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Driving Miss Daisy (1989)

PG | | Drama | 26 January 1990 (USA)
An old Jewish woman and her African-American chauffeur in the American South have a relationship that grows and improves over the years.

Director:

Bruce Beresford

Writers:

Alfred Uhry (screenplay), Alfred Uhry (play)
Reviews
Popularity
4,415 ( 850)
Won 4 Oscars. Another 17 wins & 24 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Morgan Freeman ... Hoke Colburn
Jessica Tandy ... Daisy Werthan
Dan Aykroyd ... Boolie Werthan
Patti LuPone ... Florine Werthan (as Patti Lupone)
Esther Rolle ... Idella
Jo Ann Havrilla Jo Ann Havrilla ... Miss McClatchey (as Joann Havrilla)
William Hall Jr. William Hall Jr. ... Oscar
Alvin M. Sugarman Alvin M. Sugarman ... Dr. Weil
Clarice F. Geigerman Clarice F. Geigerman ... Nonie
Muriel Moore Muriel Moore ... Miriam
Sylvia Kaler Sylvia Kaler ... Beulah
Carolyn Gold Carolyn Gold ... Neighbor Lady
Crystal Fox ... Katie Bell (as Crystal R. Fox)
Bob Hannah ... Red Mitchell
Ray McKinnon ... Trooper #1
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Storyline

An elderly Jewish widow living in Atlanta can no longer drive. Her son insists she allow him to hire a driver, which in the 1950s meant a black man. She resists any change in her life but, Hoke, the driver is hired by her son. She refuses to allow him to drive her anywhere at first, but Hoke slowly wins her over with his native good graces. The movie is directly taken from a stage play and does show it. It covers over twenty years of the pair's life together as they slowly build a relationship that transcends their differences. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The funny, touching and totally irresistible story of a working relationship that became a 25-year friendship. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

While being interviewed in the 2008 PBS mini-series The Jewish Americans (2008), Alfred Uhry, who wrote the film's screenplay, and grew up as a Jewish child in Atlanta during the 40s and 50s, admitted that many Jews in Atlanta celebrated Christmas, like Boolie and his wife, in an attempt to be a part of a community, where Jews were a minority. See more »

Goofs

In one of the scenes where Hoke is driving Miss Daisy through her Atlanta neighborhood, if you look out the car window, you will see a 1980's Chrysler/Dodge minivan parked at a home in the background. There were no 80's minivans around in the era of the film. See more »

Quotes

Hoke Colburn: [on a pay phone calling Boolie after taking Daisy to the Piggly Wiggly] Hello, Mr. Werthan? Yeah, it's me. Guess where I'm at? I jus' finished drivin' yo mama to da store.
[laughs]
Hoke Colburn: Oh, yeah, she flap around some, but she's all right, she in da store. Oh, Lord, she jus' looked out da window an' seen me on da phone... prob'ly gonna throw a fit right there at da checkout!
[pause]
Hoke Colburn: You sho' right about that! Only took me six days. Same time it took the Lord to make the world! All right, 'bye now!
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Crazy Credits

Film title logo appears at the end of closing credits See more »

Connections

Referenced in Modern Family: Dance Dance Revelation (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

After The Ball
(1892)
Words and Music by Charles Harris (as Charles K. Harris)
Sung a cappella by Jessica Tandy (uncredited)
Published by Charles K. Harris Publishing Company, Inc.
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User Reviews

 
Morgan Freeman and Jessica Tandy in a heart-warming, human story
11 April 2004 | by khatcher-2See all my reviews

Maybe 'the Shawshank Redemption' (1994) (qv) is a bigger, better, more brazen film, with far more pretensions, and is, of course, an excellent film: but I cannot avoid thinking that it is in 'Driving Miss Daisy' that Morgan Freeman develops his best rôle, playing so well opposite the unrepeatable Jessica Landry. I have not seen all of Freeman's films, nor do I wish to. Of those I have seen he is more or less 'O.K.' as you might say; What makes 'Driving Miss Daisy' work is the human and humane compassion and sympathy flowing between the two lead actors, with Dan Ackroyd, surprisingly, and Esther Rolle both lending a good hand. One might argue that it is 'only' an oversweetened sentimental story; be that as it may, the film endeavours to portray the aging relationship between the white Jewish rich woman and her poor black chauffeur throughout 25 years. And Jessica Landry was over eighty years old when she made this film. In this aspect, evidently the film succeeds, as the story itself is really of secondary importance: it is the beautifully filmed scenes and the dialogues which build up to something greater than the story per se. In an age dominated by cinema stuffed with violence, sex, special effects and so on, here is an example without such measures, relying on pure acting and interpretative skills so as to tell a clean simple story. You might well like to compare this film with Lindsay Anderson's 'The Whales of August' (1987) (qv), with an absolutely unrepeatable cast with Lillian Gish, Bette Davis, Vincent Price and Ann Sothern: a delicious retrospective piece. 'Driving Miss Daisy' was meticulously made, with all those cars of the 50's and 60's and the careful scene settings, brought out by excellent photography, and all backed up by what must be Hans Zimmer's most appropriate and touching score. His score was also good in that tremendous film 'Thelma and Louise' as well as in 'The House of the Spirits' and 'Beyond Rangoon' (1995) (qv). 'Driving Miss Daisy' is one of those videos in my collection which I am pleased to blow the dust off and watch yet again: it is still as charming as ever.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Hebrew

Release Date:

26 January 1990 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Driving Miss Daisy See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$7,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$73,745, 17 December 1989

Gross USA:

$106,593,296

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$145,793,296
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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