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Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)

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1:53 | Trailer
When an alien spacecraft of enormous power is spotted approaching Earth, Admiral James T. Kirk resumes command of the overhauled USS Enterprise in order to intercept it.

Director:

Robert Wise

Writers:

Gene Roddenberry (based on "Star Trek" created by), Harold Livingston (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
3,256 ( 129)
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
William Shatner ... Capt. James T. Kirk
Leonard Nimoy ... Spock
DeForest Kelley ... Dr. McCoy
James Doohan ... Scotty
George Takei ... Sulu
Majel Barrett ... Dr. Chapel
Walter Koenig ... Chekov
Nichelle Nichols ... Uhura
Persis Khambatta ... Ilia
Stephen Collins ... Decker
Grace Lee Whitney ... Janice Rand
Mark Lenard ... Klingon Captain
Billy Van Zandt ... Rhaandarite Ensign
Roger Aaron Brown ... Epsilon Technician
Gary Faga Gary Faga ... Airlock Technician
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Storyline

A massive alien spacecraft of enormous power destroys three powerful Klingon cruisers as it makes its way towards Federation space. Admiral James T. Kirk is ordered to take command of the USS Enterprise for the first time since her historic five-year mission. The Epsilon IX space station alerts the Federation, but they are also destroyed by the alien spacecraft. The only starship in range is the Enterprise, after undergoing a major overhaul in drydock orbiting Earth. Kirk rounds up the rest of his crew, and acquires some new members, and sets off to intercept the alien spacecraft. However, it has been three years since Kirk last went into deep space - is he up to the task of saving Earth? Written by Colin Tinto <cst@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The human adventure is just beginning See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Three types of uniforms were fabricated: dress uniforms used for special occasions, Class A uniforms for regular duty, and Class B uniforms as an alternative. The Class A designs were double-stitched in gabardine and featured gold braid designating rank. It was felt that the traditional four gold sleeve stripes for the Captain's rank was too blatantly militaristic. Jon Povill had to send out a memo to Robert Fletcher with the modified stripe rank system, as the designer continued to get the 20th and 23rd centuries confused. Fletcher designed the Class B uniform as similar to evolved t-shirts, with shoulder boards used to indicate rank and service divisions. Each costume had the shoes built into the pant leg, to further the futuristic look. See more »

Goofs

As the travel pod flies by to dock with Enterprise, it is shown passing in front of a light beam that was pointing at the Enterprise's warp drive section. When the travel pod passes in front of the beam, it is lighted. However, there should have been a shadow on the Enterprise when the transporter passed by. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Klingon captain: [giving an order in Klingon] Tactical...
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Crazy Credits

End title: "The human adventure is just beginning." See more »

Alternate Versions

Network television and pan-and-scan home video versions run 143 minutes. Here is the added footage:
  • Decker asks Sulu to take Ilia "in hand". He then gives her a brief explanation of the computer. Ilia reminds Sulu of her oath of celibacy, and Decker informs Ilia that the captain didn't mean anything personally, and Ilia says she would never take advantage of a sexually immature species.
  • After the wormhole, and after Kirk, Bones and Decker depart for quarters, there is another short Sulu/Ilia exchange about current speed and current heading. Ilia then confirms it. Both these scenes were apparently shot to provide a sense of romance between the two, but were deleted to clear up Decker's same relation.
  • Rather than Kirk saying, "Make your point, Doctor" when discussing the obsession with the Enterprise, there is one brief exchange, and McCoy gives his line in a medium shot, rather than a shot of the two standing side-by-side.
  • During the attack on the Enterprise, the ship actually gets hit by an extra energy torpedo. We hear it, and the lighting also suggests it, but we never see it. Some minor scene extensions are added. There is also an alternate take of Spock's analysis.
  • There is a short scene in which Spock reveals the frequency of V'Ger's transmission. This appears in the Director's Edition.
  • Decker takes over Chekov after his hand is burned, and a female crew member takes over for him. Decker goes to help Spock, and we return to the theatrical footage of the second (or third) energy torpedo being fired.
  • Chekov returns to his post after a humorous exchange from Spock and Bones reveals that V'Ger emits more radiation than the Sun.
  • The famous footage of Kirk shadowing Spock during the space walk sequence is included.
  • There is an alternate take when Nurse Chapel gives Ilia's headband to the Ilia probe.
  • The Ilia probe mentions that the creator is on the third planet. She then removes the headband, and asks why two carbon units have entered V'Ger. Bones replies that they wish to contact it. Decker asks if V'Ger has a problem with that, and Ilia says no. V'Ger will find out their purpose. Bones says it is to survive, and Ilia says it is V'Ger's purpose as well to survive. Decker implies that V'Ger's purpose was to find and join with the creator, and Ilia replies that is how V'Ger will survive.
  • Bones says V'Ger says its creator is a machine, to which Decker replies "We all create God in our own image."
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Connections

Followed by Star Trek: First Contact (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

Theme from 'Star Trek: The television Series'
Written by Alexander Courage and Gene Roddenberry
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User Reviews

 
Star Trek: A Comotion About a Picture . . .
25 May 2007 | by MC1-BjornsonSee all my reviews

'Star Trek: The Motion Picture', originally released Friday, December 7th, 1979. - ORIGINAL Theatrical Version, 1979, Running Time 2hrs&12mn, Rated "G" by the MPAA - SPECIAL Extended Version, 1983, Running Time 2hrs&23mn, Rated "G" by the MPAA - The DIRECTOR's Edition, 2001, Running Time 2hrs&16mn, Rated "PG" by the MPAA - CONTENT for all three versions includes: Mild Adult Language, Mild Sexual Innuendo and Mild Violence.

My take *** (Out of ****) - or 7/10 on the IMDb Scale.

'Star Trek: The Motion Picture' is the big screen debut of the continuation of the science fiction television series 'Star Trek'. The show chronicled the adventures of the crew of the space-going USS Enterprise. The ship explored the galaxy during a historic five-year mission under the command of the charismatic Captain James T. Kirk. Other crew members included the logical first officer/science officer Spock, a half human/half Vulcan hybrid (Vulcans are an alien race, complete with pointed ears) and the passionate country doctor Leonard "Bones" McCoy. The TV series ran on NBC from 1966 to 1969.

'Star Trek' takes place in the latter half of the 23rd Century. Mankind has formed alliances with many alien races from planets throughout the galaxy, collectively forming The United Federation of Planets. These societies thrive peacefully and continue to develop together and independently. To protect this Federation from hostiles and seek out new lifeforms and new civilizations is Starfleet. This organization is diplomatic and scientific, yet serves as a military force as needed.

The movie opens two & 1/2 years after the completion of the starship Enterprise's five year mission. The spaceship is orbiting Earth, in a dry-dock of sorts, completing a complex overhaul. The planet Earth is in the path of a potential destructive alien intruder. The now Admiral Kirk (William Shatner) doesn't have time to spare during this crisis. He takes a grade reduction to captain, wrestling command of the Enterprise away from a less experienced skipper (Stephen Collins), and sets out to counter the alien threat before it can reach Earth. Most of his original crew has been re-assembled for this undertaking. Shortly after Kirk & team embark to stop the intruder, Spock (Leonard Nimoy) joins them on their quest.

'Star Trek: The Motion Picture' trades in on the action, good drama, suspense and wit the TV series offered to a degree. Kirk & company are here pretty much for the ride, instead of being the leaders they're known as. The movie moves at a slow pace, gradually getting into the intricacies of the alien menace. There's a lot of time adoring spaceships as they travel through space. There's not much in the way of real character development.

Despite the compromises, 'Star Trek: The Motion Picture' works on some level. It's interesting to see the familiar crew in action once again. There are some very fundamental questions asked in the movie that we all have asked ourselves. I found those questions to be intriguing. ST:TMP wants to be intellectual and it succeeds a lot of the time.

Jerry Goldsmith, the film's music composer, provides us with one of the most memorable scores in motion picture history. This is a huge plus for a movie noticeably deficient in personality. This lovely score helps to make up for that. The film almost plays like an elaborate special effects music video set to this grand rousing score. I appreciated the film on this level too.

The special effects by John Dykstra were highly imaginative for the late 1970s. They still hold up well over the decades and continue to enthrall me, especially with the mystery of the alien intruder. The intruder sound effects also succeed in giving me an appropriate sense of awe and dread.

The 2001 Director's Edition is the best version of the movie. The theatrical version was rushed to make the movie's scheduled release date. It was regarded by director Robert Wise as incomplete. 'The Director's Edition' restores Wise's planned vision for the movie. This version streamlines the pace of the movie, adds a little more depth to the characters and has the originally desired sound-mix and completed special effects restored for this edition.

'Star Trek: The Motion Picture' was followed by nine sequels to date and four new TV series. There is an eleventh movie currently in production.

'Star Trek: The Motion Picture' was a shaky start for the launch of the 'Star Trek' film series. It's better to simply except this picture for what it is, rather than for what it isn't. It's not a perfect movie, but it did what it set out to do. It invited me for a journey offering good special effects, a great music score and a beloved crew back on the job. The movie also gave me something to think about. It could have been a better movie, but it's still a marginally satisfying one. Though clearly not for everyone, I recommend it to those who would welcome the philosophical ride it offers.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Startrek.com

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Klingon

Release Date:

8 December 1979 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Star Trek: The Motion Picture - The Director's Edition See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$35,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$11,926,421, 9 December 1979

Gross USA:

$82,604,699

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$82,604,699
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut) | (TV)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital EX (director's cut)| Dolby

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

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