5.6/10
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272 user 119 critic

Judge Dredd (1995)

In a dystopian future, Joseph Dredd, the most famous Judge (a police officer with instant field judiciary powers), is convicted for a crime he did not commit and must face his murderous counterpart.

Director:

Danny Cannon

Writers:

John Wagner (characters), Carlos Ezquerra (characters) | 4 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
3,255 ( 44)
2 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Sylvester Stallone ... Judge Dredd
Armand Assante ... Rico
Rob Schneider ... Fergie
Jürgen Prochnow ... Judge Griffin (as Jurgen Prochnow)
Max von Sydow ... Judge Fargo
Diane Lane ... Judge Hershey
Joanna Miles ... McGruder
Joan Chen ... Ilsa
Balthazar Getty ... Olmeyer
Maurice Roëves ... Miller (as Maurice Roeves)
Ian Dury ... Geiger
Christopher Adamson ... Mean Machine (as Chris Adamson)
Ewen Bremner ... Junior Angel
Peter Marinker ... Judge Esposito
Angus MacInnes ... Judge Silver
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Storyline

In the year 2139, the Earth has changed into a virtually uninhabitable place called the Cursed Earth. All of the Earth's population have crowded into the cities across the planet, now known as Mega-Cities. The crimes in these Mega-Cities became so violent and so powerful, that the regular justice system was powerless to contain, then it collapsed completely. However, a new justice system came from the ashes, there were three justice systems in one (police, jury and executioner), they were called Judges. In Mega-City One (formerly, New York City), there was a Judge, named Joseph Dredd, who was the toughest and most stringent Judge in history. One day, he was charged with murder, and was tried and sentenced to life in prison because of it. Written by John Wiggins

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

One man is Judge, Jury, AND Executioner. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for continuous violent action | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was originally going to made back in the 1980s with Harrison Ford set to play Judge Dredd. See more »

Goofs

When Hershey asks Central to analyse an old photo of Dredd with Rico at the academy, Central gives the description "Unknown male, approximately 200 centimetres tall". 200 cm is nearly 6 feet 7 inches, Armand Assante (who plays Rico) is nowhere near this unusually tall height, his height is less than 6 foot. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: In the third millennium, the world changed. Climate, nations, all were in upheaval. The Earth transformed into a poisonous, scorched desert, known as "The Cursed Earth". Millions of people crowded into a few Megacities, where roving bands of street savages created violence the justice system could not control. Law, as we know it, collapsed. From the decay rose a new order, a society ruled by a new, elite force. A force with the power to dispense both justice and punishment. They ...
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Alternate Versions

The UK video version has been cut by almost 4 secs by the BBFC in three places. Two headbutts have been cut from the fight between Dredd and Mean Machine, as well as Stallone shooting an enemy right after he breaks free. A headbutt has also been cut from the fight between Hershey and Ilsa. The UK cinema version was uncut. A photograph in an SFX magazine article in 1995 showed Dredd shooting a Judge clone, but this scene isn't in the US or UK versions. This scene was also featured in the serialized comic strip adaptation of the film that was printed in Sunday Magazine in 1995. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Rifftrax: Batman v. Superman (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Time
Performed by Ryo Aska
Produced and Arranged by George Acogny
Music by Ryo Aska
Lyrics by Ervin Bedward
Published by Yamaha Music Foundation/Real Cast Inc.
Aska appears courtesy of Yamaha Music Foundation/Real Cast Inc.
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User Reviews

 
Delivers thought-provoking action in a fantasy sci-fi wrapping
25 April 2005 | by BrandtSponsellerSee all my reviews

Judge Dredd is based on one of the most popular characters from the UK's 2000 AD comics. It is set in the 22nd Century, when most of the Earth has been turned into a desolate wasteland known as the "Cursed Earth" and most humans live in highly concentrated cities, walled off from the rest of the world. Society is fairly anarchic, except there for a class of humans, known as "judges", who act as cop, judge, jury and executioner all rolled into one. Sylvester Stallone is the titular judge. He's notorious among the other judges, the general citizenry and the other judges for upholding the law in a harsh way. The film primarily tells the story arc from the comics known as "The Return of Rico", and concerns a plot to get Dredd into trouble while overthrowing what's left of the existing "order".

This is a great action/sci-fi film with a tone reminiscent of Demolition Man (1993), Total Recall (1990), The Fifth Element (1997), Blade Runner (1982) and similar films. If you like Stallone, gloomy futuristic production design and/or intense action films, Judge Dredd should be a rewarding experience for you, as long as you're not a purist who is coming to the film by way of an intricate familiarity with the 2000 AD comics.

The source material caused a slight problem for me, too, but not because I'm a purist. Rather, Judge Dredd suffers a bit from a flaw that plagues many films based on comic books--writers Michael De Luca, William Wisher Jr. and Steven E. de Souza had an extensive, pre-existent mythology (as is necessary when creating a complete, new world) on which to build their work, and they tried to incorporate a bit too much of it. Because of this, we're introduced to a large cast of characters fulfilling functions that we're not familiar with (in the details, at least), and we're regularly faced with new lingo, new cultural concepts, new technology, and so on, often with just a couple lines of dialogue. If you want to understand the details, you really have to pay close attention. But on the other hand, the general arc of the story is relatively simple, and you don't have to know every detail to enjoy it.

Given the disposition that Stallone has as Judge Dredd in the film, he may as well have walked out of Kurt Wimmer's film Equilibrium (2002). Dredd initially goes about his business almost robotically; he only cares about enforcing the law. When he's recruited by a higher-up, Chief Justice Fargo (Max von Sydow), to teach ethics (which is quite an ironic idea when you see Dredd's behavior in the opening scene), he tells the students that being a judge basically means giving up one's life to the law. He says that one cannot have friends, for example--never mind that other judges, like Judge Hershey (Diane Lane) try to have social lives outside of work. Dredd later tells Hershey that he did have a friend at one point, but he had to judge him. Sending a friend to prison or killing him (we're not told exactly how Dredd judged him, although we find out later) isn't exactly the best way to encourage a healthy social life.

So the subtext of the story, and Dredd's character arc, becomes that through a number of hardships, he finally learns something about ethics for himself--just in time to deal with a potentially shattering bit of information about his personal identity. He ends up accompanied by a man, Herman Ferguson (Rob Schneider, in a role meant primarily as comic relief, although more generously, he's an ironic emotional facilitator), whom he had just judged harshly, even though Ferguson wasn't really doing anything wrong on his first day out of prison. Together they have to go to a figurative hell (The Cursed Earth) to deal with figurative "demons" (a famed band of rogue cannibals who live in the tough environment) and back again to reach their fulfillment.

Like many recent sci-fi stories set in the future, Judge Dredd has a pessimistic view of where technology and social conventions are leading humans. As the story has it, at one point, we had built massive, relatively unstoppable robot warriors, and one of the highlights of the film is when the villain finds one and puts it back into service. It's as much fun to watch the gadgetry as it is to watch the action sequences, and the computer generated "landscapes" throughout the film are spellbinding, with their sly jabs at various changes and similarities to present locations and cultures. The whole concept of the judges and their hierarchical structure is fascinating, even if some apparent inconsistencies (such as why judges are not summarily dealt with in the same manner that other citizens are) are never explained in the film.

The performances are good, even if a few actors barely get enough screen time (like Lane and Joan Chen, who plays semi-villain Ilsa), and the premise is captivating. It's too bad this film gets unduly knocked by purists and those misguidedly looking for detail realism in the genre. Judge Dredd is severely underrated on IMDb. It deserves a first look or a second chance.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 June 1995 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Judge Dredd See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$90,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$12,291,536, 2 July 1995

Gross USA:

$34,693,481

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$113,493,481
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | SDDS (8 channels)| DTS | SDDS | Dolby

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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