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The X Files: I Want to Believe (2008)

PG-13 | | Crime, Drama, Horror | 25 July 2008 (USA)
Mulder and Scully are called back to duty by the FBI when a former priest claims to be receiving psychic visions pertaining to a kidnapped agent.

Director:

Chris Carter

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
David Duchovny ... Fox Mulder
Gillian Anderson ... Dana Scully
Amanda Peet ... ASAC Dakota Whitney
Billy Connolly ... Father Joseph Crissman
Xzibit ... Agent Mosley Drummy (as Alvin 'Xzibit' Joiner)
Mitch Pileggi ... Walter Skinner
Callum Keith Rennie ... 2nd Abductor - Janke Dacyshyn
Adam Godley ... Father Ybarra
Alex Diakun ... Gaunt Man
Nicki Aycox ... 2nd Victim - Cheryl Cunningham
Fagin Woodcock Fagin Woodcock ... 1st Abductor - Franz Tomczeszyn
Marco Niccoli Marco Niccoli ... Christian Fearon
Carrie Ruscheinsky ... Margaret Fearon
Spencer Maybee Spencer Maybee ... Blair Fearon
Veronika Hadrava ... Female Assistant
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Storyline

Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) and Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) worked at the F.B.I. as partners, a bond between them that led to them becoming lovers. But now they're out of the F.B.I. and have begun new careers. Scully works as a staff physician at a Catholic hospital. Her focus these days is on a young boy with an incurable brain disease. Administration wants to give up on him. Scully, who feels a special bond with the boy, does not. Meanwhile, Mulder's focus is on clipping newspaper articles, throwing pencils into his ceiling and writing about the paranormal. Scully and Mulder are brought together as partners again when a special case requires Mulder's expertise, and Scully is prevailed upon to convince him to help. The case involves a pedophile priest who claims he is having psychic visions regarding the whereabouts of a missing F.B.I. Agent. Written by J. Spurlin

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Believe Again See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for violent and disturbing content and thematic material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Dana Scully first visits Fox Mulder in their rural home, Mulder is tacking up a story titled "Princeton closes ESP Lab after 40 years of paranormal study". This refers to a real-life event. The Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research facility (P.E.A.R.) closed in 2007 after school administrators felt continued funding was unjustified. The lab's original mission was to investigate possible phenomena for the defense industry, such as if the minor electrical field present in the human body could interfere with sensitive electrical equipment when the body was placed under extreme stress (for example, a fighter pilot involved in a dogfight causing his controls to malfunction). While the lab failed to provide conclusive evidence that such things could happen, large-scale experiments showed a statistically detectable influence. Other P.E.A.R. experiments included such things as remote perception. See more »

Goofs

While Father Joesph is hospital, the heart monitoring equipment on him is placed incorrectly. The black lead should be on his left shoulder, not green as seen in the movie. See more »

Quotes

Assistant Director Walter Skinner: We will find him. I know Mulder. He'd get to a phone and call first. He wouldn't do anything crazy.
[Scully stares at him]
Assistant Director Walter Skinner: Not overly crazy.
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Crazy Credits

In the extended director's cut, end credits are accompanied by pictures of the person credited and other behind-the-scenes photos of the cast and crew, many of which were taken by Chris Carter. See more »

Alternate Versions

The DVD release includes a "Director's Cut" of the film, which runs about 4 minutes longer. According to David Duchovny, this version includes some more graphic / disturbing scenes that Chris Carter did not use in order to avoid an R-Rating. See more »

Connections

References E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

Memories Child
(2002)
Written and Performed by Jamison Young
Courtesy of BeatPick
(in Cheryl Cunningham's car)
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User Reviews

 
No Country for Old X-Files
27 July 2008 | by WriterDaveSee all my reviews

The world is a greatly changed place since the heyday of "The X-files." Back in the late 1990's the TV show was at its height and tapping into the shared fears of the day: fear of the unknown, fear of the impending millennium, and fear that something larger than us (the government or alien invaders) was up to no good. Flash forward to the year 2008 and we know all that hubbub about the millennium was for nothing, our government has been up to no good for years, and it's not space invaders we need to worry about but other people terrorizing us. The murky, gloomy, grim style of "The X-Files" is now the norm with feverish and dark films like "There Will Be Blood" and "The Dark Knight" tapping into the mindset of culture today from opposite ends of the film spectrum.

Apparently creator Chris Carter didn't realize his baby was irrelevant now. His only mission should've been to please the faithful. If he wanted to revive his series on film, he had best stick to the labyrinthine alien mythology that still has some die-hard fans buzzing, or at the very least deliver a fun stand-alone monster-of-the-week style flick that would make fans jump in their seats. With "The X-Files: I Want to Believe" he does neither of those things. Instead, he gives us a story where Mulder and Scully come out of hiding to work on a case where the FBI are using a psychic criminal priest to help locate a missing agent and track down a potential serial killer. The plot fits more into the mold of his far less popular companion series "Millennium" than it does to "The X-Files." Apparently Carter wanted to please no one except perhaps himself.

The weirdest thing about the film is that it isn't all that bad. Carter as a director lays on some decent atmosphere (with all the global-warming defying snow and some eerie nighttime shots) and creates some palpable tension as the horrors of the case grow grimmer. The chemistry between Mulder (a lazy but effective David Duchovny) and Scully (an amazingly fully ranged and emotional Gillian Anderson) is still there, and Anderson's performance is especially gripping. Billy Connolly, cast against type, gives an interesting turn as the corrupted priest searching for redemption through his visions that probably would've garnered an Emmy nod had this been a very special two-part TV episode. Also good is Amanda Peet, looking smashing in her smart FBI pantsuits.

Most interesting is the story arc given Dana Scully. I honestly had stopped watching the show after the sixth season, and aside from the mythology storyline that built up to the first film released ten years ago, I recall some of my favorite episodes being the ones where Scully questioned her faith and struggled with reconciling her Catholicism with her scientific approach to the paranormal investigations. This is again explored here, as Scully, always the skeptic, so desperately wants to believe in something. However, it's an odd choice for Carter to focus on this internal human drama when he should be focusing on how to bring fans back into the fold. It would've been an interesting and compelling layer had Carter not been so inept with the rest of the plot.

In the end some fine performances and a moody atmosphere do not add up to a good time. Eventually it becomes an uncomfortable and anachronistic creep-fest that plays like the type of suspense thriller that ruled the roost in the mid-1990's after films like "Silence of the Lambs" and "Seven" made police detection and serial killing popular entertainment. Well, it's 2008, Mr. Carter, and it's time to wake up from your prolonged nightmare that was rendered uninteresting in 2001.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA | Canada

Language:

English | Russian | Czech

Release Date:

25 July 2008 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The X Files 2 See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$10,021,753, 27 July 2008

Gross USA:

$20,982,478

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$69,363,381
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut)

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS (uncredited)| SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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