7.1/10
3,615
65 user 42 critic

Sweet Land (2005)

In 1920, Inge, a German national, travels from Norway to rural Minnesota for her arranged marriage to Olaf, a Norwegian farmer; bureaucracy and prejudice cause major complications.

Director:

Ali Selim

Writers:

Will Weaver (short story "A Gravestone Made of Wheat"), Ali Selim
9 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Elizabeth Reaser ... Young Inge
Lois Smith ... Old Inge
Patrick Heusinger ... Young Lars
Stephen Pelinski Stephen Pelinski ... Old Lars
Tim Guinee ... Young Olaf
Robert Hogan ... Old Olaf
Alan Cumming ... Young Frandsen
Paul Sand ... Old Frandsen
Jodie Markell ... Donna Torvik
Sage Kermes ... Mae Torvik
Kirsten Frantzich Kirsten Frantzich ... Lee
Stephen Yoakam Stephen Yoakam ... Einar Torvik
Karen Landry ... Rose Torvik
James Cada James Cada ... Minister Thorwald
Debbie DeLisi ... Sarah Torvik
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Storyline

As Inge buries her husband Olaf on their Minnesota farm in 1968, we relive her life story as she tells her grown grandson about how she arrived from Germany in 1920 as Olaf's postal bride and of the obstacles they overcame in order to marry... Written by Lillian LaSalle

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Every journey ends at home. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for brief partial nudity and mild language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Elizabeth Reasers' Norwegian pronunciation was so bad that after Dagbladet (one of Norway's biggest news-papers) stumbled upon this film, they posted a clip from it with the title "What is she trying to say?" See more »

Goofs

During the train depot scene, the pendulum of the regulator clock on the wall is not moving yet as the scenes progress, the hands of the clock move from 2:10 to 3:30. Impossible for hands to move without the pendulum as it was not an electric clock and certainly not a quartz movement circa 1920. See more »

Quotes

Inge: Dreams? Yes, you have?
Young Olaf: I have work, I don't have dreams.
Inge: [pushes him in a rage] Crows have dreams!
Young Olaf: [correcting her] "Ducks".
Inge: ...pheasants, all have dreams. But not you!
Young Olaf: Ducks don't have dreams. They get cold, they fly south.
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Soundtracks

Quiet Breathing
Music and Lyrics by Mark Orton, Thomas Lieberman (as T.F. Lieberman) and Haley Bonar
Published by Camp Watertown Music/Liza Rose Music
Quiet Breathing, LP (ASCAP)
Performed by Haley Bonar
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User Reviews

 
A lovely film which deserves to be widely seen
23 December 2006 | by lwalshSee all my reviews

'Sweet Land' manages a difficult feat: it is a historical film with a clear message for the present, yet it avoids becoming either nostalgically cloying or preachily shrill. "Banking and farming don't mix" is not merely a phrase heard several times; it is the key to the confrontation of two utterly different, and utterly irreconcilable, attitudes toward land and life. Ned Beatty, as the chief banker, embodies the one, driven by money and power, harshly and repellently (it's a superb performance), but he and his few allies, and what they stand for, cannot completely overwhelm what most of the other characters, major and minor, believe in and represent: the importance of human connections, with each other and with the jobs they must carry out.

There is scarcely a false step in this film. Elizabeth Reaser brings Inge to life completely believably and very poignantly. We truly care about this woman, a fact made all the more astonishing when we realize that for a sizable part of the film she speaks in languages most of the American audience will not understand. It's one of the best performances I've seen in a long time. Similarly convincing is Tim Guinee as Olaf, her perplexed husband-to-be. His struggles to overcome prejudice (his own and that of his neighbors) are played with a delightful mix of humor, pathos, and inner strength which mirror the complex set of forces with which he must deal. Much the same could be said, albeit on a smaller scale, of the lesser parts; these performers inhabit these roles as if they had already lived them for real. Watch the interactions between Alan Cumming and Alex Kingston, for example; these are two people who are deeply and genuinely in love, but who recognize and accept the flaws of the other. There is no conventional 'happy marriage' insipidity here-- with the result that their marriage comes across as truly happy in a far more profound manner than so many others on screen.

Visually the film is often lovely. It is not as lusciously filmed as Terrence Malick's 'Days of Heaven', with which it shares an underlying approach, but it also avoids the occasional glossiness which undercut the down-to-earth elements of the earlier film's plot. Here the images rarely feel forced, and never overwhelm the intense sense of physical presence so vital to both plot and message. Also powerful is the use of two framing stories, linked to but not dependent upon the central plot. Indeed, the emotional climax of the film actually resides in the contemporary story, something we will not realize until almost the very end of the film. What seems a mere narrative trick suddenly resonates with tremendous power, and brings home the film's central theme beautifully yet without undue emphasis.

The flaws are few. The music, usually vaguely folksy without being especially engaging, is more than once rather too modern in its feel and too diffuse in its impact to support the visuals. The music is the weakest element in the film; at times it sounds almost as if the decision to add music was taken so late in production that all that was possible was some improvisational doodling, which fits neither the delicately shaped mood nor the careful pacing and structuring of the action. The important part of Minister Sorrensen is a bit awkwardly written, with his changes of outlook being rather too sudden; John Heard's performance, though thoughtful, could likewise be more nuanced (he was probably responding to the part as written, but in this case he would have been better off to play against the script).

'Sweet Land' is a beautiful, funny, and often very moving film, with a deep and respectful sense of history and human relations. Both the action and the thoughts it provokes will linger long after the curtain closes. The film has much to offer, and I recommend it very highly.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German | Norwegian

Release Date:

31 July 2008 (Brazil) See more »

Also Known As:

Wedding Photo See more »

Filming Locations:

Dawson, Minnesota, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$41,860, 15 October 2006

Gross USA:

$1,706,325

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,843,537
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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