"Star Trek: The Original Series" The Trouble with Tribbles (TV Episode 1967) Poster

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10/10
Tribbles and Klingons - a Match Made in Trek Heaven
Bogmeister13 October 2006
This is perhaps the most famous episode of the original Trek series and with good reason - it's also the most entertaining. I consider this part of an elite triad of superlative Trek episodes, along with "The City on the Edge of Forever" and "Mirror,Mirror." The first, "City...," is the serious one, even grim, with the time travel angle which became such a staple in all the Trek series. "Mirror..." represents the fantastic journey to other dimensions, beyond merely space travel or time travel, an ultimate adventure. And "Tribbles" is the comedy. There weren't too many intentionally amusing episodes of the original series, less than a handful. This one knocked it out of the park.

It's well known now for introducing Tribbles to our culture - that and their unexpected ability to bring out the worst in Klingons, the best-known alien species in Trek. The fuzzy things spawned a cottage industry within Trek: writer Gerrold published a book devoted just to this episode; there was a sequel in the animated series in '73; and, most impressively, a sly remake/follow-up "Trials and Tribble-ations" during the Deep Space Nine series, very clever and almost as entertaining (no surprise it's my favorite DS9 episode). But, it's not the Tribbles which make this original episode so amusing. Rather, it's the canny take on some previously established lore involving future bureaucracy in the Federation and private missions of starship captains. We've all seen Kirk go off on his personal vendettas before and also being lectured by admirals to follow orders. Here, the mundane, the banal, is thrust upon him: instead of being allowed to explore the galaxy in the grandest tradition, he's forced to guard a bunch of wheat.

It's a farce, Trek style. I could see Nimoy(Spock), usually standing slightly behind Kirk, struggling to contain himself in the face of Kirk's predicament throughout this episode. All of a sudden, these two are the Abbott & Costello of Starfleet and, boy, do I laugh a lot during those A&C movies. The tempo, the pacing and the timing in this episode is brilliant, just flawless, with the actors all rising to the occasion. When you think it can't get better, the script throws in a literal acknowledgment of Roddenberry's original concept - a 'Wagon Train to the stars' - the bar fight or the saloon brawl. The scene of Scotty & Chekov enduring Klingon insults and finally reaching that breaking point is some kind of glorious epitome in striving for first class Trek entertainment.
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9/10
Sure it's a bit overrated, but it's still very good
MartinHafer8 December 2006
While I certainly can't agree with "gary olszewski" who insists that this is the "worst episode", I do agree that it is a tad overrated. Yes, I do like it a lot, but I have talked to quite a few people who think it's the best episode. However, I might rank it in the top five--so I still liked it quite a bit because it was a good chance to do some self-parody. I really enjoy the few episodes where the show took a break from being deadly serious and just had fun--such as this one and I, MUDD and A PIECE OF THE ACTION. So, when I'm in a non-sophisticated mood, this episode is a good choice.

Kirk rushes to a star-base because the Enterprise received a message that it was a dire emergency. However, when they arrived, the base looked just fine--no evidence of an attack or an emergency. Incensed, Kirk beams down to find out what's happening. To his consternation, he finds that the "emergency" concerns a grain shipment that is intended for "Sherman's Planet" (who Sherman is, we don't know--maybe he's the one from the Mr. Peabody Show). Despite the abuse of the emergency call, Kirk is reluctantly forced to post guards and be responsible for the grain.

Since this is a star-base, the crew is given shore leave. However, Klingons are there as well for shore leave as a result of a recent treaty (the Organian one from a previous episode). And, naturally, due to the animosity between them, fights break out and the Klingons work on sabotaging the grain. At the same time, although it seems perfectly harmless, Uhura brings a cute pet back to the ship (a "tribble"). There, it multiplies like crazy and soon the ship is overwhelmed with a plague of tribbles--and so is the space station. But, this turns out to be a mixed blessing and leads to a creative solution to the plague--thanks to Scotty.

The episode is pure "tongue-in-cheek" and never takes itself seriously. The jokes and silliness come in rapid fire and you can't help but laugh at all the hooey. A must for fans of the series.
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Consistently enjoyable episode that has a good story, great sense of humour and nobody taking it seriously even once
bob the moo6 May 2007
The Enterprise respond with all speed to a priority 1 distress call on a space station but Kirk is far from impressed when he learns that the call was signalled by Undersecretary for Agriculture Baris to guard some storage compartments of a new wheat hybrid. Reluctantly, Kirk agrees but only assigns two guards, giving his other available staff shore leave on the station. The importance of the grain is brought home to him though when Starfleet command him into action and the Klingons turn up on the station for "shore leave". With all these pressures on him, peddler Cyrano Jones selling a strangely enchanting creature called a Tribble doesn't even show up on his radar.

I rarely review specific episodes of TV series but for Star Trek I thought I would locate this specific episode and watch it with a critical eye because this tends to be the one that most casual Trek viewers quote as their favourite. Watching it again I can understand why because it is a fine example of the gentle humour that makes the majority of casual viewers enjoy the series. So while we may not always like the clunking moral messages and so on, the humour is what makes it an enduring piece of entertainment. With "Tribbles" the whole story has been written with his humour running deep throughout it and everyone has their tongues in their cheeks throughout with a narrative that is wonderfully silly and fun.

The cast mostly react really well to this lack of action and drama. Shatner wears a great air of weary disbelief about everything and he has plenty of great lines – particularly when mocking Schallert's Baris. He is not a great actor but he shows a real comic touch here and I was rolling with laughter as he stands up to his chest in Tribbles being pelted from above by them while delivering his lines. Nimoy enjoys himself too with lots of "raised eyebrow" moments while Kelley, Nichols, Doohan and Koenig all get good material. Adams hams it up but within the context of this episode it works really well.

A fantastic episode then. It does depend on how you view Star Trek as a franchise because I'm sure many will see this silly episode as a low point but for me personally it is tremendous fun, had me regularly laughing out loud and left me feeling like I had been really entertained.
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9/10
"Where they'll be no Tribble at all"
bkoganbing11 January 2014
One of the most popular and deservedly so episodes of Star Trek prime is this one. I'm surprised that Tribbles did not make an appearance in TNG or any other subsequent Star Trek franchise shows.

A rather self important diplomat played by William Schallert sends the starship Enterprise on a mission to a space station commanded by Whit Bissell. He has a priority distress call sent because he has a grain shipment to deliver to a disputed planet. An itinerant trader played by Stanley Adams is also there and among the items for sale are a specifies of peaceful little furry creatures called Tribbles.

The one that Nichelle Nichols buys however starts to multiply, and MULTIPLY. Seems that Tribbles make rabbits behave like Trappist Monks. Pretty soon the Enterprise is overrun with them as well as the space station.

But curiously enough they prove to be invaluable at uncovering a dastardly Klingon plot. Seems as though they're allergic to Klingons and that raises them up somewhat in the eyes of James T. Kirk.

It's Jimmy Doohan who does find a solution to the Tribble problem. A just one all around I think.
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8/10
"There's something disquieting about these creatures".
classicsoncall6 December 2010
Warning: Spoilers
Well 'who put the tribbles in the quadrotriticale'? I guess it's the same guy who put the 'bop in the bop-she-bop', because this episode is done with sheer fun in mind, never taking things too seriously, and offering different takes on the personalities of the main Star Trek characters. For sure, Captain Kirk is totally befuddled by this intrusion into his command ("Does everybody know about this wheat but me"?), and totally vanquished by Scotty's honesty, to the point of rewarding him with confinement to quarters! Just fine with Scotty - more time for those exhilarating technical journals.

I can only think of one thing that might have made this one more hilarious, and that would have been to bring back Mudd. As it was, William Campbell does return in another guest spot as a bearded Klingon, last seen as Trelane, the Squire of Gothos back in the first season. Maybe Cyrano Jones (Stanley Adams) should have been given more screen time, what with his being a licensed asteroid locator and all. But we do get to see a Trek version of a barroom brawl, one more diversion from the regular course of duty aboard a Federation starship.

This isn't one of my favorite episodes, but I can't begrudge anyone who holds it in their top ten. It's a lot of fun, and a nice departure from battling space aliens and trying to figure out how those time warp stories work. Also a neat jumping on point for new viewers who might not know anything about Star Trek and are on the fence about joining the club.
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A fine example of
zampino-210 December 2006
A bit of a comic relief episode, this is a fine example of the character interplay that makes TOS successful. It's also shows the rich Star Trek universe, with space stations, political characters, space traders, alien enemies, and unusual and desirable (to a point) space creatures. The tribbles themselves are an interesting alien life form, at first glance bewildering to Dr. McCoy, of little practical use to Mr. Spock, threatening to the Klingons, and with an inexplicable life cycle. The episode looks forward to the future of the subsequent series (TNG/DS9/Voyager) in emphasizing political influence and intrigue over the typical episodic phaser displays and bravado, the bar fight excepted. As such it became a great foil for DS9's time-traveling return to K7, and to a lesser degree the animated series' "More Trouble with Tribbles." Silly or no, it's classic trek, and a very enjoyable episode.
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9/10
The Most Famous Episode of All
Hitchcoc29 April 2014
This is probably the most lightweight episode ever although there are also some serious issues as well. The reason for the enterprise's being where it is, is that they need to get some seed grain to another planet. William Schallert who played intellectual types throughout his career, is the pesky overseer in this one. He is constantly on Kirk's case because he is unhappy with his lack of seriousness. Meanwhile, on the planet, a man named Cyrano Jones, a traveling merchant, peddling junk, begins to distribute a little purring animal called a Tribble. They make people feel happy at their touch. They are soft and pretty. They are also perpetually pregnant and soon every nook and cranny is filled with Tribbles. The other side of the issue is that they are voracious eaters. It isn't long before the storage bins are compromised and the grain in the bins is replaced with Tribbles. There are some great scenes between the Enterprise crew and the Klingons, who have been sharing space with Kirk's crew. There is justice eventually, but not before a series of delightful events.
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8/10
There's light comedy throughout the episode. And there's some kind of trouble with Tribbles...
magicsinglez7 December 2006
Warning: Spoilers
Another comedy episode, 'A Piece of the Action', is my favorite Star Trek episode, and while 'The Trouble With Tribbles' is not one of my favorite episodes, for a lot of fans it is a favorite. An episode of Deep Space Nine had the crew go back in time and actually participate in this episode. The images of the crew of Deep Space Nine are superimposed on this original footage. 'The Trouble With Tribbles' is mostly a comedy episode. There are Klingons, but the scenes with Klingons aren't just funny, they are especially funny. This is a light-hearted, comedy episode. And there's some kind of trouble with Tribbles...
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8/10
Pure fluff
Fluke_Skywalker24 June 2016
Warning: Spoilers
Plot; Aboard a space station filled with vital grain bound for a planet in dispute between the Federation and the Klingon Empire, the real threat are rapidly multiplying creatures called Tribbles.

One of the most iconic episodes of the original series, "The Trouble with Tribbles" is also one of its most fun. In fact, for all intents and purposes, it's a flat-out comedy. Without any effort to inject a sense of drama, it winks its way through a breezy 50 minutes and gives its players a nice, if furry, section of turf to stand on. While the star of the episode is clearly Shatner (never more charming as Kirk than he is here), I really enjoyed seeing members of the "secondary" cast each get their moments to shine. Supported by great turns from actors William Schallert and Stanley Adams and a frequently witty and amusing script from David Gerrold, "The Trouble with Tribbles" is, like its title characters, pure lightweight fluff... and impossible to resist.
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10/10
Tribulation
hellraiser75 May 2016
This is my fifth favorite "Star Trek" episode, there really isn't much to say for this one, yeah there is a plot and it does develop but by it's nature it really more of a clothes liner for the comedy and that's mainly what this episode is.

It really was unique for it's time for a serious natured show let alone sci-fi show to actually do something different, change the pace of things. It surprisingly worked and this episode to me is one of the best examples of showing that comedy and sci-fi can make a beautiful combo.

In a way the episode plays out almost (and I mean almost) like one of those animal attack horror films like "The Birds" and others where it was about ordinary people dealing with creatures of nature turned against them. Though here this is the enterprise crew dealing with animal like creatures only their harmless, which I like because it's a turn on cliché.

I really love the tribles, there are just so cute as there simply gentle soft fur balls. However they are problematic as we see they multiply faster than rabbits. The visual humor is just really funny as we see how they are just practically all over the enterprise everywhere you turn.

Though to me what adds to the humor and actually makes it effective is Kirk himself. It's just funny seeing how much grief he is receiving from these cute guys, he is trying to maintain and establish order, while the Tribbles unintentionally create chaos (well sort of). From seeing them eat Kirk's lunch, but of course my favorite when Kirk opens up one of the compartments and well lets just say Kirk doesn't exactly hit the jackpot.

And of course there is the brawl scene which I found both funny and exciting. It's just funny as we see some Klingon whom is both drunk and acting like an ass at first spewing insults about Kirk. Checkov we see is close to blowing his fuse but Scotty tries to maintain order that is until the Klingon pushes a wrong button with Scotty. After what the Klingon said about the Enterprise I thought, "Oooooo, he's gonna get it now." and surely he does.

The chirography in it was solid, even one funny moment in the fight was seeing Checkov punch a Klingon in the midsection multiple times but with no damage, I thought "Oh s..." and of course you can guess what comes next for Checkov. Though what adds to the brawl is that the salesman character he is practically steeling drinks from the bar and smoothly walking past the fight.

For the tribbles as an old saying goes, the more the merrier.

Rating: 4 stars
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8/10
Grain, Klingons & Tribbles Oh My!
Rainey-Dawn10 January 2017
Season 2, episode 15. The Enterprise receives a distress call from an outlying space station, Deep Space Station K7, which is nearby the planet, Sherman's Planet, which is a territorial dispute between the Klingon Empire and the Federation. Kirk beams down with an away crew only to find that it's was just a trick to get them there to help watch a vital grain shipment... it's the only grain from Earth that will grow on Sherman's Planet. The Klingons arrive to request a shore leave to K7, Kirk agrees but limits the number of Klingons that can be there at one time. In a cafe bar where the peddler Cyrano Jones is trying to sell his tribbles. Tribbles are a furry, purring creature that are cute balls of fur. Uhura is there and falls for the little cute creature and obtains one for a pet and brings it on the Enterprise. From there, the tribbles start multiplying like crazy on the ship. On K7, the territorial dispute continues, fist fighting occurs between Klingons and some of Kirk's crew members, tribbles are multiplying and the grain has been poisoned killing quite a number of tribbles. Who poisoned the grain and what does that have to do with the tribbles? Sometimes a an episode like this is needed to keep the fun flowing even though it's a bit silly - a refreshing change from the drama that is prevalent throughout the series. Seems all Star Trek fans want a tribble of their own. Those darn tribbles! I also love the fighting between Kirk's crew and the Klingons - that is a barrel of laughs. In fact, there is humor all though this episode - that is the appeal of it.

8.5/10
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10/10
Tribbles Galore!!!
zardoz-131 June 2013
Warning: Spoilers
I've seen this imaginative episode of the original "Star Trek" television many times, but it is still a pleasure to watch it almost 50 years after it aired on NBC-TV on December 29, 1967. This second season episode finds Captain Kirk and the crew of the USS Enterprise summoned to Deep Space Station K-7 after they receive a Priority One emergency distress call from Mr. Lurry (Whit Bissell) to ostensibly guard a silo of grain bound for Sherman's Planet. Initially, Kirk (William Shatner) assumes that Klingons have attacked the station. Imagine his surprise when he learns that nothing of the sort has occurred. Kirk has little sympathy for the plight of Nilz Baris (William Schallert) who authorized Lurry to issue the emergency call. Baris has just arrived from Earth to supervise the development of Sherman's Planet. Baris' assistant Arne Darvin explains to Kirk that Baris is the Federation Undersecretary in charge of agricultural affairs in that quadrant of space. Baris fears for the safety of his grain and demands that Kirk post all available security guards around the storage compartments. Naturally, Kirk doesn't share Baris' paranoia about the safety of all storage compartments containing quadrotriticale. According to the informative Mr. Spock, quadrotriticale is a high-yield grain, a four-lobed hybrid of wheat and rye. Mr. Lurry chimes in to point out that quadrotriticale is the only Earth grain that will grow on Sherman's Planet. Baris wants to ensure that the grain is safely delivered to Sherman's Planet. Baris fears that Klingon agents may try to sabotage it. Baris is livid with indignation when he hears that Kirk has agreed to station "a mere two men for a project of this importance." Kirk tells Baris that he has never questioned the orders or the intelligence of any representative of the Federation, but he does at this juncture. Kirk is surprised when Starfleet Admiral Fitzpatrick orders him to take whatever precautions are necessary. While on shore leave, the Enterprise crew meet Cyrano Jones (Stanley Adams of "Breakfast at Tiffany's"), and he interests Uhura in a tribble, a warm, fuzzy critter that purrs like a cat. The only problem is that these tribbles reproduce like rabbits and soon they overrun the Enterprise. Worst, they get into the grain at the space station, but mysteriously enough die. Of course, Nilz Baris is incensed by Kirk's gross dereliction of duty as does his sinister looking assistant. Adding to these woes are the Klingons themselves who show up on shore leave. Captain Koloth (William Campbell) checks with Kirk to see if it is okay and Kirk agrees. Predictably, it doesn't take long for the Klingons and Kirk's crew to tangle in a free-for-all fight. As it turns out, Scotty started the brawl because a Klingon called the Enterprise a garbage scowl.

"Star Trek" writer David Gerrold scripted an episode that bears a great deal of resemblance to a 1952 science fiction novel by Robert A. Heinlein entitled "The Rolling Stones." In the Heinlein novel, twin teenagers named Castor and Pollux, who live on the Moon, have rebuilt a space ship and gone to Mars to sell bicycles. They find what is called a "flat cat." These flat cats are born pregnant, and they repopulate their ship. Interestingly, Heinlein raised no objections to Gerrold's episode. According to Gerrold, all Heinlein wanted was an autographed copy of Gerrold's script.

Altogether, this is an entertaining episode and a departure from all things serious. Ironically, Baris was correct to fear the threat that the Klingons posed to his project. The big surprise is the revelation about identity of the Klingon agent aboard Deep Space Station K-7.
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8/10
not the best, but entertaining (and corrections)
angloo12 January 2010
As a Trekspert and long-time TOS fan, I can't say this is my favourite episode, but since it was written for comic relief, while still tweaking the eternal bureaucratic pinhead mentality that persists into this century and beyond, it was extremely entertaining. Most reviewers get this. Gary does not. Trek writing is actually quite decent, if only because it still holds up in 90% of episodes after 40 years. And this episode is intentionally funny, if a bit slapstick, making it a nice diversion from the usual serious plots of TOS. {To correct tsf1962: It is not the first episode to introduce Chekov. (Whose name you misspelled.) There are two correct answers to that question depending on whether you go by air date or production date (hint: In Catspaw, Chekov defends himself saying "I'm not that green"). There is no consensus as to the most popular TOS Klingon but I will wager many votes will go to Canada's own John Colicos as Kor, menacing and threatening yet utterly fascinating to watch ("Errand of Mercy"). And who is Stephen Dorn? The character of Worf was played by MICHAEL Dorn. Comparing tribbles to rats is unfair and inaccurate; although people keep rats as pets, the tribbles were disruptive but not dirty or disease-ridden. I can forgive the misspelling of Lurry's name, but actor William SCHALLERT's name is listed in the credits. And it's Nilz BARIS, not Barrett (no relation to Majel). You got Nichelle Nichols' first name (difficult to spell) right but inexplicably botched her last name??? And as for Chekov's Beatles haircut, again, please try to watch the episodes in order before asking these kinds of questions. The Klingons were "explained" (very poorly) in Enterprise as to how they accidentally lost their foreheads.} Overall, a very enjoyable episode, with some delightfully cringe-worthy moments.
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10/10
critters and character actors
tsf-196222 November 2006
Warning: Spoilers
This classic "Star Trek" episode is notable for several reasons: it introduced Walter Koenig as Ensign Chekhov; it featured William Campbell (who had already made a strong impression as the Squire of Gothos), who was the most popular Klingon until Stephen Dorn joined the cast of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" as Lieutenant Worf; and it is arguably the funniest entry in the original series, though "A Piece of the Action" is a close second. The fiendishly inventive script deals with issues ranging from bureaucratic mismanagement to environmental contamination to Cold War rivalries. The Tribbles are evidently the deep-space equivalents of rabbits, though in some ways they're more like rats; their rapid proliferation underscores the dangers of introducing nonnative wildlife to an ecosystem. Still, they're so cute and fuzzy we forgive them. "The Trouble With Tribbles" benefits from superb ensemble acting and a gifted guest cast: besides the aforementioned William Campbell there's Stanley Adams as galactic "entrepreneur" Cyrano Jones; Whit Bissell as hard-pressed station administrator Mr. Lurie; and William Shallert as Neils Barrett, the embodiment of the snotty, arrogant bureaucrat. Among the regulars, Nichelle Nicole as Uhura and James Doohan as Scotty give strong performances; this is one time the Enterprise crew functioned like a team instead of mere background players for the Big Three. Two questions, though: what's with Chekhov's Beatles haircut (clearly non-regulation) and why do the Klingons in this episode look more Caucasian than usual? It's hard to imagine how this bunch of loud but essentially harmless Galactic outlaw bikers could have evolved into the bulbous-foreheaded, alien-looking Klingons of "The Next Generation." One theory is that the later Klingons were full-blood Klingons; the ones on the original series were a Klingon-Vulcan hybrid.
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5/10
Overrated, especially because Gerrold ripped off Heinlein
esskayess20 March 2013
It's moderately fun to watch, though slapstick has never fit in well with the overall image of the sci-fi great that is Star Trek.

That being said, Gerrold got away with murder by lifting most of the story from Robert Heinlein's "The Rolling Stones," which tells of furry "flat cats" that are born pregnant, make a soothing vibration when petted and multiply so quickly that they fill up a spaceship. Sound familiar?

Heinlein graciously allowed Gerrold to take the accolades for this, but facts are facts and the fact here is that the heart of the story was stolen.
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6/10
Big Tribble
Samuel-Shovel29 May 2018
Warning: Spoilers
In "The Trouble with Tribbles", Kirk is ordered to protect a grain supply that is required for a colonization attempt of Sherman's Planet, a contested planet between Federation and Klingon space. The grain is being stored on a space station that just so happens to have Klingons there on shore leave. Rounding out our crew is a snake oil salesman pawning off little fur-balls called Tribbles that the crew begins to adopt as pets. Kirk must protect the grain (much to his chagrin) and keep the Tribble population low.

This episode is chalk full of slapstick comedy, for better or for worse. The silly little creatures, the barroom brawl, the humorous dialogue... Many people love this episode but I'm not one of them. I've never been a huge fan of the outright silly Star Trek episodes. I think it's more successful when the writers just sprinkle it in instead of turning an episode into a downright goofy comedy. This episode just doesn't have the right balance.
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8/10
Everyone remember the Tribbles!
mm-396 November 2017
Warning: Spoilers
Everyone remembers the Tribbles! The Tribbles sounds like a British New Wave band! Live from London it's the Tribbles. Actually The Trouble with Tribbles was a well written Star Trek episode. Stark Trek only lasting three seasons, which is the reason the original series had mostly A plus scripts. Unlike, the future series which went on way way way too long. Star Trek Mc Donalds the crew deals with Klingon complaints about the food is how watered down Star had become. Sorry, I digress here..... Anyways, Trouble with Tribbles script has a great hook with these lovable fur balls which are born pregnant and multiple into a trouble. Kirk is in charge of the stored food on a planet the Kligon's want. (cold war story-line) Pestard by the Tribbles and trying protect the food supply, and defuse the Kligons provocations Kirk has problems. The Tribbles love to eat and hate/react to Kligons become the solution to Kirk's problems when the Tribbles get into the food supply eat it and die. The poisoned food and Klingon spy plot is foiled. The problem is the solution. Those darn Tribbles. A fun episode, which is enjoyable to watch. Shanter, etc cast have fun with the Tribbles script which is sci fi comic genius
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10/10
Star Trek: The Original Series - The Trouble with Tribbles
Scarecrow-8817 September 2016
Warning: Spoilers
Designed as a pure comedy episode, "The Trouble with Tribbles" does once again have the Enterprise contending with the Klingons. This time a Klingon warship orbits a space station containing grain important to both sides, agriculturally relevant on a planet which compatible soil. Shore leave gives plenty reason for a bar fight between Klingon and Federation officers. And the tribbles - furry, soft, purring reproductive creatures – are introduced to Uhura by a trader, buying and selling merchandise from one sector to another (Stanley Adams, known as Tybo, the giant carrot on the infamous Lost in Space episode, "The Great Vegetable Rebellion") looking to turn a buck or two on the station.

Charlie Brill (of Silk Stalkings) is Arne Darvin, assistant to William Schallert, whose grain of interest economically is awaiting arrival to Sherman's Planet (a disputed planet desired by both the Federation and the Klingon Empire), with Whit Bissel in charge of the space station which has become (much like the Enterprise) engulfed in breeding tribbles. William Campbell (Squire of Gothos) has a less significant role as the Klingon commander, Koloth, with Michael Pataki as his second in command, Korax. Korax is the one who insults Scotty's ship which initiates the memorable barfight. Sherman's Planet is the location where the grain goes to grow crops, with a diplomatic incident potentially threatening to the Federation's interests while the Klingons obviously wish to cause a disaster affording them access to the planet themselves. A Klingon agent is loose on the station, the tribbles and poisoned grain factor perhaps in his undoing. The tribbles disliking Klingons turns out to be a help to Kirk although their breeding is certainly a hindrance.

The agriculture dispute and Klingon conflict with the Federation are an outline for tribble comedy. Kirk's headaches with Klingons and Schallert's constantly complaining agriculture officer should be enough, but his ship being enveloped by tribbles makes matters even worse. Tribbles spilling out of a grain containment bin and on top of Kirk, with Shatner emerging from a pile of them embarrassed and flummoxed is one of the series' enduring moments. A very popular episode, "The Trouble with Tribbles" has remained a classic among Star Trek fans. It is also a pop culture darling, recognized by even those who aren't Trekkies. Deep Space Nine had a brilliant follow up to this episode celebrating the 30th anniversary. What Scotty does with the tribbles, via transport, to get them off the Enterprise (Kirk had actually sat in his Bridge command chair on one!) is fitting and ironic…they couldn't have found a better home! Adams' trader left to gather up the tribbles off the station is also plenty of proper punishment for his own contribution to Kirk's woes. A light-hearted romp, this has nary an intense moment to be had, but this episode is all the same wonderful. And it has one of the best supporting casts of B-vets you could ever ask for. When even Kirk's soup and coffee are intruded upon by the tribbles, the captain has had enough...Spock and McCoy debating tribbles and love for cute animals included makes for such good times.
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9/10
The classic comedy Trek episode
Tweekums8 July 2015
Warning: Spoilers
This classic episode sees the Enterprise responding to distress call from Space Station K-7; when they arrive they are surprised to find no sign of trouble and Kirk is furious when he learns to distress call was put out by Under-secretary of Agriculture Nilz Baris who wants a consignment of grain to be protected! K-7 is near Sherman's Planet; a planet that s claimed by both the Federation and the Klingons and the side which demonstrates they have the greater ability to develop it will be given it; the special grain is an essential part of that development. Once ordered to support Baris, Kirk allows his crew to take some shore leave; while there Uhuru acquires a cute little creature called a Tribble; its purring seems soothing to humans. It isn't long before it becomes apparent that the Tribble may be trouble; soon there are more of the creatures and it appears that they are born pregnant! Before anybody can start worrying about the Tribbles another possible problem arises; a Klingon ship arrives asking for its crew to be given some shore leave… it is only a matter of time till the two crews come into conflict.

Often comedy episodes are a bit disappointing but this one is one of the best. We have some great guest characters, including William Schallert, as the officious Baris, and Stanley Adams and Cyrano Jones, as the seller of the Tribbles. Both very different but also funny characters. It isn't just the guest stars providing laughs; Chekov's claims that just about everything was invented in Russia were amusing and Scotty's explanation of how he started a fight after the Klingons insulted the Enterprise was priceless. The Tribbles are interesting creatures despite just being purring fluff-balls and ultimately serve vital to exposing a Klingon plot. If you are a fan of Star Trek this is one of those episodes you have to see, and if you enjoy it you'll want to watch the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode 'Trials and Tribble-ations' which uses some impressive effects to revisit the events of this episode.
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7/10
Worth a look for one line alone...
SusanJL26 March 2019
I had to wonder what the other actors were thinking when the Klingon insulted Kirk by calling him "a tin-plated, overbearing, swaggering dictator with delusions of godhood." So funny, because from what I've read, many in the cast felt pretty much the same way about Shatner in real life! It's an OK episode but I wasn't wowed.
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1/10
Not my Star Trek
mhubbard-5465715 February 2017
Warning: Spoilers
My Star Trek is a somewhat cerebral program, featuring several noble but humble characters whom I came to know over the course of the series. It usually deals with important social or philosophical issues, causing one to think, ponder and contemplate.These space heroes do have a sense of humor, but it is not of the slapstick or pratfall variety. Perhaps a wry grin is merited at times, but no guffaws. There is too much important work aboard the ship to play around. It's only a five year mission to seek out new life after all, it's a big universe and time is a wastin'. For these reasons, this episode seems silly and inappropriate. Nor did I find it entertaining.It seems incongruous, a spoof or a parody of itself.The Klingons are brought in for no apparent reason, Mr Checkov, as usual, relates everything to his native country in an odd manner not suitable to the 23rd century, and the entire episode is just boring. I understand Leonard Nimoy didn't like it either.
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1/10
The WORST Star Trek of all!
gmzewski13 October 2006
"TRIBBLES" is by far, the silliest, stupidest, un-Star Trek episode of any of them! I can't understand why so many people list this one as their favorite, it's a comedy ala Abbott & Costello, just plain DUMB! The dialog is lame, the acting pedestrian, and the story itself lends nothing at all to the credence of ST, but unfortunately, does giver to the stereotype the show's detractors will point to. The tribble problem aboard the ship is but a vehicle meant to get in the way of Kirk's job of putting out all the "little fires" engulfing them, the Attack by the Klingons, for one, and Nilz Barris continually, acting the self-important bureaucrat, getting in the way. There's nothing humorous or funny about it, it's boring, almost painful to watch, and keep in mind that this is Star Trek! BUT: There IS one saving scene that makes it memorable: The confrontation between Barris & Kirk, where Barris tells him "I don't think you take this mission seriously", and Kirk responds with "The mission I take seriously, it's YOU I take lightly, now get out of my way, or I'll have you locked up!" A good line, in a very bad episode! I can only think this one may have been done as a comedy relief, to break the seriousness of the series as a whole, but no, I won't give it credit even for that. It's just BAD!
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7/10
As Star Trek - 1 star. As filler 7 stars.
Bababooe19 February 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Without Michael Pataki, as Kling-On, Korax this episode would have failed. He provoked Scotcy and Check-Off into a fight, by referring to Captain Jerk as a so called Dictator, then the Enterprise should be hauling garbage, then correcting himself by stating it should be hauled AS garbage. Great acting here. Scotcy "Would you like to rephrase that Ladi?"

William Campbell - Captain Koloth, was completely wasted in this role.

Without this acting and the fight that followed, this episode would be garbage. I don't like the comedy. These are not comic actors here. They are not Abbot and Costelo. No Steve Martins on this show. We have serious actors acting stupid. This is not a serious episode. Captain Jerk does not take his responsibility seriously., even after he gets a direct order from Starfleet.

So, what's to like. A fun and stupid episode for the kids and people who like little furry pillows. Without Pataki, and Scotcy interaction my rating would be a 1 star.
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7/10
No Tribble at all
Mr-Fusion2 August 2017
Star Trek has done comedy before, but probably not in such a concentrated dose. 'The Trouble with Tribbles' is mild farce, running Kirk ragged between testy administrators, hell-raising Klingons and furballs with rabbit-like libidos. I think the reason it (still) works so well is because Kirk is unquestionably the straight man and all sorts of laughs are being had by the crew at his expense.

The writing's good, Shatner takes the jokes like a pro and the comical tone feels right. It holds up.

7/10
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