When a secretary's idea is stolen by her boss, she seizes an opportunity to steal it back by pretending she has her boss' job.

Director:

Mike Nichols

Writer:

Kevin Wade
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3,077 ( 535)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 8 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Harrison Ford ... Jack Trainer
Sigourney Weaver ... Katharine Parker
Melanie Griffith ... Tess McGill
Alec Baldwin ... Mick Dugan
Joan Cusack ... Cyn
Philip Bosco ... Oren Trask
Nora Dunn ... Ginny
Oliver Platt ... Lutz
James Lally James Lally ... Turkel
Kevin Spacey ... Bob Speck
Robert Easton ... Armbrister
Olympia Dukakis ... Personnel Director
Amy Aquino ... Alice Baxter
Jeffrey Nordling ... Tim Rourke
Elizabeth Whitcraft Elizabeth Whitcraft ... Doreen DiMucci
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Storyline

Tess McGill is a frustrated secretary, struggling to forge ahead in the world of big business in New York. She gets her chance when her boss breaks her leg on a skiing holiday. McGill takes advantage of her absence to push ahead with her career. She teams up with investment broker Jack Trainer to work on a big deal. The situation is complicated after the return of her boss. Written by Sami Al-Taher <staher2000@yahoo.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

...Her Time Has Come See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This would be the second encounter between Harrison Ford and Sigourney Weaver had Ford accepted the part of Captain Dallas in Alien (1979). See more »

Goofs

When Trask jumps off the elevator to hear Tess explain how she developed her idea, the elevator doors close behind him. As is clearly evident earlier in the same scene, the doors would have automatically reopened when sensing a body or other object in the way. However, the doors can only sense an obstruction by touch, and in the earlier instances he touched the doors for them to reopen. The doors don't reopen when he gets out because he doesn't touch them. See more »

Quotes

Cynthia: Whaddya need speech class for, ya talk fine!
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Connections

Referenced in Full House: Working Girl (1991) See more »

Soundtracks

Straight from the Heart
Written by Greg C. Jackson
Performed by The Gap Band
Courtesy of Total Experience Records/Lonnie Simmons
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User Reviews

 
"She's your man"
29 November 2011 | by Steffi_PSee all my reviews

Although the 60s and 70s are thought of as the age of feminism, it wasn't really until the 80s that women really achieved a bit of equality in movie land. But this being a less radical time, the dramas about powerful women tended to be a synthesis of Women's Lib and Reagan era entrepreneurial optimism. This is after all what success meant in that decade. But of-its-time as it is, Working Girl is still an entertaining and uplifting picture.

Written by Kevin Wade, Working Girl is a nice, neatly-constructed story. On a broad level it could be seen a black-and-white tale of good guys and bad guys. But what saves the characters from appearing one-dimensional is that they are written with a great deal of knowing realism. Who hasn't worked for a boss like Sigourney Weaver's character, or been cheated on by a jerk like Alec Baldwin's? One thing that keeps Working Girl engaging is that, while not an out-and-out comedy it is often tentatively funny in the way that real life is funny, such as Alec Baldwin's futile claim that "This isn't what it looks like".

The effectiveness of Working Girl often hinges on the way its characters are projected. On paper, Tess McGill isn't necessarily sympathetic, and neither is Katherine Parker necessarily unpleasant, at least not in the first half of the movie. However, Melanie Griffith portrays the lead with enough drive to appear credible as a go-getter, but all wrapped in a kind of sensitive charm that makes her likable. It's lucky she didn't inherit her mother's steeliness. And Sigourney Weaver manages to convey a smug and patronising manner that is only hinted at in the script, but never quite overdoing it so it is still believable that Griffith initially warms to her. Harrison Ford is at his best too, moulding the role round his limited range by giving a business-world version of his usual level-headed action hero type.

If you're a fan of the look of this era, Working Girl will be a real treat for the eyes – everything from glorious cityscapes to pouffy dresses. I'm glad director Mike Nichols puts such an emphasis on places and props, without loosing sight of the people of course. The changing fashions of the decade are even woven into the movie's themes, as Griffith swaps her hairsprayed bouffant and dangly bangles for an elegant, simple look. Working Girl is an incredibly 80s movie, but it's also the death of 80s extravagance we're witnessing there on screen. Of course, she still wears a pair of pink glasses with rims the size of beermats, but there you go. 80s extravagance died hard.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 December 1988 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Working Girl See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$28,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,718,485, 26 December 1988

Gross USA:

$63,779,477

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$102,953,112
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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