5.5/10
9,059
58 user 24 critic

City Heat (1984)

Slick Private Investigator Mike Murphy (Burt Reynolds) and tough Police Lieutenant Speer (Clint Eastwood), once partners, now bitter enemies, reluctantly team up to investigate a murder.

Director:

Richard Benjamin

Writers:

Blake Edwards (story) (as Sam O. Brown), Blake Edwards (as Sam O. Brown) | 1 more credit »
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Clint Eastwood ... Lieutenant Speer
Burt Reynolds ... Mike Murphy
Jane Alexander ... Addy
Madeline Kahn ... Caroline Howley
Rip Torn ... Primo Pitt
Irene Cara ... Ginny Lee
Richard Roundtree ... Dehl Swift
Tony Lo Bianco ... Leon Coll
William Sanderson ... Lonnie Ash
Nicholas Worth ... Troy Roker
Robert Davi ... Nino
Jude Farese Jude Farese ... Dub Slack
John Hancock ... Fat Freddy
Jack Thibeau ... Garage Soldier
Gerald S. O'Loughlin ... Counterman Louie
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Storyline

Kansas City in the 1930s: Private Investigator Mike Murphy's (Burt Reynolds') partner is brutally murdered when he tries to blackmail a mobster with his secret accounting records. When a rival gang boss goes after the missing records, ex-policeman Murphy is forced to team up again with his ex-partner Lieutenant Speer (Clint Eastwood), even though they can't stand each other, to fight both gangs before Kansas City erupts in a mob war. Written by Tom Zoerner <Tom.Zoerner@informatik.uni-erlangen.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Take Clint the street-smart cop . . . take Burt the wise-guy private eye . . . and then take cover! See more »

Genres:

Action | Comedy | Crime

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Burt Reynolds had initially suggested Richard Kiel, his longtime friend and co-star from The Longest Yard (1974) and Cannonball Run II (1984), for the part as the villainous thug Troy Roker. But Clint Eastwood refused because he had the intention to use Kiel in his next movie, Pale Rider (1985). See more »

Goofs

In the scene where Spear gets into a shoot-out with the thug in the hallway and stairwell, he shoots the thug a total of eight times, all in the upper chest area. However, later when he and Murphy are examining the bodies in the morgue, there is an overhead shot of the same thug and he has no upper chest wounds of any kind. See more »

Quotes

Caroline Howley: [Speer and Murphy have just rescued her from kidnappers] Well, it's about time!
See more »

Connections

Referenced in At the Movies: Dune/Starman/Mass Appeal/Runaway (1984) See more »

Soundtracks

Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea
Music by Harold Arlen
Lyrics by Ted Koehler
Sung by Eloise Laws
See more »

User Reviews

 
Shocking what Prohibition causes some people to drink these days.
13 April 2015 | by hitchcockthelegendSee all my reviews

The weight of expectation for City Heat was massive, two iconic Hollywood actors together in a buddy buddy cop movie, one with nods and homages to film noir and old school gangster movies, it wasn't unreasonable to expect a movie to sit with the best on Clint Eastwood and Burt Reynold's then CV's circa 1984. Unfortunately it's no masterpiece or close to being in the upper echelon's of each actor's respective works. But that doesn't make it a bad film.

A change of director saw Blake Edwards replaced by Richard Benjamin after Eastwood and Edwards, ahem, couldn't see eye to eye, so that immediately put the film on the back foot in many critic's eyes. Ironically Benjamin does OK - working from Edwards' script (there's a whole bunch of back stories and tittle-tattle assigned to this film if you care to search for it). Lots of fun here, though, as Clint and Burt, one a cop, the other an ex-cop turned PI, reluctantly team up to cut a swathe through the gangsters ruling the roost in prohibition era Kansas City.

Eastwood does his straight backed machismo act, throwing awesome punches along the way, while Reynolds is wonderfully cheerful as a tough guy who all things considered, would rather not get hurt! The script is full of zingers, delivered with customary sardonic self parody by the stars, while the roll call of supporting actors is not to be sniffed at. Period detail is high end, with Nick McLean's photography carrying the requisite neo-noir impact, while the music tracking is pleasingly nostalgic.

It's over the top of course and needlessly convoluted as per its yearning to be noirish, yet if you can cut back your expectation levels? And you can simply enjoy the sight of Eastwood and Reynolds having fun romping in this period? Then you just might enjoy this more than you dared to believe. 7/10


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 December 1984 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Kansas City Jazz See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,301,694, 9 December 1984

Gross USA:

$38,348,988

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$38,348,988
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Blu-ray)

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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