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Trailer for upcoming clubbing crowd-pleaser ‘Ravers’

Trailer for upcoming clubbing crowd-pleaser ‘Ravers’
Here’s a brand new trailer for the upcoming crowd-pleaser Ravers which lands on digital next month through Blue Finch Films.

A group of clubbers descend on an abandoned warehouse for a night of twisted techno and hedonistic drug-taking, but the illegal rave takes a blood-stained turn for the worse when the whacked-out partygoers discover a case of energy drink ‘Renergize’.

Little do they know, the experimental drink caused a factory worker to butcher his colleagues months earlier and soon the party descends into violent carnage. Caught in the middle of the slaughter is Becky (Georgia Hirst), a germaphobic journalist who must overcome her crippling-fear of gore and grime to make it out of the party alive…

Related: Ravers review

With a stellar soundtrack of techno and drum ‘n’ bass from big-hitters such Maceo Plex, Noisia, Jeff Mills and Black Sun Empire to underground heroes Katharsys and Dave The Drummer,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

The B-Side – John Carpenter

Happy Halloween! In keeping with a now two-year tradition, we are examining the B-Sides of those involved with the Halloween franchise in honor of the spooooky holiday. This time, we talk John Carpenter. The master filmmaker has been doing a lot with a little for a long time, while fighting to keep his originality when given a bigger budget.

Here, we discuss Memoirs of an Invisible Man (1992), Vampires (1998), Ghosts of Mars (2001), and The Ward (2010) with special guest, author and editor Alex Sherman.

The director has been very honest about his process, extremely critical of the Hollywood system, and famously protective of his creations. Case in point, his contract regarding Snake Plissken.

We discuss the reasons why Ice Cube laments making Ghosts of Mars and the reasons why Carpenter laments critics taking it seriously. We discuss the two Jason Statham vs. Jet Li action movies (The One & War). And, finally, we
See full article at The Film Stage »

John Carpenter Considers Directing Little Horror Film, Big Action Movie or TV Next

John Carpenter Considers Directing Little Horror Film, Big Action Movie or TV Next
Legendary director John Carpenter hasn't directed a movie in almost a decade, but the filmmaker is making it clear he is not officially retired. In a new interview with Collider, Carpenter says he's still open to directing once again. Last year, Carpenter expressed similar thoughts, noting that he wouldn't mind directing another movie again as long as it wasn't The Thing 2. Now, Carpenter says he would particularly like to do another horror or even an adventure movie, but only if it's for a project he would truly enjoy taking part in.

"I don't have one scheduled but I'm working on things. I made a lot of movies and I got burned out and I had to stop for a while. I have to have a life. Circumstance would have to be correct for me to do it again. I'd love to make a little horror film that would be great or a big adventure film.
See full article at MovieWeb »

NYC Weekend Watch: Claude Lanzmann, Chris Marker, ‘Ghosts of Mars’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Quad Cinema

Often considered the most important filmmaker of the last 40 years, Claude Lanzmann is given a retrospective — including his landmark Shoah.

A 20th-anniversary screening of Susan Skoog’s Whatever is held on Saturday.

Metrograph

Newly restored, Chris Marker’s The Owl’s Legacy begins screening.

Two certified classics from Leos Carax are running, while
See full article at The Film Stage »

5 Most John Carpenter Things About the Original Halloween

5 Most John Carpenter Things About the Original Halloween
John Carpenter is easily one of cinema's biggest giants. The man practically invented the restrained, horror film genre that we see today. These are horror films that move at a slower pace, rely on the musical score, and are cut in such a way that it looks as if the film's editing was done in camera. All of these Carpenterisms of this can be traced back to one film, Halloween.

Sure, John Carpenter made films before this. Assault on Precinct 13 certainly showed the crystallization of an auteur but it was Halloween that established the John Carpenter style. This film would set the groundwork for his soundtracks, how those soundtracks inevitably became characters in the film, editing, classic filmic composition, and how the villain would be introduced in a John Carpenter film. So special was this mixture of the Carpenter style that movies like Friday the 13th and A Nightmare On Elm Street
See full article at MovieWeb »

John Carpenter Wants to Direct a New Movie, But It Won't Be The Thing 2

John Carpenter Wants to Direct a New Movie, But It Won't Be The Thing 2
It has now been eight years since the legendary John Carpenter has directed a feature film, last helming the 2010 psychological thriller The Ward. Before that, it was an even longer stretch between movies, not directing a film since the 2001 sci-fi movie Ghosts of Mars. With only two films under his belt since the start of the new millennium, Carpenter's career as a director has significantly slowed down, but don't let that fool you. According to the Master of Horror himself, Carpenter hasn't hung the slate up just yet, and more feature films could be in the director's future.

Recently, Carpenter spoke on the status of his filmmaking career, and it's now apparent he's not through with making movies. However, given his age, the director would rather work on a shoot that's going to be easier on his body. Carpenter is considering various options, including taking a film project overseas to different areas of Europe.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Masters Of Horror Rewatch: John Carpenter’s “Cigarette Burns”

It’s hard to imagine a Masters of Horror series without John Carpenter. There are other names that might be more interchangeable, or that would be less noticeable had they been left off the roster of the Showtime anthology series, but trying to do something called “Masters of Horror” without Carpenter would be like trying to do a series on NBA Legends without Michael Jordan. I don’t know that I can definitively say that John Carpenter is the greatest horror filmmaker of all time, but John Carpenter is probably the greatest horror filmmaker of all time.

There’s a lot of responsibility that comes with being the best, which means Carpenter comes into “Cigarette Burns,” his first of two Masters of Horror episodes, with a certain amount of baggage: there’s pressure on him to stand apart from the seven directors and seven episodes that have come before his,
See full article at DailyDead »

John Carpenter Will Compose the Score for the New ‘Halloween,’ Jason Blum Confirms

John Carpenter Will Compose the Score for the New ‘Halloween,’ Jason Blum Confirms
Just because John Carpenter isn’t directing the newest “Halloween” movie doesn’t mean he won’t be involved. Producer Jason Blum has confirmed that Carpenter, who composed the music for the original 1978 slasher in addition to co-writing and directing it, will return to the franchise with a simple tweet.

Carpenter has composed the music for many of his own films: “Dark Star,” “Escape From New York,” “They Live,” “The Fog,” “Christine,” and so on and so forth. This new “Halloween,” which is being directed by David Gordon Green, will be his first film score since 2001’s “Ghosts of Mars.” It’s also the first “Halloween” movie in nearly a decade, following Rob Zombie’s 2007 remake and its 2009 sequel.

Green, whose all-over-the-place career has seen him direct everything from “George Washington” and “Joe” to “Pineapple Express” and “Stronger,” also co-wrote the screenplay with Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley. Jamie Lee Curtis
See full article at Indiewire »

[Podcast] We Need To Talk About Horror Episode 11: Death Note (2017), It (2017) and Remembering Tobe Hooper

Andy, Mike, Josh and Josh’s girlfriend, Janna fire up the microphones to have a discussion about Adam Wingard’s Death Note, the 2017 adaptation of It and we pay tribute to the late Tobe Hooper. Also, just when you thought it was safe…Horrorlimination!

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Show Notes:

00:02:50 – What We’ve Been Watching

Josh & Janna – Blood: The Last Vampire, Adam Wingard’s Death Note (discussion starts at 00:03:56), Firestarter, Miracle Mile, Sorcerer, The Good Son, Cat’s Eye, Die, Monster, Die, Shin Godzilla, The Killing of America, Stagefright (1988), Deranged, Demon Seed, The Boy (2016), Toolbox Murders (2004), Ghosts of Mars, The Hunger, Avgn X, Josh is also reading Bruce Campbell’s Hail to the Chin book and was called a genius. Janna started “Stranger Things” because Josh is procrastinating. Janna also watched Shiki and is reading “Ax Murders of Saxtown: The Unsolved Crime That Terrorized a Town
See full article at Destroy the Brain »

Video Essay. John Carpenter: Master of Perspective

John Carpenter's Christine (1983) is showing May 4 - June 3 and Starman (1984) is showing May 5 - June 4, 2017 in the United Kingdom.From the start, the disparity between John Carpenter’s tastes and his impulses as an artist were obvious to even those who loved him dearly. His breakout film, Halloween (1978), arguably the most replicated movie of all-time, was derided by one side of the taste divide for its players’ full-throated embrace of still-nascent horror archetypes—those whining babysitters and their slavishly puckish boyfriends!—and celebrated by the other for stylishly transcending its origins as an artless genre project. His remake of The Thing (1982) was attacked for placing special effects on the same level as classic suspense techniques, both of which, in Carpenter’s hands, were executed to perfection and denigrated accordingly. This duality in Carpenter’s work lead many, particularly as his career went on, to push back against his perceived inclination towards silliness.
See full article at MUBI »

There’s Reason to Be Excited About The ‘Escape from New York’ Remake

With Robert Rodriguez behind the camera, at least.

Everyone hates remakes. As film-critic people, we are obligated to hate remakes and reboots ever more. Remember Ben-Hur with Morgan Freeman? Remember Tim Burton’s Planet of the Apes (2001)? But I’m can’t help but get excited about the remake of John Carpenter’s Escape from New York (1981) that 20th Century Fox is starting to get the ball actually rolling on. For one, Carpenter remains on hand as executive producer, which kind of makes the director and now-prolific rock star look like a father watching kid’s play with his old toys. Carpenter hasn’t done anything, movie-wise, in almost decade so it’s nice to see that he’ll be somewhere behind a camera sometime soon. Last year, he announced that he’d be also be on hand to help helm currently-hip Blumhouse Production’s first take on the ninth Halloween movie. So
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Journal (6.6.16 - 1.10.17)

  • MUBI
The latest installment in the filmmaker's series of journal-films combining iPhone footage and sounds and images from movies. A diary penned with cinema.Journal (6.6.16 - 1.10.17)feat. additional footage from Masha Tupitsyn and Isiah MedinaMy journal-film series (of which this is the third installment) came to be as a means of resolving the points of convergence and departure amongst the environments I occupy and those which I encounter in cinema. I like to view these films as a method of managing the images that take up my thoughts and memories into a new continuity, one in which the distinction between images seen on-screen and those personally experienced is no longer absolute. In dissolving this partition, these films provide a vector for the animation conceptual concerns through cinema - montage fulfilling that which language can only formally describe and vice versa. The following essay outlines some of the concerns this film attempts
See full article at MUBI »

The Bottom Shelf: John Carpenter, Absurd, Intruder, Creepy

Nick Aldwinckle Mar 2, 2017

Vampires, Ghosts Of Mars and the super-tense Creepy lead our latest round-up of horror DVDs and Blu-rays...

Any regular readers (there must be a few of you; there must be) will be more than aware of this writer’s borderline obsessive love for the movies of one John Carpenter. You’ve got your Halloween, The Thing, They Live or The Fog, but everyone knows the real quality comes in the form of the later films in this cult film-maker, lord of the synth and accomplished ‘tache-wearer’s career and the classics that are Escape From L.A and his TV-movie take on Village Of The Damned. No? Ok, those are both more than a little iffy, but with the latest Blu-ray release of two other generally maligned late efforts in Carpenter’s body of work, we ask the age-old question 'Was Vampires really that bad?'

Yes,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Review: ‘Resident Evil: The Final Chapter’ Proves Paul W.S. Anderson Isn’t Out of Ideas

Let’s get this out of the way, vulgarians: Resident Evil: The Final Chapter is a bit different than the past Paul W.S. Anderson-directed entries. As evident from its initial trailer and clips, hand-held camerawork and frenetic cutting have come to replace the balletic action choreography praised as “bodies in motion and / or space” by numerous online film pundits. Which is not to act as if Anderson handed off the reins of his beloved franchise to Olivier Megaton or somebody, but this newest installment can’t necessarily be treated as another victory lap for Anderson’s superior technique. (Don’t worry: there are still plenty of corridors and trap doors to waltz through.) Yet once one is acclimated to this chaos-cinema form, even if it’s a bit more assaultive in post-converted 3D, the writer-director’s simultaneous economic storytelling and boyish imagination come into clear view.

It may have
See full article at The Film Stage »

Directors' Trademarks: John Carpenter

  • Cinelinx
What better way to prepare for Halloween than look back at one of the most iconic horror film directors of all time! Join us as we examining the trademark style and calling signs of John Carpenter, aka. The Master of Horror, as director.

John Carpenter is a filmmaker best characterized by his work in genre films. He became fascinated by film at a young age and attended film school at the University of Southern California before dropping out in 1974 to film his feature debut, Dark Star. That film didn’t get much commercial traction, but caught the attention of many in the industry who admired Carpenter’s ability to make the film on a shoestring budget. His follow-up was 1976’s Assault on Precinct 13, which didn’t receive much attention upon release, but after a showing at several festivals in 1977 became a critical hit and received a strong cult following.
See full article at Cinelinx »

DVD & Blu-rays: Jaws sequels, Chuck Norris

Nick Aldwinckle Sep 2, 2016

Our latest The Bottom Shelf DVD and Blu-ray round-up features Jaws 2, Jaws 3-D, Jaws: The Revenge and Chuck Norris...

With Shark Week arguably America’s most beloved religious festival and the unprecedented worldwide cultural impact of Anthony C. Ferrante’s acclaimed Sharknado trilogy showing no sign of letting up, who could deny the necessity of the Jaws sequels finally getting a Blu-ray release?

The immediate answer is obvious (well, anyone), though this belated look at Jaws 2, Jaws 3-D, Jaws: The Revenge and Jaws 5: The Sharkening was, for this writer at least, a nostalgic journey through a world where morbidly obese fish bear grudges, Michael Caine fights a script far deadlier than any marine predator and where lines such as “Weld that sonuvabitch” are somehow deemed passable.

Generally considered the best of the sequels, perhaps Jaws 2 holds a special place in the heart of the reader who,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Three Review: It’s Out of Ten

Johnnie To’s Three Should Be Subtitled ‘Out of Ten’Fantasia Film Festival 2016

Steven Spielberg’s 1941. Peter Jackson’s The Lovely Bones. John Carpenter’s Ghosts of Mars. William Friedkin’s Deal of the Century. Dario Argento’s entire post-Opera filmography.

Great directors sometimes make mediocre or downright awful films. It happens to the best, and with the release of Johnnie To’s Three the director of Election, Mad Detective, Drug War, and countless other action gems has joined the club.

Shun (Wallace Chung) is a master criminal whose most recent clash with the law leaves him rushed to a hospital with a bullet in his brain. Inspector Chan (Louis Koo) has been after the thief and his violent gang for a while, and now that he has him he wants Shun to spill details of their next target. Dr. Tong (Vicki Zhao) couldn’t care less about Chan’s needs though as Shun’s condition requires
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Polter-guess: match the ghost to the movie – quiz

As Paul Feig’s Ghostbusters reboot hits cinemas this week, how familiar are you with other movie ghouls?

Ghost Town

The Sixth Sense

The Haunting

Over Her Dead Body

Shutter

Dark Water

The Eye

The Grudge

Lady in White

Poltergeist

Beetlejuice

Hellraiser

Thirteen Ghosts

House on Haunted Hill

Ghosts of Mars

What Lies Beneath

The Haunting

The Innocents

Carnival of Souls

The Terror

Stir of Echoes

Mama

The Conjuring

Insidious

The Haunted Mansion

A Haunted House

Heart and Souls

The Frighteners

High Spirits

Haunted

House

Scrooged

Safe Haven

The Pact

Just Like Heaven

Ghosts of Girlfriends Past

Casper

Campfire Tales

Ghostbusters II

Ghost Dad

7 and above.

You showed real spirit

0 and above.

You never stood a ghost of a chance

4 and above.

That was a bust

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

John Carpenter talks Halloween sequel, video games and his band

  • ScreenDaily
John Carpenter talks Halloween sequel, video games and his band
Horror master talks video game adaptations of his films, his music career and the possibility of composing the music for the Halloween sequel.

Horror maestro John Carpenter could write the score for the latest spin off of his 1978 classic, Halloween.

Carpenter is already on board as executive producer of the new movie, announced earlier this summer.

“Maybe I’ll do the music,” the 68-year-old filmmaker told Screen about the project which is being made by Miramax and Blumhouse.

However, Carpenter (who scored the original film) confirmed that he will definitely not be directing the project.

The director/composer/keyboardist was speaking to Screen at the the Neuchâtel International Fantastic Film Festival (Niff, 1-9 July) where Carpenter and his band performed his film music together with original music from his Lost Themes albums at a sold out concert in the town’s cavernous Théâtre du Passage.

Carpenter hasn’t directed a feature film since The Ward in 2010 and
See full article at ScreenDaily »

John Carpenter talks Holloween sequel, video games and his band

  • ScreenDaily
John Carpenter talks Holloween sequel, video games and his band
Horror master talks video game adaptations of his films, his music career and the possibility of composing the music for the Halloween sequel.

Horror maestro John Carpenter could write the score for the latest spin off of his 1978 classic, Halloween.

Carpenter is already on board as executive producer of the new movie, announced earlier this summer.

“Maybe I’ll do the music,” the 68-year-old filmmaker told Screen about the project which is being made by Miramax and Blumhouse.

However, Carpenter (who scored the original film) confirmed that he will definitely not be directing the project.

The director/composer/keyboardist was speaking to Screen at the the Neuchâtel International Fantastic Film Festival (Niff, 1-9 July) where Carpenter and his band performed his film music together with original music from his Lost Themes albums at a sold out concert in the town’s cavernous Théâtre du Passage.

Carpenter hasn’t directed a feature film since The Ward in 2010 and
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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