor Jeremy Bulloch Set the Template for The Mandalorian
Boba Fett’s green, T-visored helmet is a menacing visage that’s nearly evocative of Star Wars as Darth Vader’s; one first embodied on film by actor Jeremy Bulloch, who, sadly, passed away on December 17 at the age of 75. However, the legacy that Bulloch leaves behind has proven far greater than a character with minimal screentime and dubbed lines seemingly had any right to possess. It’s a legacy to which hit Disney+ series The Mandalorian owes a great deal of thanks.

Bulloch, born in Leicestershire, England on February 16, 1945, wasted little time getting himself onscreen with uncredited roles—while still an adolescent—in 1958 films Violent Playground and Titanic tragedy movie A Night to Remember, continuing to work steadily for years in U.K.-aimed films and television shows. He fielded a notable four-episode 1974 run as Hal the Archer on Doctor Who (opposite Jon Pertwee’s Third Doctor); his second run on the series,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Peter Lamont Dies: Oscar-Winning Production Designer Of Bond Films, ‘Aliens,’ ‘Titanic’ Was 91

Peter Lamont Dies: Oscar-Winning Production Designer Of Bond Films, ‘Aliens,’ ‘Titanic’ Was 91
Oscar-winning production designer, art director and set decorator Peter Lamont has died. Lamont, along with longtime collaborator Peter Ford, was responsible for the aesthetic of nearly every James Bond film from Goldfinger through 2006’s Casino Royale. That’s no small feat, given the series’ high standards for style.

Lamont was a four-time Oscar nominee, taking home the trophy for art decoration on Titanic, while Ford was recognized for set decoration on the film. Lamont was also nominated for Fiddler on the Roof, The Spy Who Loved Me and Aliens.

News of his passing was confirmed by Bond producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, who had this to say on the official 007 Twitter account: “Peter Lamont was a much beloved member of the Bond family and a giant in the industry. Inextricably linked with the design and aesthetic of James Bond since Goldfinger (1964).”

Peter Lamont has died at the age of 91. Michael G.
See full article at Deadline »

Peter Lamont, Production Designer on Bond Films Who Won Oscar for ‘Titanic,’ Dies at 91

Peter Lamont, Production Designer on Bond Films Who Won Oscar for ‘Titanic,’ Dies at 91
Four-time Oscar nominee Peter Lamont, who worked on 18 James Bond films and received an Academy Award for production design for “Titanic,” has died. He was 91.

Lamont’s death was disclosed Friday by the official 007 account on Twitter, which posted a statement by producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli that reads, “Peter Lamont was a much beloved member of the Bond family and a giant in the industry. Inextricably linked with the design and aesthetic of James Bond since Goldfinger (1964).”

“He became Production Designer on For Your Eyes Only (1981) working on 18 of the 25 films including nine as Production Designer. He was a true success story proving that with talent and hard work you will achieve your dreams,” the statement went on. “He won the Academy Award for Titanic in 1998 as well as nominations for Fiddler On The Roof (1971), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), and Aliens (1986). Our hearts go out to
See full article at Variety »

Peter Lamont, ‘Titanic,’ ‘Aliens’ and Bond Film Production Designer, Dies at 91

Peter Lamont, ‘Titanic,’ ‘Aliens’ and Bond Film Production Designer, Dies at 91
Peter Lamont, a legendary production designer who worked on James Cameron’s “Aliens” and many of the James Bond films, and who won an Oscar for his work on Cameron’s “Titanic,” has died. He was 91.

Lamont’s death was announced on the 007 official Twitter account Friday alongside a photo of him on set of the 1964 Bond film “Goldfinger.” No other details about his passing were given.

“Peter Lamont was a much beloved member of the Bond family and a giant in the industry. Inextricably linked with the design and aesthetic of James Bond since ‘Goldfinger,'” 007 producers Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson said in a statement.

The statement continued: “He became production designer on ‘For Your Eyes Only’ (1981) working on 18 of the 25 films, including nine as production designer. He was a true success story proving that with talent and hard work you will achieve your dreams. He won
See full article at The Wrap »

Boba Fett Actor Jeremy Bulloch from Original ‘Star Wars’ Films Dies at 75

  • Indiewire
Boba Fett Actor Jeremy Bulloch from Original ‘Star Wars’ Films Dies at 75
Reports have emerged from the “Star Wars” community that Jeremy Bulloch, the actor who originated the iconic “Star Wars” bounty hunter Boba Fett in “The Empire Strikes Back” and “Return of the Jedi,” has died. The retired English actor was 75. The news was first announced on fan site Fantha Tracks following a Facebook post by U.K.-based convention organizer Jason Griffiths, a friend of Bulloch’s.

While Bulloch remains best known as the actor behind the suit in the second two films of the original trilogy, he also cameoed in other “Star Wars” properties, including in “Star Wars: Episode III — Revenge of the Sith” as Captain Colton, a Clone Wars era pilot with a long record of service in the Royal House of Alderaan. The actor got his start on TV shows, such as “Billy Bunter of Greyfriars School” and “The Newcomers,” and though he wore the original Boba
See full article at Indiewire »
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