Arn, the son of a high-ranking Swedish nobleman is educated in a monastery and sent to the Holy Land as a knight templar to do penance for a forbidden love.

Director:

Peter Flinth

Writers:

Jan Guillou (novels), Hans Gunnarsson (screenplay)
Reviews
3 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Joakim Nätterqvist ... Arn Magnusson
Sofia Helin ... Cecilia Algotsdotter
Stellan Skarsgård ... Birger Brosa
Michael Nyqvist ... Magnus Folkesson
Mirja Turestedt Mirja Turestedt ... Fru Sigrid
Morgan Alling ... Eskil Magnusson
Sven-Bertil Taube ... Biskop Bengt (as Sven Bertil Taube)
Bibi Andersson ... Moder Rikissa
Fanny Risberg ... Cecilia Blanka
Gustaf Skarsgård ... Knut
Simon Callow ... Fader Henry
Vincent Perez ... Broder Guilbert
Julia Dufvenius ... Helena
Svante Martin Svante Martin ... Karl Sverkersson
Jørgen Langhelle ... Erik Jedvardsson
Edit

Storyline

Arn, the son of a high-ranking Swedish nobleman is educated in a monastery and sent to the Holy Land as a knight templar to do penance for a forbidden love.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

In a Time of War and Betrayal, a Hero Will Rise See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | Romance | War

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Scandinavia's most expensive film production ever. See more »

Goofs

Arn's trial by the archbishop is highly anachronistic in many ways. First, the church did not have any say in matters of marriage at the time the events are supposed to happen. Such were a completely private matter between the families involved until at least early renaissance. A daughter becoming pregnant outside of marriage would be the subject of her father's wrath rather than that of the church. Second, a bishop passing sentence like that would be a political matter which would not go without debate as to whether it was under the jurisdiction of the church at all. Being a noble, Arn would be the subject of judgment by peers. Third, the sentence in itself is absurd, as the knights templar were not in any way under the command of the church (nor was its members subject to mundane law). The organization was not aimed at harboring a condemned criminal, on the contrary, joining the order would require donations, arms, servants and the trust of its other members (and a solemn ceremony and vow). Fourth, the cloister where Cecilia is ushered to has a lot more in common with 20th century orphanages than with any medieval monastery. Sending a girl into a monastic order would be the decision of the family, not a sentence made by a bishop. Fifth, with most of the members of monastic orders being either people joining voluntarily out of a spiritual call or nobles sent there by their family for education, physical punishment would not be issued as depicted. See more »

Quotes

Arn Magnusson: I don't understand. For killing two men I am set free, but for loving I am punished?
See more »

Connections

Edited into Arn (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

End Song
Composed by Anders Glenmark and Niklas Strömstedt
Performed by Marie Fredriksson
Produced by Anders Glenmark
Arranged by Anders Glenmark
Published by Blue Cable Music och Nixongs
See more »

User Reviews

 
Excellent Medieval Film About Honour And Values
12 August 2008 | by inteleartsSee all my reviews

It seems that most reviewers here want sword fights and action.

Arn is more interesting than that: it is a surprisingly complex film about honour and medieval notions of chivalry and values.

We REALLY enjoyed this - the characters are fleshed out and the plot develops at a drama pace, rather than at a dramatic pace. It seems a lot of thought went into the characterization and settings - this did cost $30,000,000 making it the most expensive Swedish film ever - and it did very well at the box office.

Those wanting just action had best look elsewhere those wanting both action and character, and a real exploration of the values of knighthood then this will definitely be your cup of tea and something to savour.

It is kind of like Braveheart in its values, and less like Kingdom of Heaven than you'd expect. Yes, it is quite elegiac, and that fits its Nordic roots well.

Overall, one of the better films about the crusades and the choices made for people living in a time when individual freedom was lost and subjugated to church and kings.

Recommended


93 of 102 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 67 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

Sweden | UK | Denmark | Norway | Finland | Germany | Morocco

Language:

Swedish | English | Arabic | French | Latin

Release Date:

17 December 2007 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

Arn: The Knight Templar See more »

Filming Locations:

Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, UK See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

EUR25,000,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$21,287,566
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed